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eBook THE CANADIANS epub

by Andrew H. Malcolm

eBook THE CANADIANS epub
  • ISBN: 081291158X
  • Author: Andrew H. Malcolm
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Crown; 1st edition (February 12, 1985)
  • Pages: 385 pages
  • ePUB size: 1271 kb
  • FB2 size 1784 kb
  • Formats azw txt lrf lrf


Andrew Malcolm’s The The Canadians live in one of the most beautiful, most prosperous, most peaceful, and safest countries on earth; and yet, paradoxically, and perhaps in part because of Canada’s beauty, prosperity, peacefulness, and safety, Canadians and the contributions they make to the world are often overlooked. Within the world community, Canada sometimes seems like the party guest who is so polite and self-effacing that he or she is found boring. How sad, and how short-sighted.

Alas, & not so with this Andrew Malcolm book. The Canadians" is the result. This is more travelogue than history. Malcolm makes it known to all that he is of Canadian ancestry, although he spent most of his life here in the . He mentions in the text that he taught history at a university and that he was a "Canadian Bureau Chief" at the New York Times. Despite his association with anything New York, he is still eminently qualified to do some serious work on Canada and the Canadian mentality. This is more travelogue than history

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by Andrew H. Malcolm. The second-largest country in the world, Canada was created by another foreign power for reasons of its own that had little to do with Canadian desires and nothing to do with natural geographical boundaries.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Canadians by Andrew H. Malcolm at the best online . Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside.

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'THE CANADIANS,'' by Andrew H. Malcolm, is not a pretty-picture book, all wilderness parks and icicles . Before writing this book, Mr. Malcolm spent four years in Canada as chief of the Toronto bureau of The New York Times. Malcolm, is not a pretty-picture book, all wilderness parks and icicles, nor is it a travel guide, all restaurants. Instead it's an ambitious, enthusiastic and wide-ranging study of a country recently thought, even by those who live there, to be unambitious, unenthusiastic and narrow-ranging. Instead of sitting comfortably in the awa triangle, as he could easily have done, he traveled the land by car, train, plane, dog sled and canoe, and numerous other modes of transportation, including foot.

Find nearly any book by Andrew H Malcolm. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. The Canadians: ISBN 9780312069216 (978-0-312-06921-6) Softcover, St. Martin's Griffin, 1991. ISBN 9780451148520 (978-0-451-14852-0) Softcover, Berkley, 1987. Find signed collectible books: 'Final Harvest'.

Andrew Malcolm (November 23, 1840 – August 9, 1915) was a Scottish-born manufacturer and political figure in Ontario, Canada. He represented Bruce Centre in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1898 to 1902 as a Liberal member. He was the father of Canadian politician and Minister of Trade and Commerce, James Malcolm. Andrew Malcolm was born on November 23, 1840 in Killearn, Scotland. He was the son of James Malcolm and Marion Duncan.

The essence of Canada's diversity is revealed in the interviews with the people and stories of the places that the former "New York Times" Canadian Bureau Chief visited during his extensive Canadian travels
Comments: (3)
Maveri
The author was born in Canada but grew up in the US. He takes his sons on a long trek through Canada to learn about his origins. What is this second-largest country that is Not-US? First Malcolm discusses the geography that shapes the country's history and challenges. Typically, the British who founded Canada didn't give a fig for geographical considerations. The population clings to the shallow souther border except for the native residents, the Inuit. Malcolm visits with a number of people to get a sense of the Canadian character, but the most interested segment is his stay with Snowbird, a native whose knowledge of dogs and the wilds is unparalleled. And his fundamental philosophy of life is elemental and honest.
The other interesting part of the book is about the vast differences between the provinces; gigantic Quebec, with its French-speaking population, the impoverished Maritimes that once were the most important part of Canada, the vast prairies and oilfields of Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Albert, and the rainforested British Columbia. Plus the unincorporated territories the Yukon and Northwest. Each is practically a country on its own, and it wasn't only Quebec that wanted to secede--so did Nova Scotia at one time.
While this is mostly a travelogue, it is an interesting view of Canada from one man's point of view. Interesting reading if not a factual history of Canada.
Qumenalu
My hopes for this book centered primarily around history. I wanted to get a good introduction to Canadian history from the earliest times to recent developments. Alas, `tis not so with this Andrew Malcolm book. Malcolm makes it known to all that he is of Canadian ancestry, although he spent most of his life here in the U.S. He mentions in the text that he taught history at a university and that he was a "Canadian Bureau Chief" at the New York Times. Despite his association with anything New York, he is still eminently qualified to do some serious work on Canada and the Canadian mentality. "The Canadians" is the result.
This is more travelogue than history. Malcolm spent four years rattling around Canada trying to get a feel for the country. The scope of the book is impressive. Malcolm examines geography, people, and economics to show his readers where Canadians have been, and where they are going. The chapter on geography is definitely illuminating. Most of us, especially here in the U.S., probably don't have an adequate idea of how huge Canada really is. Almost the entire population of Canada lives right along the border. Behind them stretches an amount of territory that is amazing to behold. Even all of the provinces of Canada are enormous. Most of the provinces could hold several major U.S. states within their boundaries with room to spare. The northern regions, namely the Yukon and the Northwest Territories (isn't it known as Nunavit now?) are almost beyond description, with many areas unexplored by man. The task that Canada has had since its inception has been making use of the vast resources within these regions while preserving the fragile environment. Most of the natural gas mined here goes to other places, such as the U.S. Actually, most of the stuff scraped, panned, cut or dug goes other places, as Canada's main source of economic livelihood is trade. Of course, the U.S. is Canada's biggest trading partner, with billions of dollars of goods flowing across the border. The U.S reciprocates this trade. This trade and emphasis on Canada's economic condition is detailed by Malcolm in his chapter on Canadian economics. Malcolm spends a huge amount of page space showing how Canadian business has moved into the U.S., buying up real estate and companies with impunity. The Canadian banking system is discussed in detail (it's monolithic) as is the growing trade relationships with Japan and the Pacific Rim. The best factoids from this section: Canadian beer. Most of the Canadian beer we see in the U.S. isn't even available in most of Canada due to strict production laws at the provincial level. Buying alcoholic beverages in Canada is a bit different, too. Special stores are set up strictly for alcohol. People go in and order what they want from the clerk. The drinks then come through the wall on a conveyor belt. I laughed when I read this because I remembered the scene in "Strange Brew" when Bob and Doug went to the liquor store and tried to claim they found a mouse in a beer bottle.
Malcolm spends a lot of time discussing the psychology of Canadians. It seems that most Canadians suffer from living in the shadow of the U.S. Canadians are quick to criticize the United States, even though they benefit from our presence. They also seem to suffer from an inferiority complex. Canadians are less competitive and less willing to attempt new things for fear of failure. They don't want to toot their own horn, but they hate criticism of their culture and country. Malcolm also makes much out of the regionalism of Canadians. Due to the vast geography and inclement conditions, Canadians tend to stick closer to home and have not developed the type of national unity that the U.S. or other countries have come to take for granted.
Malcolm has a great love for Canada, although some of his writing has an "aw, shucks" mentality to it that can be annoying at times. His descriptions of life in the Arctic Circle are fascinating and informative. I give this book three stars, not because it isn't good, but because it wasn't what I was looking for. To be fair, that's more my fault than his.
Cheber
I,WE BOUGHT THIS BOOK IN HOPES THAT WE COULD LEARN SOME BASICS ON CANADIAN WAYS BEFORE VENTURING INOT CANADA TO START, SHARE SOME INCREDIBLE BUSINESS OPPORTUNITES WITH THE CANADIANS AS NOW PARTNERS WITH THE USA IN A GROWING INTERNATIONAL MOVEMENT.
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