» » When Is Discrimination Wrong?

eBook When Is Discrimination Wrong? epub

by Deborah Hellman

eBook When Is Discrimination Wrong? epub
  • ISBN: 0674027973
  • Author: Deborah Hellman
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press (May 30, 2008)
  • Pages: 216 pages
  • ePUB size: 1420 kb
  • FB2 size 1153 kb
  • Formats lrf txt doc azw


Deborah Hellman has produced one of the most thoughtful and engaging works on equality I know, beautifully written and meticulously argued

Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Deborah Hellman has produced one of the most thoughtful and engaging works on equality I know, beautifully written and meticulously argued. Louis Michael Seidman, Professor of Constitutional Law, Georgetown University. In a thoughtful analysis, Hellman argues that discrimination is a demeaning speech-act, and is wrongful on these grounds rather than in virtue of its motivation or effects.

In this boldly conceived book, Deborah Hellman develops a much-needed general theory of discrimination. Hellman argues that, in the end, distinguishing among people on the basis of traits is wrong when it demeans any of the people affected. She deftly explores the question of how we determine what is in fact demeaning.

In When is Discrimination Wrong? Deborah Hellman has taken on the important and difficult task of trying to establish logically consistent . Read Hellman's book as a very competent spur to thinking through for yourself the issues involved in appropriate and inappropriate discrimination.

In When is Discrimination Wrong? Deborah Hellman has taken on the important and difficult task of trying to establish logically consistent rules for determining just where in that fuzzy territory the line between legitimate and illegitimate discrimination should be drawn. Hellman's writing is clear and engaging, her examples relevant to the daily lives of many. There'll probably be a fly in the ointment of the thesis you come up with too, but the process of thinking it all through can only be good for us all.

When is Discrimination Wrong? Deborah Hellman, University of Maryland School of Law. Document Type Book. When is Discrimination Wrong? (2008). This paper has been withdrawn.

Equal Protection in the Key of Respect, 123 YALE L. J. 3036 (2014) (symposium issue). Defining Corruption and Constitutionalizing Democracy, 111 MICH.

When Is Discrimination Wrong. This article addresses the question whether recent state legislation that forbids discrimination on the basis of genetic information by health insurers or employers is warranted. Critics of thes. More). Introduction: The Discrimination Puzzle Part I: When is Discrimination Wrong? The Basic Idea Demeaning and Wrongful Discrimination Interpretation and Disagreement Part II: Considerin.

Город: Charlottesville, VAПодписчиков: 711О себе: Law Professor at aw, writing on di. .

Город: Charlottesville, VAПодписчиков: 711О себе: Law Professor at aw, writing on discrimination and the relationship between money and rights. When is Discrimination Wrong? (HUP).

A law requires black bus passengers to sit in the back of the bus. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves a drug for use by black heart failure patients. A state refuses to license drivers under age 16. A company avoids hiring women between the ages of 20 and 40. We routinely draw distinctions among people on the basis of characteristics that they possess or lack. While some distinctions are benign, many are morally troubling.

In this boldly conceived book, Deborah Hellman develops a much-needed general theory of discrimination. She demonstrates that many familiar ideas about when discrimination is wrong—when it is motivated by prejudice, grounded in stereotypes, or simply departs from merit-based decision-making—won’t adequately explain our widely shared intuitions.

Hellman argues that, in the end, distinguishing among people on the basis of traits is wrong when it demeans any of the people affected. She deftly explores the question of how we determine what is in fact demeaning.

Claims of wrongful discrimination are among the most common moral claims asserted in public and private life. Yet the roots of these claims are often left unanalyzed. When Is Discrimination Wrong? explores what it means to treat people as equals and thus takes up a central problem of democracy.

Comments: (2)
Narim
"Isn't discrimination always wrong?" That's what people say when they see the deliberately provocative title of this book. Of course in reality the issue isn't so simple. Is it wrong for the FDA to approve a particular drug for African Americans specifically if it addresses a health problems of that population? Is it wrongful discrimination for a nursing home for women to only hire women as attendants? Most of us know wrongful discrimination when we see it: separate but equal; blacks forced to sit at the back of the bus; ethnic quotas on immigration; glass ceilings, etc... But what is it precisely that makes wrongful discrimination wrong? How does that apply to the vague and thorny gray areas where all the trouble lies?

Deborah Hellman does a terrific job of framing the problem, summarizing existing scholarship and legal theory on the subject, and then coming to her own conclusions. She very clearly puts each theoretical argument in its place and then draws an all encompassing frame around them - a bedrock principle that cuts to the heart of the issue and neatly addresses its core. She states it clearly at the conclusion of Chapter 1: "Discrimination is wrong when it demeans. To demean is to treat another as less worthy." She spends the rest of the book precisely defining her terms (for example membership in a stigmatized group matters) and carefully examining alternatives and counter arguments. By bringing everything back to a simple moral principle her work feels in spirit akin to those of the framers of the constitution. It's that kind of clear and powerful thinking: reduction to first principles; simple truths that we hold to be self evident.

Hellman's analysis is deep. She addresses case law, sure, but also sociology and philosophy (both semantics and moral). We hear from Irving Goffman John Hart Ely, Owen Fiss, Catherine McKinnon, Ronald Dworkin, Christopher McCrudden, Brian Leiter, and many others. She addresses the issue of the role of group identity (both in terms of history of mistreatment and social disadvantage and to how it relates to offense against the individual versus just the group as a whole). She addresses the question of merit as a form of positive discrimination - devotes a whole chapter to it, defining the limits of the various approaches and how her central thesis puts limits on how drawing merit distinctions should be used. This is a short, dense, book. Hellman's language is economical. The subject requires abstract thinking quite often, which is difficult. Hellman bends over backwards to help you keep the fine distinctions in focus, frequently summarizing, reviewing, and restating her conclusions.

To say that this book influenced my perception of the issue is an understatement. It certainly educated me on the issue of wrongful discrimination and I will never again be able to view the issue without considering her analysis. However, her argument is so pervasive and well organized that its instructional power extends beyond just the topic at hand - it is really a clinic on how to think about any moral issue. Highly recommended.
Very Old Chap
I thought it would deal with discrimination in general, covering different practical cases, but basically the book aims to say that it's wrong to discriminate black people and women. If you already know that then there's not much you could learn from this book. Save your money.
eBooks Related to When Is Discrimination Wrong?
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020