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eBook Unfree Labor: American Slavery and Russian Serfdom (Belknap Press) epub

by Peter Kolchin

eBook Unfree Labor: American Slavery and Russian Serfdom (Belknap Press) epub
  • ISBN: 0674920988
  • Author: Peter Kolchin
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Belknap Press (March 1, 1990)
  • Pages: 534 pages
  • ePUB size: 1825 kb
  • FB2 size 1447 kb
  • Formats rtf doc lrf lit


Unfree Labor will stand the test of time much as Jerome Blum's Lord and Peasant in Russia and Kenneth Stampp's The Peculiar Institution have for serfdom and slavery respectively.

Unfree Labor will stand the test of time much as Jerome Blum's Lord and Peasant in Russia and Kenneth Stampp's The Peculiar Institution have for serfdom and slavery respectively.

Unfree Labor: American Slavery and Russian Serfdom (Belknap Press). Download (pdf, 5. 1 Mb) Donate Read.

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Kolchin's book is a work of staggering erudition as regards the literature and sources concerning both Russian serfdom and American slavery. His comparative study offers significant insight into both systems of bondage

Kolchin's book is a work of staggering erudition as regards the literature and sources concerning both Russian serfdom and American slavery. His comparative study offers significant insight into both systems of bondage. There is nothing remotely comparable in the literature in Russian or English, and Kolchin's writing is always lucid. Comparative history is a tricky business and Unfree Labor succeeds where many previous ventures into this genre have failed

Two massive systems of unfree labor arose, a world apart from each other, in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth .

Two massive systems of unfree labor arose, a world apart from each other, in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The American enslavement of blacks and the Russian subjection of serfs flourished in different ways and varying degrees until they were legally abolished in the mid-nineteenth century.

Unfree Labor: American S. .has been added to your Basket. Kolchin's book is a work of staggering erudition as regards the literature and sources concerning both Russian serfdom and American slavery. Comparative history is a tricky business and Unfree Labor succeeds where many previous ventures into this genre have failed

Yet there are obvious contrasts also. The book is structured so as to make constant comparison; there are six large chapters each dealing with given subjects in a comparative perspective. The American and Russian cases are not, in other words, separated and compartmentalised.

The American enslavement of blacks and the Russian subjection of serfs .

book by Peter Kolchin. Two massive systems of unfree labor arose, a world apart from each other, in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries.

Russian serf-owners were often absentee landlords whose service .

Russian serf-owners were often absentee landlords whose service obligations or cultural preferences led them to reside in cities, leaving their estates in the hands of estate managers or even of the peasant commune itself. and London: Harvard University Press, 1987. lt;/p

May 25, 2011 John rated it it was amazing.

Published March 1st 1990 by Belknap Press (first published March 1st 1987). Unfree Labor: American Slavery and Russian Serfdom (Belknap Press). 0674920988 (ISBN13: 9780674920989). May 25, 2011 John rated it it was amazing.

Two massive systems of unfree labor arose, a world apart from each other, in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The American enslavement of blacks and the Russian subjection of serfs flourished in different ways and varying degrees until they were legally abolished in the mid-nineteenth century. Historian Peter Kolchin compares and contrasts the two systems over time in this magisterial book, which clarifies the organization, structure, and dynamics of both social entities, highlighting their basic similarities while pointing out important differences discernible only in comparative perspective.

These differences involved both the masters and the bondsmen. The independence and resident mentality of American slaveholders facilitated the emergence of a vigorous crusade to defend slavery from outside attack, whereas an absentee orientation and dependence on the central government rendered serfholders unable successfully to defend serfdom. Russian serfs, who generally lived on larger holdings than American slaves and faced less immediate interference in their everyday lives, found it easier to assert their communal autonomy but showed relatively little solidarity with peasants outside their own villages; American slaves, by contrast, were both more individualistic and more able to identify with all other blacks, both slave and free.

Kolchin has discovered apparently universal features in master-bondsman relations, a central focus of his study, but he also shows their basic differences as he compares slave and serf life and chronicles patterns of resistance. If the masters had the upper hand, the slaves and serfs played major roles in shaping, and setting limits to, their own bondage.

This truly unprecedented comparative work will fascinate historians, sociologists, and all social scientists, particularly those with an interest in comparative history and studies in slavery.

Comments: (2)
Vrion
The great question for me was how did Serfdom end in Russia in a seemingly peaceful way while it took a massive war to accomplish in the US. This work provides answers to this question and many others. A very worth while read
Chilele
If comparative histories are rare, part of the blame may fall on Prof. Peter Kolchin, because his "Unfree Labor" sets an extraordinary standard. Much of what he says about American slavery is a reprise of his own book by the same title, but readers new to the topic will gain from the treatment here. For me, his discussions of Russian serfdom were revelatory, and on their own justified the book's purchase.

But what really sets the book apart is the dissection of the similarities and differences between these two contemporaneous institutions. This is an ambitious project, and Kolchin casts a vast net to carry it off. His analyses consider geography, agricultural markets, folk tales, the ratio of bondsmen to owners, and the rise of state power. He deftly examines the disparate origins of serf and slave populations -- the one an indigenous majority, the other a displaced minority. Kolchin often illuminates his comparisons with digressions on Brazilian and Caribbean slavery, which had characteristics intermediate between the American and Russian extremes. The book's thematic divisions ("The Masters and Their Bondsmen" and "The Bondsmen and Their Masters") nicely frame life for those on either side of the wall of privilege. Finally, although Kolchin necessarily takes a lofty and abstract view, anecdotes and quotations enliven almost every page.

No review of "Unfree Labor" would be complete without mentioning what a fine model of historical presentation it is. Kolchin writes well, but he also appreciates how eloquent a well-crafted map or table of figures can be -- something that seems to elude far too many historians.
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