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eBook Love in a Dead Language epub

by Lee Siegel

eBook Love in a Dead Language epub
  • ISBN: 0226756971
  • Author: Lee Siegel
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (May 15, 1999)
  • Pages: 408 pages
  • ePUB size: 1684 kb
  • FB2 size 1628 kb
  • Formats azw lit lrf doc


Lee Siegel is professor of religious studies at the University of Hawaii

Lee Siegel is professor of religious studies at the University of Hawaii. Paperback: 408 pages. Complex, irreverent, sensual, witty, outrageous! Perhaps even sexier than the Kama Sutra itself. Siegel is America’s most underrated intellectual and its least pretentious. He is an effortless polymath who has chosen to challenge, enlighten and delight his readers rather than simply impress them. One of the best Western tales since Durrell or Bowles.

It just is what it is and what it is to me is a book that breaks open barriers in writing, self, characters, authors, narrators, & events in a way that feels ultimately unspeakably enlightening. In short, I feel this wondrous, sometimes befuddling, book is a masterpiece. 8 people found this helpful.

His work stands out as a book that is not simply a novel but its own genus of rollicking, narrative scholarship. it is just the cerebral aphrodisiac we need. Immensely clever and libidinously hilarious. Insofar as any printed volume can lay claim to being a multimedia work, this book earns that distinction.

Lee Anthony Siegel (born 1945, Los Angeles, California) is a novelist and professor of religion at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Siegel studied comparative literature at the University of California, Berkeley and fine arts at Columbia University. He received his DPhil from the University of Oxford for a dissertation in the field of Sanskrit

Perhaps it's enough just for me to say I experienced the book as a journey, an interloping & interlooping series of stories that may (or may not) involve the author with the narrator(s) & the narrators appearing to come to life & enter into the (presumed) real life of the author, Lee Siegel.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on April 17, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

The hero of this protean comedy, Leopold Roth, complains, "I am a tenured full professor of Indian studies and a Sanskrit scholar, and yet never, never in my life, have I made love to an Indian woman.

Lee Siegel is professor of religious studies at the University of Hawaii

Lee Siegel is professor of religious studies at the University of Hawaii.

Written by. Lee Siegel. Manufacturer: University Of Chicago Press Release date: 1 October 2000 ISBN-10 : 0226756998 ISBN-13: 9780226756998. Loaned To Aaron (15 items) list by jdnyc.

Love in a Dead Language is a love story, a translation of an Indian sex manual, an erotic farce, and a murder mystery rolled into one. Enticing the reader to follow both victims and celebrants of romantic love on their hypertextual voyage of folly and lust-through movie posters, upside-down pages, the Kamasutra: Game of Love board game, and even a proposed CD-ROM, Love in a Dead Language exposes the complicities between the carnal and the intellectual, the erotic and the exotic and, in the end, is an outrageous operatic portrayal of romantic love. "Rare is the book that makes one stop and wonder: Is this a literary masterpiece or do I need my head examined? But such is the alternately awe-inspiring and goofy thrall cast by Lee Siegel's Love in a Dead Language. . . . His work stands out as a book that is not simply a novel but its own genus of rollicking, narrative scholarship . . . it is just the cerebral aphrodisiac we need." —Carol Lloyd, Salon"Immensely clever and libidinously hilarious. . . . [T]he most astonishing thing about Love in a Dead Language is its ingenious construction. Insofar as any printed volume can lay claim to being a multimedia work, this book earns that distinction." —Paul di Filippo, Washington Post Book World"Now along comes Lee Siegel, who mixes a bit of Borges with some Nabokov and then adds an erotic gloss from the Kama Sutra to write Love in a Dead Language, a witty, bawdy, language-rich farce of academic life. . . . Whether it is post-modern or not, Love in a Dead Language is pulled off with such unhinged élan by Mr. Siegel that it is also plain good fun, a clever, literate satire in which almost everything is both travestied and, strangely, loved by its author." —Richard Bernstein, The New York Times"Love in a Dead Language deserves space on the short, high shelf of literary wonders." —Tom LeClair, New York Times Book Review1999 New York Times Book Review Notable Book of the Year
Comments: (7)
Ballagar
One of the funniest books I've read. Very entertaining while at the same time the reader learns a lot about an arcane subject. The send-up of academe is hilarious and spot on. Respects the subject while make it amusing. Lots of sex is always fun to read! History plus sex: can't get better than that. Makes me think college history texts should be way more risque.
Kuve
Complex, irreverent, sensual, witty, outrageous! Perhaps even sexier than the Kama Sutra itself. Siegel is America’s most underrated intellectual and its least pretentious. He is an effortless polymath who has chosen to challenge, enlighten and delight his readers rather than simply impress them. One of the best Western tales since Durrell or Bowles.
Zorve
I don't mean to insult Siegel -- I liked his academic parady and did find parts of the book to be very funny. It's just that once you've read Nabokov's masterpiece, Pale Fire, you see how much better Nabokov was at that kind of parody. It almost seems that Siegel copies Nabokov a bit too closely. Parts of this book were just poorly done, but it had enough to make it worth reading if you enjoy academic spoofs. If you liked this book at all, you must read Pale Fire.
Gralinda
There have been enough summaries of this text in other reviews so I won't venture my summary here. Perhaps it's enough just for me to say I experienced the book as a journey, an interloping & interlooping series of stories that may (or may not) involve the author with the narrator(s) & the narrators appearing to come to life & enter into the (presumed) real life of the author, Lee Siegel. Just who is who in this moebius strip of self revelation? The chief narrator, Roth, is a creation of the author, Siegel, but Roth is translating the KamaSutra & in doing so has so fallen for the narrative that he is possessed by the desire to act it out, regardless of reality, his (fictional) position & truly wonderful wife. He loses touch with his (fictional) reality to create his text within a text reality of India & romantico-erotic love with his alluring but bland student. Not only is nothing real in their relationship, it soon becomes clear that Roth (who is fictional) is imposing his vision of ancient, classical & wondrous India upon the current run-down state of the Indian cities & temples. All this writing seems to wear out our author (Siegel) who seems himself to feel the text of the KamaSutra & Roth's infidelities wearing on him so he must enter the (fictional) text in person to intervene. The whole thing is a wonderful phantasmagoria, with stories within stories within stories. Is it comedy? Sure, if you like. Is it tragedy? Undoubtedly, if you read it as such. Is it love story? Well, I found it to be one, partially, sometimes. Is it erotic literature about erotic literature within erotic literature? Absolutely, whatever that means.
I agree with others who say the book is not for everyone, as some very disgruntled reviews show. But that makes it all the more special. It is for readers with acumen, some willingness to suspend expectations, to follow narratives back into themselves instead of steadily progressing to a satisfyingly expected conclusion, & to ask questions about writing, about loving, about textuality & reality that perhaps can never really be answered. *...Dead Language* could be labelled as postmodern, but the truly postmodern resists such labels. It just is what it is and what it is to me is a book that breaks open barriers in writing, self, characters, authors, narrators, & events in a way that feels ultimately unspeakably enlightening. In short, I feel this wondrous, sometimes befuddling, book is a masterpiece.
net rider
It's hard to know where to start! A spoof of sorts of Nabokov's Lolita (and a shade of Pale Fire- Nabokov, if you pardon the pun), a spoof of the Kamasutra, a spoof of boring pretentious academics...it's a topsy-turvy world and you even wonder at first if you bought a defective copy because of the typesetting. It takes you from scene to scene with a movie-like quality. I laughed so hard at times I woke my neighbours! The dinner party scene is hilarious and the funeral scene equally hilarious. Actually, it was all hilarious and amazingly clever. If you haven't read Lolita by Nabokov, read it first. It is equally amazing and you will appreciate the tribute to Nabokov in this fabulous novel!
Read Pale Fire. Have a look at the Kamasutra. This book is aimed at a certain demographic: sophisticated readers who have attended university/college and have some knowledge of Nabokov, academia and Indian culture/Kamasutra. But even without those prerequisites, you will still enjoy it and it might draw you to Nabokov. I laughed so hard I heard my neighbours flush their loo in the middle of the night.
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