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eBook The Changing Face of China: From Mao to Market epub

by John Gittings

eBook The Changing Face of China: From Mao to Market epub
  • ISBN: 0192806122
  • Author: John Gittings
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1st Edition edition (September 23, 2005)
  • Pages: 372 pages
  • ePUB size: 1645 kb
  • FB2 size 1732 kb
  • Formats txt doc azw mobi


He has also taught at the Polytechnic of Central London.

He has also taught at the Polytechnic of Central London. His books include works on Chinese foreign policy, military affairs, politics, and domestic society.

Changing Face of China book. From Mao to the global market, Gittings charts this complex but epic tale and concludes with some hard questions for the future.

Books related to The Changing Face of China. The Cultural Revolution.

From Mao to the global market, Gittings charts this complex but epic tale and concludes with some hard questions for the future. 12 - 13 Hours to read. Books related to The Changing Face of China. What Does China Think?

Thursday, December 06, 2012. John Gittings - The Changing Face of China. Gittings argues that before the 1980s China was a socialist state. It is not clear what he means by socialist in this context.

Thursday, December 06, 2012. Barely a day goes by without some newspaper including an article on China. Subtitled, "From Mao to Market", this 2005 book covers modern Chinese history and attempts to explain how China is now one of the foremost world economies when, only a few decades back the country was effectively isolated from the world economy, while its leaders preached socialism.

The Changing Face of China provides a wonderfully written rich tapestry of a nation in which everything has changed and is likely .

The Changing Face of China provides a wonderfully written rich tapestry of a nation in which everything has changed and is likely to continue to change. -John Bryan Starr, The Historian. The best single-volume history of the People's Republic of China from 1949 to the present. -Rana Mitter, author of A Bitter Revolution: China's Struggle with the Modern World.

John Gittings is the author of THE GLORIOUS ART OF PEACE: FROM THE ILIAD TO IRAQ (OUP, 2012). My last book was The Changing Face of China: From Mao to Market (2005), also published by Oxford University Press.

He has been a fellow of the Transnational Institute. He was educated at Midhurst Grammar School (1950–56), the School of Oriental & African Studies (1957–58), and Corpus Christi College, Oxford, (1958–61).

Gittings, a veteran Western journalist long based in Hong Kong and then Shanghai, has .

Gittings, a veteran Western journalist long based in Hong Kong and then Shanghai, has written a vivid history of Communist China. Drawing on his firsthand experience, he recaptures the simultaneous absurdity and utopian idealism of the Mao era and depicts the conflicting sentiments of China-watchers as they observed the power struggles of that time. Troubled by his belief that. Moving forward to the post-Mao era, he offers a history of China's economic rise that is more than just a chronicle of production statistics. He includes, for example, the production of China's writers and poets.

The Changing Face of China From Mao to Market Gittings Oxford Academ 9780192807342 : Where is China heading in the 21st century? Can its Communist Party survive or is it being challenged by g. Описание: This book examines the development of education in China over the past three decades, exploring the ways in which the manifold & both within and between policy prescriptions, pedagogical theory and classroom implementation have been handled where issues of political socialisation, national identification and public morality are at stake.

Where is China heading in the 21st century? Can its Communist Party survive? Will the US and China cooperate or compete in a dangerous future? Will China's economic boom be brought to a halt by environmental catastrophe? In this highly readable account, veteran journalist John Gittings sheds much light on modern Chinese history as he answers these vital questions. Gittings, the Guardian's China specialist and East Asia editor for twenty years, offers a fascinating glimpse into Chinese history in the last half century, ranging from the early Peach-Blossom socialism, to the Great Leap Forward, the two Cultural Revolutions, the Hundred Flowers, the Gang of Four, and the Tiananmen Square massacre. He shows how China has undergone not one but two revolutions in the 60 years since Mao Zedong took the road to victory. The first revolution swept away the old corrupt society and sought to build a 'spotless' new socialism behind closed doors; the second, since Mao's death, has focused on an economic agenda which accepts the goals of global capitalism. Bringing his narrative to the present, Gittings concludes that environmental degradation and rising pollution represent the most serious threats to the Chinese people today. The nightmare scenario for China is not a collapse of the Party or of the banks, or that the rural masses will once again surround the towns as they did in the revolution. It is that China will run out of water. Based on his three decades reporting on China, as a witness to all the major events from the Cultural Revolution onwards, Gittings here charts a complex but epic history of one of the world's superpowers. "A fine and timely book.... It will be an invaluable source to those wishing to understand recent events in China." --Times Educational Supplement "A stringent and incisive analysis of four shattering decades." --Guardian
Comments: (7)
Ynonno
Book is not written in an easy to follow manner. Sort of jumps around a lot. Very informative but not well structured.
Wenyost
one of my favorite books
Der Bat
I found this book to be a hard read. It appears to be a pastiche of previously written articles, with a bit of glue to tie them together. It thus jumps back and forth in time abd subject. For example, an early chapter mentions the overthrow of the Gang of Four, with no explanation. Several chapters later we finally get a description of how this happened. There is a swirl of Chinese names, most mentioned without any description of who this person is. I found the results to be pretty confusing. After reading it I still don't have a clear idea of a timeline of events.
Gardataur
As others have noted, this isn't a "history" per se, and shouldn't be taken as such. It's fast-paced, informed journalism that keeps its focus throughout and, in my opinion, offers a number of excellent critiques and observations of the current social climate in China. Reading it on the train from Beijing to Xi'an, I found myself constantly nodding along as I discovered different ways of making sense of what I was seeing there.
NI_Rak
Very good book.
Arith
I liked this book for its analysis of political phenomena. However, I found it weak on issues facing companies today in China or that the new business economy has created: There was little or no discussion of the institutional problems facing China in its transition. The journalistic background of the author also peeked through and some sections were too breathless for me. I disagree with the simplistic conclusion (among others) that water and pollution are the two major problems facing companies operating in China.
INvait
book in very good condition.
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