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eBook The Exile Mission: The Polish Political Diaspora and Polish Americans, 1939–1956 (Polish and Polish American Studies) epub

by Anna D. Jaroszynska-Kirchmann

eBook The Exile Mission: The Polish Political Diaspora and Polish Americans, 1939–1956 (Polish and Polish American Studies) epub
  • ISBN: 0821415271
  • Author: Anna D. Jaroszynska-Kirchmann
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ohio University Press; 1 edition (August 15, 2009)
  • Pages: 384 pages
  • ePUB size: 1471 kb
  • FB2 size 1311 kb
  • Formats lit lrf mobi mbr


At midcentury, two distinct Polish immigrant groups-those Polish Americans who were descendants of economic immigrants from the turn of the twentieth century and the Polish political refugees who chose exile after World War I. .

At midcentury, two distinct Polish immigrant groups-those Polish Americans who were descendants of economic immigrants from the turn of the twentieth century and the Polish political refugees who chose exile after World War II and the communist takeover in Poland-faced an uneasy challenge to reconcile their concepts of responsibility toward the homeland. The new arrivals did not consider themselves simply as immigrants.

The Exile Mission by Professor Anna Jaroszyńka-Kirchmann is an extremely well written and meticulously annotated history of the Polish Diaspora between 1939-1956. It was during this particular time period that my family emigrated to the . and, as a result, this book had a special significance for me. It is the first time that I understood what was going on in Germany with the Polish political refugees and the history of where I was born, and why there.

At midcentury, two distinct Polish immigrant groups-those Polish Americans who were descendants of.Anna D. Jaroszyńska-Kirchmann.

At midcentury, two distinct Polish immigrant groups-those Polish Americans who were descendants of economic immigrants from the turn of the twentieth century a. Series: Polish and Polish-American Studies Series. The two largest Polish national uprisings-the 1830 November Uprising and the 1863 January Uprising-failed under the overwhelming military might of the partitioning powers. But no oppressors could defeat the spirit of the Polish people, whose national anthem proclaimed, Poland is not overcome yet, as long as we are still alive.

At midcentury, two distinct Polish immigrant groups-those Polish Americans who were descendants of economic . Between the outbreak of World War II and 1956, as Professor Jaroszyńska–Kirchmann demonstrates, the exile mission in its most intense form remained at the core of relationships between these two groups.

Request PDF On Jun 1, 2009, Robert Szymczak and others published The Exile Mission: The Polish Political . The Chaldeans: Politics and Identity in Iraq and the American Diaspora.

The Chaldeans: Politics and Identity in Iraq and the American Diaspora.

Ohio University Press Polish and Polish-American Studies Series. Athens: Ohio University Press, 2004. Recommend this journal.

The Exile Mission : The Polish Political Diaspora and Polish-Americans, 1939-1956. Considering the two distinct Polish immigrant groups after World War II - the Polish-American descendants of pre-war ecomomic migrants and polish refugees fleeing communism - this study explores the uneasy challenge to reconcile concepts of responsibility toward their homeland.

2004: Anna n, The Exile Mission: The Polish Political Diaspora and Polish Americans, 1939-1956. 2002: Joseph Bigott, From Cottage to Bungalow: Houses and the Working Class in Metropolitan Chicago,1869-1929 and Stephen Leahy, Clement Zablocki, Milwaukee's Most Politician: A Study of Local Politics and Congressional Foreign Policy.

Considering the two distinct Polish immigrant groups after World War II - the Polish-American descendants of pre-war ecomomic . Additional Product Features. Place of Publication. Polish and Polish-American Studies.

Considering the two distinct Polish immigrant groups after World War II - the Polish-American descendants of pre-war ecomomic migrants and polish refugees fleeing communism - this study explores the uneasy challenge to reconcile concepts of responsibility toward their homeland.

At midcentury, two distinct Polish immigrant groups—those Polish Americans who were descendants of economic immigrants from the turn of the twentieth century and the Polish political refugees who chose exile after World War II and the communist takeover in Poland—faced an uneasy challenge to reconcile their concepts of responsibility toward the homeland.The new arrivals did not consider themselves simply as immigrants, but rather as members of the special category of political refugees. They defined their identity within the framework of the exile mission, an unwritten set of beliefs, goals, and responsibilities, placing patriotic work for Poland at the center of Polish immigrant duties.In The Exile Mission, an intriguing look at the interplay between the established Polish community and the refugee community, Anna Jaroszynska–Kirchmann presents a tale of Polish Americans and Polish refugees who, like postwar Polish exile communities all over the world, worked out their own ways to implement the mission's main goals. Between the outbreak of World War II and 1956, as Professor Jaroszynska–Kirchmann demonstrates, the exile mission in its most intense form remained at the core of relationships between these two groups.The Exile Mission is a compelling analysis of the vigorous debate about ethnic identity and immigrant responsibility toward the homeland. It is the first full–length examination of the construction and impact of the exile mission on the interactions between political refugees and established ethnic communities.
Comments: (2)
Hiylchis
This a very thorough and detailed account of successive waves of Polish immigration to the USA from 1939. As well as a scholarly mastery of its subject, it does explore the broad themes relating this subject to the history of Poland, of Polish-American society and immigration in general
Ienekan
There is no such thing as the Polish "immigration" to America. There were Polish immigrationS. The immigration which laid the groundwork for the Polish-American community as it exists today was the great emigration of 1880-1920, people who came for economic reasons. Polish poverty and American labor needs dovetailed. The immigration from 1945-52, the "DP" (Displaced Person) immigration, was a political immigration of people who refused to return to a "Poland" that was a mere Soviet satellite. These immigrants were often well-educated professionals who felt a moral obligation to preserve the free Polish intellectual tradition (after Hitler and Stalin did their best to exterminate it). Invoking the models of a "exile mission" found in the writings of Mickiewicz and other post-1830 Uprising emigres, the "DPs" eventually came to America, added fresh blood to the Polish Diaspora in America, and kept alive faith in Poland's eventual resurrection as a truly free and democratic state. Fills an important gap. Highly recommended.
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