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eBook The Principles of History and Other Writings in Philosophy of History epub

by W. H. Dray,W. J. van der Dussen,R. G. Collingwood

eBook The Principles of History and Other Writings in Philosophy of History epub
  • ISBN: 0198237030
  • Author: W. H. Dray,W. J. van der Dussen,R. G. Collingwood
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (May 18, 1999)
  • Pages: 293 pages
  • ePUB size: 1497 kb
  • FB2 size 1260 kb
  • Formats rtf azw txt mbr


The Principles of History helps to fill the gaps. Given the depth and significance of Collingwood’s thought, this book provides us with even deeper insights into his unique and compelling ways of thinking about history

The Principles of History helps to fill the gaps. Given the depth and significance of Collingwood’s thought, this book provides us with even deeper insights into his unique and compelling ways of thinking about history. I hope to explore the topic of history and knowledge in depth in a project that I’ve dubbed history as a way of knowing (or perhaps history as the way of knowing), which will trace the ideas of Collingwood, Owen Barfield, and John Lukacs and show how their thoughts can inform our thinking. In the meantime, if you’ve any interest in how we think about history and how we judge.

This volume will be a landmark publication not just in Collingwood studies but in philosophy of history generally. The Times Literary Supplement listed IH among the one hundred most influential books since the Second World War (6 Oct. 1995, 39). For Collingwood's contributions to philosophy of mind, art, nature, religion, poli tics, and philosophy itself, see . PA, IN, RP, NL, EPM, EM.

The original text of this work was only recently discovered. It is accompanied by shorter unpublished writings by Collingwood on historical knowledge and inquiry.

of History by R. G. Collingwood, W. H. Dray, W. J. van der Dussen .

This is the summary of The Principles of History: And Other Writings in Philosophy of History by R. Woodturning - The Plasma Ball - Продолжительность: 7:39 Matt Jordan Recommended for you.

Collingwood was not just a philosopher of history but also a practising historian and archaeologist. The Principles of History and Other Writings in Philosophy of History (ed. William H. Dray and W. van der Dussen) (2001). He was, during his time, a leading authority on Roman Britain: he spent his term time at Oxford teaching philosophy but devoted his long vacations to archaeology. He began work along Hadrian's Wall. The Philosophy of Enchantment: Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology (2005).

Principles of History book. This volume will be a landmark publication not just in Collingwood studies but in philosophy of history generally.

55. R. Collingwood, The New Leviathan or Man, Society, Civilization and Barbarism (Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1992).

Items related to The Principles of History: And Other .

Items related to The Principles of History: And Other Writings in Philosophy. Collingwood, R. The Principles of History: And Other Writings in Philosophy of History. ISBN 13: 9780199243150. This book also includes two conclusions written by Collingwood, which were eventually revised and published as The Idea of Nature. W. Dray is Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Ottawa; he has held visiting appointments at Toronto, Harvard, Stanford, and Duke Universities, among others.

work on philosophy of history by the great Oxford philosopher and historian R. Collingwood (1889-1943)

Published here for the first time is much of a final and long-anticipated work on philosophy of history by the great Oxford philosopher and historian R. Collingwood (1889-1943). The original text of this uncompleted work has only recently been discovered.

Published here for the first time is much of a final and long-anticipated work on the philosophy of history by the great Oxford philosopher and historian R. G. Collingwood (1889-1943). The original text of this uncompleted work has only recently been discovered and is accompanied here by shorter writings by Collingwood on historical knowledge and inquiry. Besides containing entirely new ideas, these incredible writings discuss many of the issues which Collingwood famously raised in The Idea of History and in his Autobiography. This book also includes two conclusions written by Collingwood, which were eventually revised and published as The Idea of Nature. Moreover, this book contains a lengthy editorial introduction that puts Collingwood's writings in their context and discusses the philosophical questions they initiate. A landmark publication, this work will appeal not only to those studying Collingwood but also to anyone broadly curious about philosophy of history.
Comments: (2)
Nidor
Sometimes awe and modesty compel us to brevity where otherwise we’d feel need to blather on at length. This will be a short post, not because the subject doesn’t merit a lengthier treatment. To the contrary, it merits so much more. So I hope that this post is just in the way of a trailer or preview of what I hope in time to consider at more length.

R.G. Collingwood is a late arrival on my radar. In fact, he was probably a part of my undergraduate syllabus in my Philosophy of History course, but he didn’t stick. Now, I’m learning about him, as he keeps popping up, as it were. Last year in India, I bought a copy of The Idea of History, his masterwork, which The Times Literary Supplement selected as one of the most influential books published since the Second World War. But I haven’t read that book yet. So why this book, less famous and published much later?

First, it’s on Kindle, which means that it is accessible to me know (unlike my copies--yes, copies--of The Idea of History now in storage). But perhaps an even better reason—or excuse—for reading this first book comes from the history of the writings themselves.

By the late 1930s, Collingwood, then in his early forties, knew that his health was failing. He went on a writing and publication flurry. He’d lectured at Oxford on various occasions in the 1930s about his philosophy of history and historiography. In 1939, during a long cruise intended to bolster his health, he began writing The Principles of History, a companion of sorts to his book The Principles of Art. However, because of his failing health, the advent of WWII, and two other writing projects he wanted to complete, he set the project aside. Death took him in early 1943, with his work about history unpublished in book form. After his death, literary executor, T.M. Knox, brought together several of Collingwood’s writings, including lecture notes, and published them through Oxford University Press as The Idea of History. And as I mentioned, it proved quite a success (at least according the standards of its peer group.) Knox left out some papers, but the source was considered exhausted. Except it wasn’t.

In 1995, archivists at Oxford University Press discovered the (uncompleted) manuscript of The Principles of History that Collingwood has written during his 1939 cruise to Indonesia. They also discovered some papers on other topics as well. The new materials didn’t reveal any startling new positions or arguments made by Collingwood, but they helped to complete his positions and to reveal his overall plan. He'd intended to publish two volumes on the subject of history. The Idea of History covered much of this area, but not all of it, nor in the manner that Collingwood had intended. The Principles of History helps to fill the gaps. Given the depth and significance of Collingwood’s thought, this book provides us with even deeper insights into his unique and compelling ways of thinking about history.

I hope to explore the topic of history and knowledge in depth in a project that I’ve dubbed “history as a way of knowing” (or perhaps history as the way of knowing), which will trace the ideas of Collingwood, Owen Barfield, and John Lukacs and show how their thoughts can inform our thinking. In the meantime, if you’ve any interest in how we think about history and how we judge its fruits, you must read this book.
Jieylau
This is the book, or a fragment of the book, that R. G. Collingwood was preparing to write his entire life. It is, in this edition, very incomplete. I have rated it as four stars only because there is too much matter from the editor, and not enough of Collingwood. This book, read in conjunction with his series on Philosophy and History, particularly the "Essay on Metaphysics", "The Idea of History", and "An Essay on Philosophical Method", will give the reader a very complete idea of Collingwood's philosophy. The book, as Collingwood conceived it, but did not live to complete, was to be an expanded version of his earlier "Speculum Mentis" (1924), which was his only complete treatise covering the entire range of philosophy.
"Speculum Mentis" is in fact one of the most remarkable books written in the last century, and Collingwood must be rated among the great philosophical thinkers of all time. Like all the great philosophers he has been misunderstood, most of all by philosophers, who, rather than read the text read their own interpetations into it, and then try to classify and pigeonhole the writer based on this. His writing style is beautiful. He is nearly as easy to read as C. S. Lewis, whom he knew, and more so than his close friend and colleague at Oxford, the Celtic philologist, J. R. R. Tolkein.
The best book covering these three and their teachers at Oxford is James Patrick, "The Magdalen Metaphysicals: Idealism & Orthodoxy at Oxford, 1901-1945" (Mercer University Press, 1895), which is available through Amazon.com. This interesting book should lead you to a new understanding of these men and the similar philosophy that informs the work of each.
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