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eBook The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation epub

by Dr. Andrew Wilson

eBook The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation epub
  • ISBN: 0300083556
  • Author: Dr. Andrew Wilson
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Yale University Press (October 11, 2000)
  • Pages: 384 pages
  • ePUB size: 1165 kb
  • FB2 size 1184 kb
  • Formats lrf lrf lit mobi


The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation" by Andrew Wilson is a wonderful introduction to a now well-known country and people. Wilson's purpose, somewhat dissimilar to conventional histories, is to trace the development of the nation and draw distinctions between mythology and history.

The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation" by Andrew Wilson is a wonderful introduction to a now well-known country and people. Russians generally perceive Ukrainians to be a part of their nation, explaining the great sense of loss when, in 1991, Ukraine became independent. Ukrainians consistently make the case that they have a distinct heritage and culture

I understand that the purpose of this book is not to give an in-depth description of the Holocaust in Ukraine or to recount large World War II battles.

Ships from and sold by GEORGE STORE. I understand that the purpose of this book is not to give an in-depth description of the Holocaust in Ukraine or to recount large World War II battles. I harbor no illusions about the intentions of a work subtitled "Unexpected Nation". But this does not negate the fact that Wilson is attempting to paint a historical, political, religious, and ethnic portrait of a modern country, and in doing so he spends approximately 8 pages on what are arguably the most monumental events in that country's history.

Andrew Wilson (born 1961) is a British historian and political scientist specializing in Eastern Europe, particularly Ukraine. He is a Senior Policy Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, and Professor in Ukrainian studies at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies at University College London. He wrote The Ukrainians and Virtual Politics: Faking Democracy in the Post-Soviet World. Wilson is a member of the Ukraine Today media organization's International Supervisory Council. Ukrainians consistently make the case that they have a distinct heritage and culture

The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation. The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation.

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Andrew Wilson is reader in Ukrainian studies at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University College, London. Библиографические данные. Yale University Press, 2015. 0300219652, 9780300219654.

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Andrew Wilson focuses on the complex relations between Ukraine and Russia and explains the different versions of the past propagated by Ukrainians and Russians. He also examines the continuing debates over identity, culture, and religion in Ukraine since its independence in 1991. A tightly reined yet sweeping introductory examination of Ukrainian identity and history.

As in many postcommunist states, politics in Ukraine revolves around the issue of national identity. Ukrainian nationalists see themselves as one of the world’s oldest and most civilized peoples, as older brothers to the younger Russian culture.

Andrew Wilson's history of Ukraine is unlike any other book written on the subject. It does not attempt to cover the entire history of Ukraine from classical antiquity to the present, like Orest Subtelny's landmark book, Ukraine. Rather, the book's thesis looks backwards from Ukrainian Independence and asks how such a nation came into existence, and weighs its chances for survival. I grew up in a Ukrainian emigre community that taught one rigid perspective on Ukrainian history - the Ukrainian nationalist perspective.

As in many postcommunist states, politics in Ukraine revolves around the issue of national identity. Ukrainian nationalists see themselves as one of the world’s oldest and most civilized peoples, as “older brothers” to the younger Russian culture.Yet Ukraine became independent only in 1991, and Ukrainians often feel like a minority in their own country, where Russian is still the main language heard on the streets of the capital, Kiev. This book is a comprehensive guide to modern Ukraine and to the versions of its past propagated by both Russians and Ukrainians. Andrew Wilson provides the most acute, informed, and up-to-date account available of the Ukrainians and their country.Concentrating on the complex relation between Ukraine and Russia, the book begins with the myth of common origin in the early medieval era, then looks closely at the Ukrainian experience under the tsars and Soviets, the experience of minorities in the country, and the path to independence in 1991. Wilson also considers the history of Ukraine since 1991 and the continuing disputes over identity, culture, and religion. He examines the economic collapse under the first president, Leonid Kravchuk, and the attempts at recovery under his successor, Leonid Kuchma. Wilson explores the conflicts in Ukrainian society between the country’s Eurasian roots and its Western aspirations, as well as the significance of the presidential election of November 1999.
Comments: (7)
Samutilar
"The Ukrainians: Unexpected Nation" by Andrew Wilson is a wonderful introduction to a now well-known country and people. Wilson's purpose, somewhat dissimilar to conventional histories, is to trace the development of the nation and draw distinctions between mythology and history.

Russians generally perceive Ukrainians to be a part of their nation, explaining the great sense of loss when, in 1991, Ukraine became independent. Ukrainians consistently make the case that they have a distinct heritage and culture.

Both sides have a significant incentive to invent or shade history to support their respective positions.

Wilson skillfully debunks that retrospective myth-making and concludes that the truth, as always, lies somewhere in the middle. Over the past several hundred years, there has been significant cross-pollination, generally benefiting both nations.

For a more detailed and traditional history, try "Ukraine: A History" by Orest Subtelny. Paul Robert Magocsi's "A History of Ukraine" is also a competent study. But be warned: they're both 800 pages long.
Ann
Wilson covers a lot of ground and gives a good sense of the historical background and issues surrounding "what is a Ukrainian" without taking sides - something tough for a Russian, Ukrainian, or Pole to do.

The current politics is really nicely covered - I had the opportunity to watch the Orange revolution first hand - and its interesting to see the pangs of democracy's birth - and wondering where it will go.
Sironynyr
bought for a gift
Runemane
Very soviet point of view.
Ungall
Excellent...can't put the book done!

Richard
Zut
I was immensely impressed with Professor Wilson's book on Ukraine. He starts with pre-historic times and ends with the 21st century, showing why this country of 50 million people is important and why it is in a critical period in its history.
Wilson's knowledge is immense, the result of much scholarship, interviews and many visits. His is an objective view that aims to be fair, which means that many members of the Ukrainian political right and left will be displeased with parts of this book.
I found that it filled many gaps in my knowledge and underlined Ukraine's precarious stuation. It is now ruled by a ... elite (read old communist commisars) an elite that has no loyalty to the Ukrainian people. It has tried to plunder the country's resources as quickly as possible. This elite is not interested in the rule of law or fair taxation. ...
So the country has venal oligarchs on the right, supporting Kuchma, and the communist party on the left. It is still powerful in Ukraine's parliament and is oppsed to any real economic reform.
Ukraine needs a miracle or else it will again be swallowed up by Russia, which as Profesor Wilson points out, will not be good for the world. Not onl;y will the attempt mean a civil war but if Russia succeeds it will once again try for empire.
A final note: this is not an entertainment, a fun read, like many books about countries. You have to be seriously interested in understanding modern Ukraine. Look at it more as a textbook. I found it invaluable, especially this new edition which brings it up to 2002.
Stick
Do not buy this book if it is on the recommended reading list for a trip to the Ukraine. It is laborious to read, so detailed it is agony. I finally read just the chapter summary. It is more of a reasearch study appropriate for students of Ukrainian history. Nice condition though and prompt delivery.
If you want to know about Ukraine but don't read Ukrainian, this is the book for you. Beginning with the myths of pre-history and working up through 1999, Andrew Wilson gives the reader a sense of what it is to be Ukrainian. This is no easy task because Ukraine is a diverse place with a west that is totally different than its east, and with many regional differences in between. He calls it an unexpected nation because its ethnic, linguistic, religious and regional diversity makes it hard for many people to think of it as a single nation. He deals with the complex relationship Ukraine has with its eastern neighbor Russia. Many Ukrainians are of Russian descent and Russian is still the language spoken in many parts of the country. Both countries lay claim to Kyiv as their ancient capital and many of their ancient heroes are the same. Ukraine lies on the border between western Europe and Eurasian Russia. Its western people look to Europe for commerce and culture just as its eastern regions favor Russia.
Although its borders have changed as often as its political fate, Wilson does an admirable job of inclusion. He writes about Western Ukraine, the Crimea and the Donbas (eastern Ukraine) as well as the Ukraine of Kyiv. Often this makes the book difficult to read because so many different regions and their unique perspectives must be taken into consideration. Yet this is what ultimately makes the book so rewarding.
Although Wilson makes use of copious footnoting, most of his references are to Ukrainian language sources that will be inaccessible to his readers. He does an admirable job of introducing us to the major players in the shaping of this new nation; yet seeking out more on any particular aspect of the story may be difficult. Wilson does provide a fine Bibliographical Essay at the end of the book to further sources in English or other Western languages that will satisfy the interested reader seeking further information.
The book has many fine black-and-white maps that illustrate the points in the text. Also included are two sections of black-and-white and color plates that bring life to many of the ideas presented. At the beginning of the book is a Chronology with two separate time lines: one for Politics and History and the second for Culture. This helps to put the wealth of information presented into a structured framework.
The author focuses on economic, political and religious power and thought and the literary and artistic expression of these in fine arts and literature. His approach is chronological, working from ancient myths and their modern interpretations, through the history of the region, right on up to the present day and the 1998 elections. It would be marvelous if a new edition would come out that includes the results of the year 2000 elections.
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