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eBook Foucault's Virginity (The W. B. Stanford Memorial Lectures) epub

by Goldhill

eBook Foucault's Virginity (The W. B. Stanford Memorial Lectures) epub
  • ISBN: 0521479347
  • Author: Goldhill
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (January 27, 1995)
  • Pages: 212 pages
  • ePUB size: 1495 kb
  • FB2 size 1496 kb
  • Formats lrf azw mobi doc


Goldhill attempts to out-foucault Foucault. He makes a good case for reading "virginity" as a sly form of knowledge. Taking on the master this broadly is of course folly, but Goldhill does it so entertainingly and with enough rigor to potentially open a new line of discussion in this daunting arena.

Goldhill attempts to out-foucault Foucault. And I think that's just what Foucault intended, isn't it?

This lecture series was established by public subscription, to honour the memory of William Bedell Stanford, Regius Professor of Greek in Trinity College, Dublin, from 1940 to 1980, and Chancellor of the University of Dublin from 1982 to 1984.

This lecture series was established by public subscription, to honour the memory of William Bedell Stanford, Regius Professor of Greek in Trinity College, Dublin, from 1940 to 1980, and Chancellor of the University of Dublin from 1982 to 1984. VIRGINITY Ancient eroticfictionand the history of sexuality SIMON GOLDHILL Lecturer in Classics in the University of Cambridge, and Fellow of King's College. I Cambridge university press.

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The Stanford Mathematics Problem Book: With Hints and Solutions. Foucault's Virginity: Ancient Erotic Fiction and the History of Sexuality (The Stanford Memorial Lectures). George Polya, Jeremy Kilpatrick.

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Published volumes in the . Stanford Memorial Lecture series, Cambridge University Press. Peter Garnsey, Ideas of Slavery from Aristotle to Augustine, 1996. Simon Goldhill, Foucault's Virginity: Ancient Erotic Fiction and the History of Sexuality, 1995. Victoria Rimell, The Closure of Space in Roman Poetics: Empire’s Inward Turn, 2015. Johannes Haubold, Greece and Mesopotamia: Dialogues in Literature, 2013. The Stanford Memorial Lectures. Irish Institute of Hellenic Studies in Athens. Department of Classics Navigation.

Cambridge Core - Literary Theory - Foucault's Virginity - by Simon Goldhill. Foucault's Virginity. Ancient Erotic Fiction and the History of Sexuality. Series: The W. B. Stanford Memorial Lectures. Recommend to librarian. Online ISBN: 9780511627330.

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W. Cambridge University Press.

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This is a study of how sex and sexuality were written about in the first centuries of this era, a central period in the history of sexuality. Writing with the same wit and verve as the ancient writers he engages with, Simon Goldhill shows how the standard accounts of sexuality in this period are distorted by ignoring the sexy, ironic and often bizarre texts of the ancient novel, erotic poetry and humorous dialogues.
Comments: (3)
Braendo
In this extraordinarily helpful and didactic effort, Goldhill manages to convey both the necessary erudition to help readers grasp the importance of ancient Greek erotic fiction in the development of literary and societal trends that continue today, and the indispensable sense of wonder to help bridge the gap of two and a half millennia. It seems that every new generation thinks it has "invented" or discovered something new about sex, desire, and the controls that societies have imposed throughout time. This slim book is a great first step in debunking such ideas and is full of information about a part of literature that was intentionally neglected in our civilization for a long time, to the point that, when Daphnis and Chloe, for example, was finally translated into English, it was mangled so as not to provoke impure thoughts in its readers. A "modern" version that Goldhill mentions, from the early 20th century, includes text in Latin and not in English just in those descriptive parts that could "pollute" the minds of impressionable readers.

Even if readers are not much interested in Foucault's peculiar ideas about the development of historical trends, or in his take on Western attitudes regarding sexuality, Goldhill's text is useful because it complements Foucault and fills lacunae that the French philosopher left in his explorations of western attitudes towards sex. Also, together with Daphnis and Chloe, Goldhill concentrates on Leucippe and Cleitophon and on Amatorius, but there are useful forays into Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics, the Erotes (attributed to Lucian), Ovid's Ars Amatoria, Aeschylus's Agamemnon, and a very long list of known and not-so known literary works from the Ancient World that is always rewarding to read or re-read. Regarding this point, Goldhill book is a veritable treasure map for anyone interested in Ancient literature, with 10 pages of very useful Works Cited and 18 of notes that are full of references to further reading, both original sources and critical, modern texts.

I don't agree with Goldhill in his surprise at finding out that a [relatively] modern translator (Edmonds) chooses to include Latin in the text in order to save the less-cultured (those of us who cannot understand Latin) from the horrors of seduction and coitus on the page: that trick is an old one and translators and editors have been cheating readers for centuries, confronting them with a language that most readers don't know in order to keep the information from hoi-polloi. (In fact, Edmund Wilson's Memoirs of Hecate County [1946] has several pages in French because the author wrote it thus, and no edition I know of has bothered to translate that section into English.) I also think Goldhill falls into false exegesis when he pays too much importance to Thornley's 1657 translation of Daphnis and Chloe and, on top of it praises it too much, in spite of Thornley's unwarranted additions to the text, turning next to Turner's translation, to end up with Edmonds 20th century Loeb edition and the slippage into Latin in order to obscure the relatively explicit parts. Goldhill is a scholar who can render his own modern translations of the relevant texts and passages. He should have concentrated on those texts and left the translators for a long introduction or a separate chapter that tackled the problems of accurate translations when society's mores make such an enterprise impossible.

In spite of this, the author manages to convey a huge amount of information and to educate at the same time. He includes Greek text at the bottom of the page and transliterated Greek terms accompanying the body of the text on the page, as in "the art of prose (antigrapsai tei graphei)," or "a pseudoparthenos, a 'false' virgin,'" which constitutes a very fluid way to learn as one reads. One word of caution is that Goldhill's writing, while really entertaining and clear, is in a high register. Antithetical, misprision, aetiology and other such terms abound. But since the writing is engaging and instructive, it's almost surprising for those of us who enjoy these ancient texts to learn so much from a modern book that is slender, scholarly, fun to read, and moderately challenging.
Enila
Witty, compelling, brash, frustrating, thoughtful, and just downright fun. Goldhill attempts to out-foucault Foucault. He makes a good case for reading "virginity" as a sly form of knowledge.Taking on the master this broadly is of course folly, but Goldhill does it so entertainingly and with enough rigor to potentially open a new line of discussion in this daunting arena. And I think that's just what Foucault intended, isn't it?
Went Tyu
This tedious lingering on filth reflects Goldhill's perverted and cess-pit-like mind. There is an intelligent, sensitive tome to be written on this topic. This is not it. Shame on him. Shame.
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