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eBook The Impostor epub

by Damon Galgut

eBook The Impostor epub
  • ISBN: 0771035489
  • Author: Damon Galgut
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: McClelland & Stewart; First Edition edition (August 5, 2008)
  • Pages: 256 pages
  • ePUB size: 1248 kb
  • FB2 size 1808 kb
  • Formats docx mobi lrf lit


Damon Galgut (born 12 November 1963) is an award-winning South African playwright and novelist. Galgut was born in Pretoria, South Africa in 1963. His family, of European stock, had strong ties to the South African judiciary

Damon Galgut (born 12 November 1963) is an award-winning South African playwright and novelist. His family, of European stock, had strong ties to the South African judiciary. When he was six years old, Galgut was diagnosed with cancer, a trauma which he has described as "the central, cataclysmic event of my life". He fell very ill, and spent long stretches of his childhood in hospital

Damon Galgut is one of South Africa’s most exciting new literary voices. In The Impostor, his first novel since The Good Doctor, Galgut leads his readers into the developing heart of postapartheid South Africa, a landscape being reshaped by new waves of money and power.

Damon Galgut is one of South Africa’s most exciting new literary voices.

Illustration by Daniel Pudles. Get our daily newsletter. THE end of apartheid robbed South African novelists of their great theme. But it also freed them from an issue that, like the heroic statue whose shadow falls across the final paragraph of Damon Galgut's The Impostor, had previously overcast both problems of the past and growing concerns about the future.

Damon Galgut’s book, The Impostor put me in a fi. I was familiar with Damon Galgut’s work from The Good Doctor, which was shortlisted for the Booker in 2003, so when I saw The Impostor as an audio book I borrowed it from the library

Damon Galgut’s book, The Impostor put me in a fix. Everyone else was raving about this book. Also, his previous book, The Good Doctor, had been shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in 2003. I was familiar with Damon Galgut’s work from The Good Doctor, which was shortlisted for the Booker in 2003, so when I saw The Impostor as an audio book I borrowed it from the library.

In the normal course of things he wouldn’t have been here at all, but his life hadn’t been normal for a while me time to undo him. First he’d . . First he’d lost his job and then he’d lost his house.

Galgut builds his novel into a study in dread as Canning's dodgy dealings and troubled childhood surface and an eerie presence mutters dark thoughts.

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A gripping tale of guilty secrets, betrayal, and racial tension, of isolation and revenge in modern-day South Africa, from the Man Booker Prize—shortlisted author of The Good DoctorWhen Adam moves into the abandoned house on the dusty edge of town, he is hoping to recover from the loss of his job and his home in the city. But when he meets Canning — a shadowy figure from his childhood — and Canning’s enigmatic and beautiful wife, a sinister new chapter in his life begins. Canning has inherited a vast fortune and a giant folly in the veld, a magical place of fantasy and dreams that seduces Adam and transforms him absolutely, violently — and perhaps forever. The Impostor evokes a hot and cruel and claustrophobic world, in which sex and death are never far from the surface. Skilfully interweaving the story of one man’s struggle to regain his moral centre with the disorienting, often tragic effects of massive social and political change, it is Galgut’s most powerful and unforgettable novel yet.
Comments: (7)
Dianantrius
Aspiring writers would do well to read this book; successes and failures exist side by side on almost every page, pristine, pitch-perfect sentences followed by ponderous similes or overwrought prose so that the reader can't fail to understand why the latter fails and the former succeeds. Likewise with the narrative voice, and the plot. Mr. Galgut's development of his characters is flawless in stretches, opaque or earnest as is called for, but ultimately the segments of the novel fail to connect: the action of The Impostor is written on either side of chasms-several chasms-and while it is not unreasonable for an author to expect the reader to shoulder the burden of interpretation, the cumulative effect of the excluded middles inures the reader against both empathy and understanding. Presumably, Mr. Galgut's intention was to perform an experience of the anomy of the post-apartheid milieu, loose-to-shifting morals, profound lapses of identity, the irrelevance of law, etc., and he might have succeeded had he not lost faith in himself. The narrative world collapses almost completely in the last twenty pages as the novel flees allegory for the pulpit afforded by parable.

If The Impostor disappoints, however, it is only because of the promise it shows throughout. One glimpses perfection in sentences, in sections, even. Canning, especially, cuts deep into the affective experience of human contingency. While there are probably books that would be of greater benefit to would-be writers than The Impostors, there are many more that offer less, and despite its flaws, I'm not sorry to have invested the hours and days it took to read the novel. Moreover, I am well aware that America had, and perhaps in some ways maintains, its own apartheid, and that some sermons need to be heard. Perhaps The Impostor's tells us, rather bluntly (which is not to say entirely without art), something we need to hear.
Anazan
This book is effective in evoking the slow-moving, hot landscape of the karoo, and pushes various ideas regarding alienation and human interaction that seem to be recurrent themes in modern South African literature. It had some things in common with Coetzee's writing: a passivity that many readers might consider boring. However, I found it very engaging almost despite myself, and read it over the course of a day. Those who can tolerate Gabriel Garcia Marquez might find this an interesting window onto a very unfamiliar landscape.
Kare
It helps to know South Africa to love this book
Lanadrta
Met Damon at Franshhoek Literary Festival. Am hooked on his books ever since "Beautifull screaming of pigs"!
Zieryn
Have you ever thought about leaving everything behind and stay on a farm in South Africa - well, I did. If you wonder how it would be, then read this book.

This book follows an important section of South African literature: plaasroman (farm novel), based on the platteland. It started with Olive Schreiner's novel, The Story of an African Farm (1883), and many others followed. I might glimpse the reason for it: while living in Joburg, I always thought that life would have been better on the platteland, the farm areas of the (old) Transvaal: that is the soul of the country, which directed its political course, not the multi-cultural but impersonal cities, abundant with western values, detached from traditional South African values.

This book was thus illuminating, as it depicted in the first part the microcosm of a rural town in the Karoo - with all its contradictions and difficulties. Like Adam in the book, I also though that the nature of rural South Africa would have probably saved me: it is of no avail, when your soul is lost and you are a looser. The book describes brilliantly a group of disenfranchised individuals with a past but not a future - I think the first part is actually brilliant, the one based in the little karoo town - the section which is based in the city, is again impersonal, as much of life there.

I give it 7 starts for the first part, and 3 for the last one - in total 5. Good read. Enjoy it!
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