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eBook Moroland: The History of Uncle Sam and the Moros 1899-1920 epub

by Robert A. Fulton

eBook Moroland: The History of Uncle Sam and the Moros 1899-1920 epub
  • ISBN: 0979517303
  • Author: Robert A. Fulton
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Tumalo Creek Press; 2009 ed. edition (October 15, 2007)
  • Pages: 528 pages
  • ePUB size: 1480 kb
  • FB2 size 1557 kb
  • Formats lrf txt lrf doc


Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading MOROLAND: The History of Uncle . I've just started what promises to be a great book: It's titled Moroland - 1899-1906.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading MOROLAND: The History of Uncle Sam and the Moros 1899 - 1920. It's the story of the American conflict in the Philippines at the beginning of the 20th Century - as the author describes it, "America's first attempt to transform an Islamic society. This one of those stories you don't learn about in school, though the conflict was arduous and bloody - much more intense than the famous Indian Wars.

Although it riveted the American public in its day, it has become to all intents a "lost" history.

Fulton has done a first-rate job in this, the first of two volumes on this fascinating, little-known subject. This is a complete history of the American occupation of and conflict with the Moro peoples of the southern Philippines following the end of the Spanish-American War. It is highly relevant today as this was the first experience Americans had with a native Islamic insurgency, and they are making the same mistakes now they did then.

Tumalo Creek Press, 2009 - Mindanao Island (Philippines) - 524 pages. Bibliographic information. Moroland: The History of Uncle Sam and the Moros 1899-1920.

The Sultan did not want to acknowledge US sovereignty over his land but was pressured to accept it by his prime minister . Moroland: The History of Uncle Sam and the Moros 1899-1920 (2009) pp 43-58. Philippine Update: The Bates Treaty.

The Sultan did not want to acknowledge US sovereignty over his land but was pressured to accept it by his prime minister and adviser, Hadji Butu Abdul Bagui and two of his top- ranking datus, Datu Jolkanairn and Datu Kalbi. Hadji Bagui exerted all of his influence to prevent another bloody war, recognizing the folly of armed resistance against a colonizing world power. Hadji Bagui and his son, Hadji Gulamu Rasul later favored the integration of the Moros into the Philippine Republic.

The Lynching of Louie Sam. surehok. You just clipped your first slide! Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later. Now customize the name of a clipboard to store your clips.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Moroland is the lost history of the once-famed struggle between the United States Army and the "wild" Moros, the Muslim peoples of the southern Philippine islands. Start by marking MOROLAND: The History of Uncle Sam and the Moros 1899-1920 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Lasting over two decades, it was this country's first sustained encounter with a volatile mixture of nation-building, insurgency, counterinsurgency, and militant Islamism.

Find this Pin and more on moroland by Nurjain Hadjihil. MOROLAND: The History of Uncle Sam and the Moros 1899 - 1920 by Robert A. Fulton. Author: Robert A. View this Pin. The Spanish American War.

In the 1960's Robert A. Fulton was a young foreign service officer with the . Information Agency stationed in the Philippines

In the 1960's Robert A. Information Agency stationed in the Philippines. It was here he first came into close personal contact with the Moros of the islands of Mindanao and the Sulu Archipelago and witnessed first-hand the beginnings of the modern-day Moro separatist movements. He never forgot hearing many tales of the long ago battles between the Moros and the Americans.

Fulton, Robert . Moroland: The History of Uncle Sam and the Moros 1899–1920 (Bend, OR. .--, In the Wake of Terror; Class, Race, Nation, Ethnicity in the Postmodern World (Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2007a), 232pp. Moroland: The History of Uncle Sam and the Moros 1899–1920 (Bend, OR: Tumalo Creek Press, 2016 e. Text%20Document/a brief history of. --, The Philippine Temptation: Dialectics of Philippines-U.

Moroland is the lost history of the once-famed struggle between the United States Army and the "wild" Moros, the Muslim peoples of the southern Philippine islands. Lasting over two decades, it was this country's first sustained encounter with a volatile mixture of nation-building, insurgency, counterinsurgency, and militant Islamism. A byproduct of the Spanish-American War, the task of subduing and then "civilizing" the "Land of the Moros", a land area larger than Ireland, was delegated to the U.S. Army. Working through the traditional ruling hierarchy and respecting an ancient system of laws based on the Qur'an, "Moro Province" became an autonomous, military-governed Islamic colony within a much larger, overwhelmingly Christian territory. For three years it was a successful and bloodless occupation, but trouble arrived in mid-1903 when the American objective transitioned to a grand experiment: an audacious plan to transform and remake Moro society, values, and culture in an American image; placing the Moros on an uncertain and ill-defined path towards eventual integration in a Western-style democracy. The Moros reacted with obstinate and unyielding resistance to what they perceived as a deliberate attack on the religion of Islam and a way of life ordained by God. The constant stream of battles and expeditions that followed over the next ten years is known in U.S. Army history as the "Moro Campaigns". In violence and ferocity they may have equaled, if not surpassed, the more famous late-19th Century Indian Wars of the Great Plains. Despite seeming victory after victory on the battlefield, pacification of the Moros remained a distant and elusive goal. Gradually the Army was replaced as the principal instrument for achieving “law and order” over the troubled province by the famed Moro Constabulary and the Philippine Scouts; native troops led by American and European officers. In 1914, the US Army left Moroland altogether, replaced by a civil government and a major increase in the Constabulary. Despite proving far more effective than the Army, Moro resistance to what they perceived to be outside rule continued (for that matter it has not abated to this day). In 1920 the last American Governor left and control over Moroland was handed over to the Filipino-dominated colonial legislature. The backdrop is a bustling, raucous, newly-prosperous nation finding its way as a world and imperial power. But with this new-found status came a near-religious belief that the active spread of America's institutions, values, and form of government, even when achieved through coercion or force, would create a better world. A subplot is a deep and bitter rivalry between two of its most prominent players, Capt. John J. Pershing and General Leonard Wood, born only one month apart, each championing markedly opposed military philosophies. Eventually they would compete to lead one-million American "doughboys" into the cauldron of the world's first Great War. Few Americans are aware that a century later the U.S. military quietly returned to Moroland, to battle "radical Islamist terrorism"; using Army Green Berets, Navy Seals, and other elite forces. It is the smallest of the fronts of the "global war on terror" and the least-covered or critically examined. It leads the reader to an obvious question: are we avoiding or are we repeating our own past?
Comments: (7)
Olma
This is a complete history of the American occupation of and conflict with the Moro peoples of the southern Philippines following the end of the Spanish-American War. It is highly relevant today as this was the first experience Americans had with a native Islamic insurgency, and they are making the same mistakes now they did then.

The book is well researched, complete, and contains all the applicable detail. It was written as an academic work and is thoroughly annotated and footnoted. It is not particularly well written from a grammatical standpoint and could certainly have been improved with professional editing.

My copy is in Kindle format. The book was not well set up for Kindle, contains numerous formatting errors, and far too many typos. The author should have gone back after publication and corrected these errors.

But it is a useful history of this neglected conflict, and the factual details appear to have been gleaned from in-depth research of original source documents, so it's accuracy seems excellent.
Djang
An extremely insightful study with an enormous amount of detail, written from a frankly-admitted American perspective, of the U.S. colonial actions and policies towards the Moros of the southern Philippines, correcting the historical record in important respects, and not glossing over the many faults of individuals involved. This 524 page second edition bears a printing date of 30 September 2009, and has links to a website where owners of the 2007 first edition can download an upgrade, [...]. That website is evidently a work in progress, and as of today, 29 October 2009, contains few of the promised photo illustrations, and other supporting material. My main criticism is that the volume's value as a reference source is severely limited by the woefully inadequate index, almost certainly not compiled by the author himself.
Togar
One of the best history books I have read in quite awhile. This in-depth look at our combative relationship with the Moros, the role played by certain American military figures and the basic meat and potatoes of combat and uneven diplomacy is all here in what I feel is a well balanced study of a little known aspect of our early imperial reach. A good read!
HelloBoB:D
The content within this book is, in my opinion, equal to that of combining an encyclopedia, a few other books on the Moros, and of course Google search. The author's clearly first person research adds the required detail within this book to give both a cramming student and a famed historian more than just the baseline knowledge of Moroland and America's imposed influence. The thoroughness of this book offers an intriguing read that precisely breaks down all associated people, places and things, and in appropriate, unbiased detail. Give it a try.
Zodama
The book was very informative, however, whoever was responsible for the final proof reading just plain failed, and caused the book a great injustice. Words missing in sentences, words placed in the wrong place in sentences. A very hard read at times having to reconstruct sentences to make sense of what was written.
Mananara
Well documented and from an American perspective. That part of the Philippine Insurrection (Philippine-American War) that included the Moro Wars. Adds to the study of the Philippine Constabulary.
Silverbrew
A welcome book on a little-known topic. Timely.
This is an interesting book, telling us about the Moros in Mindanao, the Mestizo Catholics in Manila, and the American soldiers and colonial leaders. Good stories about Captain John Pershing, General Leonard Wood, and Big Bill Taft.
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