» » The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat As Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of The Marquis de Sade (or Marat Sade)

eBook The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat As Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of The Marquis de Sade (or Marat Sade) epub

by Peter Weiss

eBook The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat As Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of The Marquis de Sade (or Marat Sade) epub
  • ISBN: 1577662318
  • Author: Peter Weiss
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Waveland Pr Inc (December 1, 2001)
  • Pages: 128 pages
  • ePUB size: 1259 kb
  • FB2 size 1471 kb
  • Formats mobi lrf mobi txt


At first glance, "Marat/Sade" is simply a play within a play. Corday whipping Sade has become the most infamous scene of the drama, yet Sade's lengthy monologues with Marat are sublime.

At first glance, "Marat/Sade" is simply a play within a play. The inmates act out the final days of Marat, while Sade orchestrates the action from outside. The common people- who have withstood the French Revolution and the rise of Napoleon without any noticeable improvement of their lot in life- begin to rebel against the play itself. They either rehash censored bits or stray from the script itself. I was unsurprised to learn that the playwright, Peter Weiss, was a Marxist. The play is all about revolutions.

Marat and de Sade are foils for presenting different points of view on the French revolution (as well as critiquing today’s society). One of Marat’s laments: We invented the Revolution but we don’t know how to run it. Look, everyone wants to keep something from the pas. souvenir of the old regim. his man decides to keep a paintin. his one couldn’t part with his shipyar. his one kept his army, and that one keeps his king, and so we stand here and write into the declaration of the rights of man the holy right of propert. e stand.

The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade (German: Die Verfolgung und Ermordung Jean Paul Marats dargestellt durch die Schauspielgruppe des . .

The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade (German: Die Verfolgung und Ermordung Jean Paul Marats dargestellt durch die Schauspielgruppe des Hospizes zu Charenton unter Anleitung des Herrn de Sade), usually shortened to Marat/Sade (pronounced ), is a 1963 play by Peter Weiss. The work was first published in German.

Director Christopher McElroen never lends Marat/Sade the control that would reward its chaos. Presented by the Classical Theatre of Harlem at the Harlem School of the Arts Theatre, 647 St. Nicholas Ave. NYC. Feb. 15 - March 11. Moments meant to threaten gravely or even temporarily shatter the play within the play don't register here, where separate realities combine into a lulling din. Also confused is the production's relationship to the audience, who are implicated by the set and occasional jets from a water hose but whose role McElroen never decides.

Translation of: Die Verfolgung und Ermordung Jean Paul Marats dargestellt durch die Schauspielgruppe des Hospizes zu Charenton unter Anleitung des Herrn de Sade. Includes music written for the British production by .

Marquis de Sade Abbé de Coulmier Jean-Paul Marat Simonne Evrard Charlotte Corday Duperret Jacques Roux .

Marquis de Sade Abbé de Coulmier Jean-Paul Marat Simonne Evrard Charlotte Corday Duperret Jacques Roux The Herald Kokol Polpoch Cucurucu Rossignol. Mme Coulmier Mlle Coulmier Male Nurses Asylum inmates Sisters Musicians In 2011, the Royal Shakespeare Company staged a revival of the play as part of the company's 50th anniversary celebrations

In the asylum, de Sade (Magee) has written a play, to be performed by inmates under his own direction and staged before an invited audience: a dialectic on revolution argued between Marat (Richardson) and de Sade himself, its performance continually interrupted by the director.

In the asylum, de Sade (Magee) has written a play, to be performed by inmates under his own direction and staged before an invited audience: a dialectic on revolution argued between Marat (Richardson) and de Sade himself, its performance continually interrupted by the director of the asylum (Rose) demanding certain excisions. There was much critical hostility to the film when it was first released, based on the premise that Brook had ruined his own stage production by isolating details for emphasis at the expense of an overall tableau effect

The inmates assault their keepers and the audience and their barely supressed capacity for violence is released. Production: Marat Sade/United Artists.

The inmates assault their keepers and the audience and their barely supressed capacity for violence is released. Paradoxically, though film is supposed to be a more ‘intimate’ medium, the play is more remote on film. The gain, however, is that the viewer’s attention is riveted on the speeches. Performances are uniformly excellent. There are several moments in the film that make the hair bristle and skin crawl.

Peter Weiss’ 1963 classic exploration of madness, history, and revolution takes on new resonance this fall. At Charenton Asylum, the inmates reenact the final days of the French Revolution for the visiting director and his upper-class family. With found instruments, props, and imaginative costumes, the production uses song and story to craft a parable about the delights and dangers of revolutionary action. This production contains adult content, including mob and individual violence and a scene of sexual assault, and is intended for mature audiences only.

This extraordinary play, which swept Europe before coming to America, is based on two historical truths: the infamous Marquis de Sade was confined in the lunatic asylum of Charenton, where he staged plays; and the revolutionary Jean-Paul Marat was stabbed in a bathtub by Charlotte Corday at the height of the Terror during the French Revolution. But this play-within-a-play is not historical drama. Its thought is as modern as today's police states and The Bomb; its theatrical impact has everywhere been called a major innovation. It is total theatre: philosophically problematic, visually terrifying. It engages the eye, the ear, and the mind with every imaginable dramatic device, technique, and stage picture, even including song and dance. All the forces and elements possible to the stage are fused in one overwhelming experience. This is theatre such as has rarely been seen before. The play is basically concerned with the problem of revolution. Are the same things true for the masses and for their leaders? And where, in modern times, lie the borderlines of sanity?
Comments: (7)
Wanenai
Way back in the ‘70’s, there was one avant-garde theater in Atlanta, located, fittingly enough, in an old warehouse in the downtown area, with the subject name. For me, seeing every play produced there was de rigueur, and that is where I first saw this memorable play. I decided to read it this time. In part, and no doubt the current Presidential campaign is serving as a catalyst, it raises that frequent quip: Are the only sane ones inside the asylum? I found that so many of the lines still reverberated across the decades.

The play (which has also been made into a movie) is based on the true events that occurred in France in 1793, during the period of the French revolution. As the full title indicates, the play depicts the assassination of one of the leaders and firebrands of the revolution, Jean-Paul Marat, by Charlotte Corday, who was of the Girondist faction within the revolution, and had come from Caen, in Normandy, to do the deed. She acted alone. She knifed him in his bath, where he had to sit for hours due to a debilitating skin condition. She was guillotined four days later.

Peter Weiss, the plays author, has the above events portrayed – brilliantly in my opinion – by actors playing the part of the inmates of the insane asylum at Charenton, which used to exist, outside of Paris. In the play, the reenactment of the assassination is directed by the Marquis de Sade (yes, the one whose name now denotes painful sexual acts), who, in real life, spent 13 years incarcerated in Charenton. The play is set in 1808, and nominally at least, the events are well-settled “ancient history,” but many of the lines in the play were relevant to the political and social conditions of 1808 … as well as 2016.

Weiss skillfully uses three different “overall views” of the action, which are woven together, presenting contradictory points of view with delicious irony. There is a “Herald,” who omniscience of the action fulfills the same role as the ancient Greek chorus. One of the Herald’s quips, appropriate today as it was in 1808: “Work for and trust the powerful few, what’s best for them is best for you.” “Coulmier” is the asylum’s director, a “liberal” barely 5% to the left of center. He states that the play will be good therapy for the inmates… but, of course, they are not allowed to say anything too radical, and he is repeatedly rebuking de Sade for including portions that “they had agreed to cut.” One rebuke: “That’s enough. We’re living in eighteen hundred and eight and the names which were dragged through the gutter then have been deservedly rehabilitated by the command of the Emperor.” And there is the overview of de Sade himself as he tries to direct the action.

Marat and de Sade are foils for presenting different points of view on the French revolution (as well as critiquing today’s society). One of Marat’s laments: “We invented the Revolution but we don’t know how to run it. Look, everyone wants to keep something from the past… a souvenir of the old regime… this man decides to keep a painting… this one couldn’t part with his shipyard… this one kept his army, and that one keeps his king, and so we stand here and write into the declaration of the rights of man the holy right of property… we stand here more oppressed than when we began and they think that the revolution’s been won.” Or later, “And you still long to ape them those powered chimpanzees Necker Lafayette Talleyrand.”

The music is great too, with witty verses. The classic that has reverberated across the decades: “And what’s the point of a revolution without general copulation copulation copulation.” Yes, ‘Make love, not war’ repackaged. A sentiment for our age too. 5-stars, plus.
Ttyr
Weiss' play should be in everybody's "books to read before I die" lists! It is philosophical, intriguing, and taps into true human nature. The question of humanity's sanity and the the existence of classism is explored. Anyone who reads this, not watches it on youtube, will definitely enjoy the intellect Weiss brings to his characters and their conversations (especially those between Marat and de Sade).

The reason why I give it a four star is because the binding isn't all that great.
Fesho
I saw the play years ago and later it was made into a film, both were terrific. I was thinking about it the other day and wanted to read it now after all those intervening years. It is still holds up. As far as I am concerned it is a classic work, and theatre at its best.
Marg
Having read this play, which i have meant to do for many years, I viewed the British production from the 1960s on youtube. Incredibly powerful theatre. One cannot understand contemporary modern theatre without reading and viewing this seminal play.
crazy mashine
For a fuller appreciation of this work, find the filmed version of the play. A timely work very much applicable to life here in the land of the free.
นℕĨĈტℝ₦
Read it for a drama class. Very weird.
Zavevidi
This was the exact copy of this script that I wanted. I was in this play many years ago and wanted a copy of the exact script we had used. For a used book this old, the book was in excellent condition.
Very good play that will get an audience to think more deeply about the results of revolutions throughout the world. Not a play for young audiences but a great play for a college to preform.
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