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eBook The King's Business: Letters on the Administration of Ireland, 1740-1761, from the Papers of Sir Robert Wilmot (Ams Studies in the Eighteenth Century) epub

by Robert Wilmot,James Walton

eBook The King's Business: Letters on the Administration of Ireland, 1740-1761, from the Papers of Sir Robert Wilmot (Ams Studies in the Eighteenth Century) epub
  • ISBN: 0404635229
  • Author: Robert Wilmot,James Walton
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ams Pr Inc (June 1, 1996)
  • Pages: 237 pages
  • ePUB size: 1232 kb
  • FB2 size 1684 kb
  • Formats lrf doc lrf docx


The King's Business book.

The King's Business book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The King's Business: Letters On The Administration Of Ireland,, From The Papers Of Sir Robert Wilmot.

Pp cii, 237. New York: AMS Press. Department of History, St Patrick’s College, Drumcondra. Recommend this journal. Irish Historical Studies.

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Sir Robert Wilmot, 1st Baronet. Sir Robert Wilmot, 1st Baronet (1708–1772) was an English servant of the Crown, Secretary to successive Viceroys of Ireland from 1740 to 1772, and after 1758 Secretary to the Lord Chamberlain of the Household. By 1750 several correspondents regarded him as "the channel through which all Irish business, especially that concerning patronage, must flow".

He was unusual in the extent to which he made use of archival sources, and noted for his ability of do justice to both sides of an argument.

The large collection of letters and papers was acquired in 1735 from the .

The large collection of letters and papers was acquired in 1735 from the executors of the estate of William Paston, 2nd Earl of Yarmouth, the last in the Paston line, by the antiquary Francis Blomefield. On Blomefield's death in 1752 they came into the possession of Thomas Martin of Palgrave, Suffolk. Two recent books have presented the story of the fifteenth-century Pastons for a wide audience, Blood and Roses by Helen Castor (2004) and A Medieval Family by Frances and Joseph Gies (1998).

The book is original without being forced; the originality lies in both the fundamental scheme and in the .

The book is original without being forced; the originality lies in both the fundamental scheme and in the careful readings of particular materials. David Hall, Harvard University. Michael Warner’s compact discourse on the meaning of the printed word in eighteenth-century America will be recognized by every reader as an extraordinarily ingenious contribution, and one of lasting lasting importance, to the study of republicanism and to the history of prin. arner’s notion of a socially and culturally limited ’public sphere,’ inhabited by participants in a depersonalized, largely printed.

The 18th century is commonly known as the great age of letter writing .

Letter writers of the period used the form to describe and explore the self and everyday experience. Swift wrote a letter to Henrietta Howard (mistress to the future King George II) as if from the pen of his famous fictional creation, Lemuel Gulliver. The example of Pope’s publication of his letters earlier in the century influenced how authors viewed the value of their letters and epistolary renown more generally.

Sir Robert Wilmot served from 1740 to 1772 as private secretary to the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. His office in London was a locus of transactions between Whitehall, Dublin Castle, and the country seats of a series of viceroys, making "The Wilmot Papers" a remarkably intimate and continuous narrative of Anglo-Irish affairs. The present selection concentrates upon the most critical episode in Wilmot's tenure in office: the conflict between Castle and Commons, 1753-1756. The "Castle" here refers to Lord George Sackville, and to Sackville's friend, the precocious primate of the Church of Ireland, George Stone. To the opposition party the cold bravado of these "Ganymedes" presented a threat but also an opportunity. The contest that followed was marked by a scurrilous propaganda campaign and a series of public disorders in the course of which Government lost support, a protege of Stone's was disgraced and expelled from Parliament, and the Lord Lieutenant removed from office. Underrated by modern historians, these years were treated by contemporaries like Horace Walpole in great detail. Burke called it the time when the Anglo-Irish ascendancy "began to recollect that they had a country". For Lord Clare this was the origin of "a system that would beat down the most powerful nation on earth".
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