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eBook The Jivaro: People of the Sacred Waterfalls epub

by Michael J. Harner

eBook The Jivaro: People of the Sacred Waterfalls epub
  • ISBN: 0520050657
  • Author: Michael J. Harner
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of California Press; 1st edition (September 25, 1984)
  • Pages: 239 pages
  • ePUB size: 1482 kb
  • FB2 size 1682 kb
  • Formats azw docx lit txt


Harner's Jivaro is a very interesting book. This book is one of the most fascinating ethnographies I have read.

Harner's Jivaro is a very interesting book. What utterly fascinated me was the description of how this state of affairs came about

It was this quality that particularly attracted me when I went to study their way of life in 1956-57 and I was most fortunate, at that time, to find, especially east of the Cordillera de Cutucli, a portion of the Jivaro still unconquered and still.

It was this quality that particularly attracted me when I went to study their way of life in 1956-57 and I was most fortunate, at that time, to find, especially east of the Cordillera de Cutucli, a portion of the Jivaro still unconquered and still living, with some changes, their traditional life style. This book is about their culture. University of California Press, 13 сент.

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Only one tribe of American Indians is known ever to have successfully revolted against the empire of Spain and to have thwarted all subsequent attempts by the Spaniards to reconquer them: the Jivaro (hee'-va-ro), the untsuri suarii of eastern Ecuador. From 1599 onward they remained unconquered in their forest fastness east of the Andes, despite the fact that they were known to occupy one of the richest placer gold deposit regions in all of South America.

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This book is about their culture. The Jivaro People of the Sacred Waterfalls. Additional Product Features. Place of Publication. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 7 brand new listings. History: Specific Subjects.

Harner, Michael J. (1972) The Jívaro: People of the Sacred Waterfalls. New York: Natural History Press. Harner, Michael J. (1968) "The Sound of Rushing Water. Natural History 77(6). Harner, Michael . ed. and contributor (1973) Hallucinogens and Shamanism. New York and London: Oxford University Press. Haviland, William . Harald E. L. Prins, Bunny McBride and Dana Walrath (2013). Anthropologists of Note: Michael J. Harner

oceedings{Harner1972TheJP, title {The Jivaro: People of the Sacred Waterfalls}, author {Michael J. Harner}, year . Introduction Orthography I. The Jivaro: Background II. Shelter, Subsistence, and Technology III.

oceedings{Harner1972TheJP, title {The Jivaro: People of the Sacred Waterfalls}, author {Michael J. Harner}, year {1972} }. Harner. Social Relations IV. The Hidden World V. Law, Feuding, and War VI. Cultural Change Epilogue Bibliography Notes Index.

Only one tribe of American Indians is known ever to have successfully revolted against the empire of Spain and to have thwarted all subsequent attempts by the Spaniards to reconquer them: the Jivaro (hee'-va-ro), the untsuri suarii of eastern Ecuador. From 1599 onward they remained unconquered in their forest fastness east of the Andes, despite the fact that they were known to occupy one of the richest placer gold deposit regions in all of South America. Tales of their fierceness became part of the folklore of Latin America, and their warlike reputation spread in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries when Jivaro "shrunken head" trophies, tsantsa, found their way to the markets of exotica in the Western world. As occasional travelers visited them in the first decades of this century, the Jivaro also became known not as just a warlike group, but as an individualistic people intensely jealous of their freedom and unwilling to be subservient to authority, even among themselves. It was this quality that particularly attracted me when I went to study their way of life in 1956-57 and I was most fortunate, at that time, to find, especially east of the Cordillera de Cutucli, a portion of the Jivaro still unconquered and still living, with some changes, their traditional life style.  This book is about their culture. 
Comments: (7)
Leniga
Excellent overview of the Jivaro people, thier culture, customs and a must if your interested in cultural use of Ayahuasca psychoactive plants by Shamanic practicioners.
Jorius
Great.
Onnell
good copy dust jacket
Coiron
Good read. Really great short ethnography. Very entertaining and interesting. Worth reading. I learned a lot about Ecuador with this book.
Grokinos
Harner's Jivaro is a very interesting book. I cannot attest to the ethnographic veracity of the text as some other reviewers, but I can speak to what I thought about the book. This book is one of the most fascinating ethnographies I have read. It is very "sexy": violence, drugs, death, decapitation, shrunken heads...edgy stuff. What utterly fascinated me was the description of how this state of affairs came about. Harner claims that head-hunting raids didn't take place, or at least not with the frequency as reported in this book until the introduction of firearms by the Spanish. At this point rival tibes were better able to kill each other, and violence increased. I found it all very interesting, and would recommend it.
Marg
The title is good -- the Shuar (Jivaro) indeed have a special reverence for sacred waterfalls -- but the rest of the book captures little of the true flavor of Shuar culture and character. (I spent several months among the Shuar many years ago.) As an example, Nunkui is the spirit of Earth when referred to as a living being, but the author refers to Nunkui as "a female crop fairy." Even if one does not speak Shuar, the relationship of the word "Nunkui" to the word "Nunka" (land or territory) should be obvious. There is much superficial observation in this book but very little true insight.
Yozshubei
Michael Harner's "Jivaro" documents a society marked by excessive use of hallucinogenic stimulants. I read this book to fulfill a class assignment. It's going to take a whole lot of acid to get me to read it again.
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