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eBook Miracles and Sacrilege: Robert Rossellini, the Church, and Film Censorship in Hollywood epub

by William Bruce Johnson

eBook Miracles and Sacrilege: Robert Rossellini, the Church, and Film Censorship in Hollywood epub
  • ISBN: 0802093078
  • Author: William Bruce Johnson
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division; 1st edition (January 5, 2008)
  • Pages: 448 pages
  • ePUB size: 1106 kb
  • FB2 size 1844 kb
  • Formats mbr txt docx azw


Miracles and Sacrilege is the story of the epochal conflict between censorship and freedom in film, recounted .

Miracles and Sacrilege is the story of the epochal conflict between censorship and freedom in film, recounted through an in-depth analysis of the . Supreme Court's decision striking down a government ban on Roberto Rossellini's film The Miracle (1950). Tracing the development of the Church in the United States, Johnson discusses the reasons it found The Miracle sacrilegious and how it attained the power to persuade civil authorities to ban it.

Tracing the development of the Church in the United States, Johnson discusses the reasons it foundThe Miraclesacrilegious and how it attained the power to persuade civil authorities to ban it. The Court's decision was not only a milestone in the law of church-state relations, but it paved the way for a succession of later decisions which gradually established a firm legal basis for freedom of expression in the arts. eISBN: 978-1-4426-8863-6. Subjects: Film Studies.

William Bruce Johnson. The Miracle Case: Film Censorship and the Supreme Court. Miracles and Sacrilege: Roberto Rossellini, the Church, and Film Censorship in Hollywood. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2008.

Miracles and Sacrilege book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Miracles and Sacrilege: Robert Rossellini, the Church, and Film Censorship in Hollywood as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Miracles and Sacrilege is the story of the epochal conflict between censorship and freedom in film. There is plenty of legal discussion of the 1915 Mutual Film case holding that films were not subject to First Amendment protection, the decision 37 years later that they were, and a number of cases in between. However, there is little of the back-and-forth argument over which side has the better position in a given case; the book offers much more than that. Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, 2008. Miracles and sacrilege. 9780802093073 (bound : acid-free paper), 9780802094933 (pb.

As William Bruce Johnson notes in Miracles and Sacrilege, the . Miracles and Sacrilege, too, is more history than film analysis.

As William Bruce Johnson notes in Miracles and Sacrilege, the response was Capra-esque. Somewhere between seven and eleven million people signed their names in response to the rising scandals in the tabloids (see Fatty Arbuckle’s notorious downfall) and the blatant sexuality on the screen (see Barbara Stanwyck in anything before ’34). Miracles and Sacrilege is the story of the epochal conflict between censorship and freedom in film, recounted through an in-depth analysis of the . In this extraordinary case, the Court ultimately chose to abandon its own longstanding determination that film comprised a mere 'business' unworthy of free-speech rights, declaring for the first time that the First Amendment barred government from banning any film as 'sacreligious.

Miracles and Sacrilege : Roberto Rossellini, the Church, and Film Censorship in Hollywood. by William Bruce Johnson.

Miracles and Sacrilege is the story of the epochal conflict between censorship and freedom in film, recounted through an in-depth analysis of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision striking down a government ban on Roberto Rossellini’s film The Miracle (1950). In this extraordinary case, the Court ultimately chose to abandon its own longstanding determination that film comprised a mere ‘business’ unworthy of free-speech rights, declaring for the first time that the First Amendment barred government from banning any film as ‘sacreligious.’

Using legal briefs, affidavits, and other court records, as well as letters, memoranda, and other archival materials to elucidate what was at issue in the case, William Bruce Johnson also analyzes the social, cultural, and religious elements that form the background of this complex and hard-fought controversy, focusing particularly on the fundamental role played by the Catholic Church in the history of film censorship. Tracing the development of the Church in the United States, Johnson discusses the reasons it found The Miracle sacrilegious and how it attained the power to persuade civil authorities to ban it. The Court’s decision was not only a milestone in the law of church-state relations, but it paved the way for a succession of later decisions which gradually established a firm legal basis for freedom of expression in the arts.

Comments: (2)
Gindian
This book is not a law review article. There is plenty of legal discussion of the 1915 Mutual Film case holding that films were not subject to First Amendment protection, the decision 37 years later that they were, and a number of cases in between. However, there is little of the back-and-forth argument over which side has the better position in a given case; the book offers much more than that. The author gives us plenty of background into the religious, political, and cultural milieu that existed at the time of Mutual Film and how it changed through two world wars, the Depression, and the Red Scare. Readers who question the relevance of the 19th-century experiences of Irish Catholics in America (and how it differed from the 20th-century experience of Italian immigrants) will eventually come to see how that history lead to the Church's involvement in film censorship (both public and private). That, in turn, influenced the industry's response to the social changes that accelerated after World War II. In a way, the Supreme Court's decision regarding The Miracle is unsurprising--almost an anticlimax. Given all of the threads in this story that are expertly woven together by the author, it was inevitable.
Heraly
The book is a far more comprehensive examination of the social & religious mores of U.S. culture than the title would suggest. It soars above a book about film and gives a unique and detailed view of how and why film censorship happened. Censorship is a vehicle for an informed and sophisticated tracing of the Americanization of religion over the past 150 years culminating with a pivotal Supreme Court decision about free speech.
Hard to imagine serious thought or study of the subject without guidance from this book.
And it is amusing and entertaining all the while.
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