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eBook Merleau-Ponty (The Routledge Philosophers) epub

by Taylor Carman

eBook Merleau-Ponty (The Routledge Philosophers) epub
  • ISBN: 0415339804
  • Author: Taylor Carman
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (September 12, 2008)
  • Pages: 288 pages
  • ePUB size: 1996 kb
  • FB2 size 1182 kb
  • Formats rtf lit doc mobi


If you're looking for a good introduction to Merleau-Ponty's thought for a general reader, this book is not as helpful as it could b. Carman clearly has a great knowledge of M-P and an interesting reading of the philosopher. This book could be much shorter and deeper.

If you're looking for a good introduction to Merleau-Ponty's thought for a general reader, this book is not as helpful as it could be. I don't think that there would be much understanding gained from Carman's "explanations" of Husserl and Gestalt psychology for all the ink spilled there if you weren't already familiar with these systems of thought.

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Maurice Jean Jacques Merleau-Ponty (French: ; 14 March 1908 – 3 May 1961) was a French phenomenological philosopher, strongly influenced by Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger. The constitution of meaning in human experience was his main interest and he wrote on perception, art, and politics.

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Taylor Carman A final chapter considers Merleau-Ponty’s importance today, examining his philosophy in light of. .

A final chapter considers Merleau-Ponty’s importance today, examining his philosophy in light of recent developments in philosophy of mind and cognitive science. Merleau-Ponty is essential reading for students of phenomenology, existentialism and Twentieth century philosophy. It is also ideal for anyone in the humanities and social sciences seeking an introduction to his work.

series The Routledge Philosophers. A final chapter considers Merleau-Ponty’s importance today, examining his philosophy in light of recent developments in philosophy of mind and cognitive science.

Merleau-Ponty enriches his classic work with engaging studies of famous .

Merleau-Ponty enriches his classic work with engaging studies of famous cases in the history of psychology and neurology as well as phenomena that continue to draw our attention, such as phantom limb syndrome, synesthesia, and hallucination. Foreword by Taylor Carman Maurice Merleau-Ponty by Claude Lefort, translated by Donald A. Landes Translator’s Introduction by Donald A. Landes. Phenomenology of Perception by Maurice Merleau-Ponty, translated by Donald A. Landes Bilingual Table of Contents Preface Introduction: Classical Prejudices and the Return to Phenomena.

Routledge Philosophers is a major series of introductions to the great Western philosophers. Each book places a major philosopher or thinker in historical context, explains and assesses their key arguments, and considers their legacy.

Maurice Merleau-Ponty is one of the most important philosophers of the Twentieth century. His theories of perception and the role of the body have had an enormous impact on the humanities and social sciences, yet the full scope of his. His theories of perception and the role of the body have had an enormous impact on the humanities and social sciences, yet the full scope of his contribution not only to phenomenology but philosophy generally is only now becoming clear. In this lucid and comprehensive introduction, Taylor Carman explains and assesses the full range of Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy.

Maurice Jean Jacques Merleau-Ponty (1908–1961), French philosopher .

Maurice Jean Jacques Merleau-Ponty (1908–1961), French philosopher and public intellectual, was the leading academic proponent of existentialism and phenomenology in post-war France.

Maurice Merleau-Ponty (1908-1961) is one of the most important philosophers of the Twentieth century. His theories of perception and the role of the body have had an enormous impact on the humanities and social sciences, yet the full scope of his contribution not only to phenomenology but philosophy generally is only now becoming clear. In this lucid and comprehensive introduction, Taylor Carman explains and assesses the full range of Merleau-Ponty’s philosophy.

Beginning with an overview of Merleau-Ponty’s life and work, subsequent chapters cover fundamental aspects of Merleau-Ponty’s thought, including his philosophy of perception and intentionality; the role of the body in relation to perception; philosophy of history and culture; and his writings on art and aesthetics, particularly the work of Cezanne. A final chapter considers Merleau-Ponty’s importance today, examining his philosophy in light of recent developments in philosophy of mind and cognitive science.

Merleau-Ponty is essential reading for students of phenomenology, existentialism and Twentieth century philosophy. It is also ideal for anyone in the humanities and social sciences seeking an introduction to his work.

Comments: (2)
Mightdragon
Merleau-Ponty's influence seems to me to be on the rise. While Merleau-Ponty's reputation was at first overshadowed a bit by Heidegger and Sartre I think Merleau-Ponty's ideas may wind up having more enduring relevance. Merleau-Ponty was primarily preoccupied with questions surrounding the nature of perception and the body. All the other aspects of his philosophy - including his analyses of art and politics - are offshoots of his phenomenology of perception and the lived body. Carman devotes the second and third chapters of his book to Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology of perception and the lived body. Together they comprise about 100 pages of a 230 page book. Personally, I would have preferred to have those sections take up an even larger proportion of the book, since they are so central, and they were, in my opinion, the best parts of the book. However, these Routledge introductions are meant to be fairly comprehensive and, I admit, it was nice to get a discussion of Merleau-Ponty's politics, which is not dealt with much in the secondary literature.

Carman's book is accessible, well-written, and interesting. I thought Carman did an especially good job explaining how important it was for Merleau-Ponty that perception is a bodily phenomenon and that perception opens upon a world. Carman makes it clear that, for Merleau-Ponty, perception is not a spectacle played before the mind, nor is it the relation between a subject and an object. There is a communion between the body and the world that exists before the separation of subject and object - we are of the same stuff as the world - and Carman's discussion of this aspect of Merleau-Ponty's thought helped me to understand Merleau-Ponty's later notion of the flesh. All in all, I would recommend Carman's book as a good intro to Merleau-Ponty's thought and I am very pleased with the slow proliferation of introductory secondary books on Merleau-Ponty. Lawrence Hass's book is another good place to start, I will be reading Romdenh-Romluc's book on the Phenomenology of Perception next, and I know Eric Matthews has two introductory books on Merleau-Ponty as well.

There were a couple of flaws of Carman's book as well. The first reviewer makes a valid point when he describes the book as a "rather jumbled survey." I think these Routledge introductory philosophy texts are required to be somewhat comprehensive so part of the problem is the format that is imposed by the series. While it is certainly nice to have a discussion of Merleau-Ponty's essays on art and history and politics, as opposed to a narrow focus on his phenomenology of perception, it does make the book feel a bit haphazard, and the early chapters on perception and the body are certainly the best sections in the book. I was also a little disappointed in what I took to be Carman's fairly easy dismissal of a number of Merleau-Ponty inspired philosophers in the last chapter of his book (Francisco Varela, Andy Clark, and Alva Noe). Carman is right that Merleau-Ponty would disagree with a great deal of what those philosophers have to say, but the fact that Varela, Clark, and Noe do not slavishly follow Merleau-Ponty, but instead are trying to solve their own philosophical problems, in light of recent develops in neuroscience and cognitive science, does not mean the influence of Merleau-Ponty on their thought is unreal. In a way, they are closer to Merleau-Ponty that Merleau-Ponty scholars who simply limit themselves to repeating what Merleau-Ponty said, since they are doing what Merleau-Ponty did, just as empirical scientists are closer to Aristotle than Scholastic commentators on his thought. Despite those complaints, I still wholeheartedly recommend Carman's book.
Usaxma
If you're looking for a good introduction to Merleau-Ponty's thought for a general reader, this book is not as helpful as it could be. I don't think that there would be much understanding gained from Carman's "explanations" of Husserl and Gestalt psychology for all the ink spilled there if you weren't already familiar with these systems of thought. Excursions into contemporary theories are also a bit out of place for a book that really should be focusing on explaining M-P. Carman jumps around within texts themselves, defining terms with quotations sometimes hundreds of pages apart. His own reading of M-P makes less of his purported shift than other scholars, but he doesn't cue readers in on the fact that he is pulling from different chapters in order to make his arguments. What readers--or this one, at least--are probably wanting is a walk through M-P's major texts; what we get is a rather jumbled survey that gives the impression that M-P himself was just as sloppy.
Carman clearly has a great knowledge of M-P and an interesting reading of the philosopher. This book could be much shorter and deeper.
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