» » Stan Without Ollie: The Stan Laurel Solo Films, 1917-1927

eBook Stan Without Ollie: The Stan Laurel Solo Films, 1917-1927 epub

by James L. Neibaur,Jerry Lewis,Ted Okuda

eBook Stan Without Ollie: The Stan Laurel Solo Films, 1917-1927 epub
  • ISBN: 0786447818
  • Author: James L. Neibaur,Jerry Lewis,Ted Okuda
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: McFarland (July 17, 2012)
  • Pages: 248 pages
  • ePUB size: 1335 kb
  • FB2 size 1606 kb
  • Formats lrf rtf lrf lit


From his film debut in Nuts in May (1917) through his final solo starring effort Should .

From his film debut in Nuts in May (1917) through his final solo starring effort Should Tall Men Marry? (1928), Laurel headlined dozens of short comedies for a variety of producers and production companies, often playing characters far removed from the meek, dimwitted Stanley persona that we know and love. Comedy legend Jerry Lewis, a longtime friend and admirer of Stan Laurel, provides an affectionate and eloquent foreword. Included are several rare photographs and production stills. Ted Okuda is a Chicago-based film historian whose articles have appeared in such publications as Nostalgia Digest, Filmfax, and Classic Images.

Stan Without Ollie book. Ted Okuda, James L. Neibaur. Comedy legend Jerry Lewis, a longtime friend and admirer of Stan Laurel, provides an affectionate and eloquent foreword

Stan Without Ollie book. Long before his momentous teaming with Oliver Hardy, comedian Stan Laurel (1890-1965) was a motion picture star in his own right.

Ted Okuda and James L. Neibaur, who have probably forgotten more about movie comedians than most of will ever remember, once again hit the jackpot with this superb study of the films made by the great Stan Laurel for such. Neibaur, who have probably forgotten more about movie comedians than most of will ever remember, once again hit the jackpot with this superb study of the films made by the great Stan Laurel for such producers as . Anderson, Joe Rock and Hal Roach in the ten years prior to Stan's historic 1927 teaming with Oliver. Neibaur explore this long road to cinema success in their new book "Stan Without Ollie: The Stan Laurel Solo . Neibaur explore this long road to cinema success in their new book "Stan Without Ollie: The Stan Laurel Solo Films, 1917-1927" (McFarland & Company). As a solo performer, Laurel was liked, but not loved, by audiences. As an inventor of gags he was among the best in Hollywood at that time, but his performances fell short of the mark set by Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd. He was good, but not great

Laurel Und Hardy Stan Laurel Okuda Jerry Lewis Soloing. Over the course of his career, legendary director Werner Herzog (b. has made almost sixty films and given more than eight hundred interviews.

Laurel Und Hardy Stan Laurel Okuda Jerry Lewis Soloing. Werner Herzog (eBook). Find this Pin and more on Elvis Presley Bookshelf by John Jones. People also love these ideas. Less colourful than Alanna Nash's book, but interesting on the Colonel's earlier life and institutional connections.

Long before his momentous teaming with Oliver Hardy, comedian Stan Laurel (1890-1965) was a motion picture star in his own right. From his film debut in Nuts in May (1917) through his final solo starring effort Should Tall Men Marry? (1928), Laurel headlined dozens of short comedies for a variety of producers and production companies, often playing characters far removed from the meek, dimwitted "Stanley" persona that we know and love.

the Stan Laurel solo films, 1917-1927. Long before his momentous teaming with Oliver Hardy, comedian Stan Laurel (1890-1965) was a motion picture star.

They are: (1/3) 1. Early Charlie Chaplin: The Artist as Apprentice (2011) 2. The Silent Films of Harry Langdon (2012) 3. Stan Without Ollie: The Stan Laurel Solo Films (w/ Ted Okuda) (2012) 4. Buster Keaton's Silent Shorts (w/ Terri Lynch) (2013). 15:39 - 30 дек. 2019 г. 16 отметок Нравится. The Monster Movies of Universal Studios (2017) 14. The Charlie Chan Films (2018) 15. The Andy Clyde Columbia Comedies (2018) 16. The Hal Roach Comedy Shorts of Thelma Todd, ZaSu Pitts and Patsy Kelly (2018) 17. The Jean Harlow Films (2019). 1 ответ 0 ретвитов 9 отметок Нравится.

Stan Without Ollie The Stan Laurel Solo Films, 1917-1927 Ted Okuda and James L. Neibaur Foreword by Jerry Lewis Print . On location with Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy during the making of "Should Married Men Go Home. Neibaur Foreword by Jerry Lewis Print ISBN: 978-0-7864-4781-7 Ebook ISBN: 978-0-7864-8987-9 45 photos, appendix,. Stan Without Ollie The Stan Laurel Solo Films, 1917-1927 Ted Okuda and James L. Crazy World of Laurel and Hardy. On location with Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy during the making of "Should Married Men Go Home

Long before his momentous teaming with Oliver Hardy, comedian Stan Laurel (1890-1965) was a motion picture star in his own right. From his film debut in Nuts in May (1917) through his final solo starring effort Should Tall Men Marry? (1928), Laurel headlined dozens of short comedies for a variety of producers and production companies, often playing characters far removed from the meek, dimwitted "Stanley" persona that we know and love. This is a film-by-film look at the pictures Stan made as a solo artist, as well as those he wrote and directed for other stars, shows his development as a movie comedian and filmmaker. Comedy legend Jerry Lewis, a longtime friend and admirer of Stan Laurel, provides an affectionate and eloquent foreword. Included are several rare photographs and production stills.
Comments: (5)
Umi
They did it again. Like their excellent book on the Jerry Lewis films, this is a terrific look into the solo work of beloved comedian, Stan Laurel. We all think of him as one half of the indelible Laurel and Hardy, the greatest of all film comedy teams, but Stan had a 10 year career as a star of short silent comedies. Most of the films are minor and not very funny (IMO), but they reveal a fascinating look at a talented comedian in search of a personality. I personally think that Stan needed Ollie's talents just as much as Ollie needed Stan's creative input. The only reason I withheld a star is because of certain tiresome repetitions. I'm not sure how the book was split up between the two authors (both favorites of mine), but too many chapters ended with a variation of, "Not a great comedy, but a stepping stone toward the lovable Stanley character he became with Hardy.", I definitely recommend this book to all who love Laurel, Hardy, and classic comedy in general. Jerry Lewis provides a very insightful and affectionate foreword.
Ce
This book was a purchase for my brother who is a huge Laurel and Hardy fan. As soon as he opened this for Christmas his eyes lit up and I saw he was very happy. My only nitpick is that it is a lot of money for a over sized paperback book plus I thought it would have more pages. But I do understand that these books are a niche market and therefor smaller print runs and slightly higher cost. It's still all good and plus I know I will eventually read this too.
Nikojas
Ted Okuda and James L. Neibaur, who have probably forgotten more about movie comedians than most of will ever remember, once again hit the jackpot with this superb study of the films made by the great Stan Laurel for such producers as G.M Anderson, Joe Rock and Hal Roach in the ten years prior to Stan's historic 1927 teaming with Oliver Hardy. While most of these one-, two- and three-reel silent comedies still exist, many have been inaccessible to casual comedy fans for decades, and those that HAVE made the VHS and DVD rounds (such as Stan's 1923 one-reeler WHITE WINGS) are neither particularly good nor truly representative of Laurel's comic genius. Through careful and loving scrutiny of the presently available films, coupled with reams of fascinating research information, the authors have not only painted a vivid portrait of a true cinematic artist, but have also illustrated how many of Stan Laurel's familiar gestures, mannerisms and bits of business were auditioned and developed during his decade as a solo performer. In so doing, Okuda and Neibaur make it crystal clear that none of these Laurel trademarks were truly utilized to full comic advantage until Stan found the perfect teammate in Oliver Hardy--and not until Stan ceased doing variations on the fresh young poltroon he so often played in his early films and achieved immortality with delightfully dimwitted "Stanley" characterization.
I say "perfect" teammate in light of the fact that on several occasions Stan was paired with other performers during his formative filmic years. In 1918-19 he made three films with star comedian Larry Semon, where he managed a few shining moments despite Semon's strenuous efforts to be the only funny man in the room. Throughout his solo years--and especially during his tenure with producer Hal Roach in 1923-24--Stan was somewhat reluctantly teamed with his former vaudeville partner and erstwhile lover Mae Laurel, whose lack of charisma and comic knowhow often threatened to drag poor Stan down to her level. On a more positive note, from 1923 forward Laurel frequently found himself cast opposite the fabulous James Finlayson, he of the squinty-eyed double take and Homer Simpson-ish expletive "Doh!" While Stan and "Fin" worked well together, they weren't really teamed in the accepted sense, and Stan was always the more dominant of the two--and he certainly worked hard to achieve that dominance! Though they clearly adore the subject of their book, the authors do not shy away from observing that the early Stan Laurel sometimes came on much too strong, scampering about like a madman, glaring at the camera like a frightened deer and even laughing at his own jokes--something that the later Laurel would have abhorred.
In the tradition of John McCabe's pioneering biography MR. LAUREL AND MR. HARDY, the authors do not delve too deeply into Laurel's private life or personal problems except in relation to his films. The pure historical information provided is in itself so fascinating--notably the "backstory" for the 1924 comedy ZEB VS. PAPRIKA, a spoof of the first horse-racing world championship at Belmont Park--that one never feels cheated by the lack of intimate details regarding Laurel's offscreen demeanor. The book concludes with a survey of the Hal Roach-produced films that Stan Laurel made with Oliver Hardy prior to their official teaming, carefully noting that these were still essentially Laurel comedies with Hardy in support, and that the duo still had quite a way to go before achieving the seamless symmetry that made them the greatest comedy team of all time.
Oh, did I mention that no less than Jerry Lewis provided the book's affectionate and insightful foreword? All the more reason to buy a copy of STAN WITHOUT OLLIE. As the boys themselves would say: "That's a VERY good idea."

--Hal Erickson, author of ENCYLOPEDIA OF TV CARTOON SHOWS and MILITARY COMEDY FILMS.
Dordred
This book is an invaluable guide to Stan Laurel's early film career as new information, and several missing films, have come to light in recent years. Okuda and Neibaur's painstaking research has reached fruition in this immensely enjoyable book. Starting with Stan's very first film, Nuts In May (1917), the authors trace his gradual evolution over the space of ten years from brash clown to one of the greatest comedians of all time. The illustrations are especially good.
Wizard
This was a very interesting look at Stan's career. It was well-researched and I learned a lot. I would recommend reading it if you're a fan.
eBooks Related to Stan Without Ollie: The Stan Laurel Solo Films, 1917-1927
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020