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eBook The One-State Solution: A Breakthrough for Peace in the Israeli-Palestinian Deadlock epub

by Virginia Tilley

eBook The One-State Solution: A Breakthrough for Peace in the Israeli-Palestinian Deadlock epub
  • ISBN: 0472115138
  • Author: Virginia Tilley
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Humanities
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Michigan Press; Fourth Printing edition (May 24, 2005)
  • Pages: 288 pages
  • ePUB size: 1359 kb
  • FB2 size 1199 kb
  • Formats txt lrf lrf doc


The One-State Solution explains how Israeli settlements have encroached on the occupied territory of the West Bank and Gaza Strip to such an extent that any Palestinian state in those areas is unworkable.

The One-State Solution explains how Israeli settlements have encroached on the occupied territory of the West Bank and Gaza Strip to such an extent that any Palestinian state in those areas is unworkable. And it reveals the irreversible impact of Israel's settlement grid by summarizing its physical, demographic, financial, and political dimensions

The One-State Solution demonstrates that Israeli settlements have already encroached on the occupied territory of the West Bank and Gaza Strip to the extent that any Palestinian state in those areas is unviable.

The One-State Solution demonstrates that Israeli settlements have already encroached on the occupied territory of the West Bank and Gaza Strip to the extent that any Palestinian state in those areas is unviable. It reveals the irreversible impact of Israel’s settlement grid by summarizing its physical, demographic, financial, and political dimensions.

The One-State Solution demonstrates that Israeli settlements have . Finally, the book addresses the daunting obstacles to a one-state solution-including major revision of the Zionist dream but also Palestinian and other regional resistance-and offers some ideas about how those obstacles might be addressed.

Article excerpt (It is telling that even in the subtitle of this book, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is. .Virginia Tilley is blessed with such courage and complements it with the requisite academic erudition.

ARAB-ISRAELI CONFLICT The One-State Solution: A Breakthrough for Peace in the Israeli-Palestinian Deadlock, by Virginia Tilley. Ann Arbor, MI: The University of Michigan Press, 2005. It is telling that even in the subtitle of this book, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is replaced by the Israeli-Palestinian deadlock. Those supporting the one-state solution are perceived as radicals, undomesticated, Jew-haters, and automatically "on the side" of the Palestinians in that conflict.

Mobile version (beta). The One-State Solution: A Breakthrough for Peace in the Israeli-Palestinian Deadlock. Download (pdf, . 6 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

The One-State Solution : A Breakthrough for Peace in the Israeli-Palestinian Deadlock. If "The One-State Solution" helps propel forward a debate that has hardly begun in this country it will have performed a signal scholarly and political function

The One-State Solution : A Breakthrough for Peace in the Israeli-Palestinian Deadlock. If "The One-State Solution" helps propel forward a debate that has hardly begun in this country it will have performed a signal scholarly and political function. --Tony Judt, New York University. A]s such it will take pride of place in a brewing debate.

The one-state solution : a breakthrough for peace in the Israeli-Palestinian deadlock, Virginia Tilley. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. 1. Arab-Israeli conflict-Peace. Israeli withdrawal and a viable Palestinian state were still imaginable. By the end of the 1990s, however, the settlements were major urban complexes burrowed deep into Palestinian territory.

The one-state solution: A breakthrough for peace in the Israeli-Palestinian deadlock. The one-state solution. University of Michigan Press, 2005. Ethnic and Racial studies 20 (3), 497-522, 1997. Seeing Indians: A study of race, nation, and power in El Salvador. Israel and South Africa: The many faces of apartheid. R Kasrils, DO Ben-Dor, J Cook, L Farsakh, A Löwstedt, A Badran,.

In her first book on the topic, The One-State Solution (2005 . University of Michigan Press. ISBN 978-0-472-11513-6.

In her first book on the topic, The One-State Solution (2005, University of Michigan Press), she argued that Israel's settlements in the West Bank have made a two-state solution obsolete. Tilley has also specialized in the global comparative politics of settler colonialism and indigenous peoples.

The Palestinian-Israeli conflict is an existential one in which the real issue has been the mutual denial of the other’s right to exist. From the late nineteenth century Jews and Palestinians have battled over each other’s legitimacy more than anything else

The Palestinian-Israeli conflict is an existential one in which the real issue has been the mutual denial of the other’s right to exist. From the late nineteenth century Jews and Palestinians have battled over each other’s legitimacy more than anything else. The Balfour Declaration of 1917 and – legally more significant – the League of Nations Mandate (approved in 1922, ratified in 1923) gave the Jews an important advantage in that the Palestinians were marginalised as ‘the existing non-Jewish communities,’ questioning their status as a nation or a people.

“A clear, trenchant book on a topic of enormous importance... Overall this is a courageous plungeinto boiling waters. If it helps propel forward a debate that has hardly begun in this country it willhave performed a signal scholarly and political function.”—Tony Judt, New York University“. . . a pioneering text. . . . [A]s such it will take pride of place in a brewing debate.”—Gary Sussman, Tel Aviv UniversityThe One-State Solution demonstrates that Israeli settlements have already encroached on the occupied territory of the West Bank and Gaza Strip to the extent that any Palestinian state in those areas is unviable. It reveals the irreversible impact of Israel’s settlement grid by summarizing its physical, demographic, financial, and political dimensions. Virginia Tilley explains why we should assume that this grid will not be withdrawn—or its expansion reversed—by reviewing therole of the key political actors: the Israeli government, the United States, the Arab states, and the European Union. Finally, the book addresses the daunting obstacles to a one-state solution—including major revision of the Zionist dream but also Palestinian and other regional resistance—and offers some ideas about how those obstacles might be addressed. Virginia Tilley is Chief Research Specialist in the Democracy and Governance Division of the Human Research Council in Cape Town, South Africa.
Comments: (7)
Mave
Required reading for Americans befuddled by US support for the Apartheid State of Israel.
Innadril
At one point Tilley admits that feasibility is a key issue- but declines to discuss it. Could this be because feasibility is the Achilles heel which will undoubtedly kill her proposal?
She also claims that no one can expect Palestinians to meld into the country of Jordan (even though it is 60% Palestinian, almost entirely Muslim, and has not vowed to destroy Israel), yet asserts that Palestinians can meld into Israel (even though it is almost entirely Jewish and Hamas vows to destroy all Zionists).
She criticizes Israeli ethnic suppression of Palestinians, but ignores Palestinian ethnic suppression of Jews.
She insists that Palestinians are not anti-semetic, but ignores the fact that Arabs officially sided with Nazis in WW2.
She condemns Jewish ethno-racist voting in democracy but naively assumes Arabs would not do the same, even though votes for Muslim Brotherhood and Hamas in Gaza shows they would.
She notes that it is safe for people of all religions to visit the Temple Mount in Jerusalem (access to which is controlled by Israel) but neglects to mention that it is unsafe for Christians and Jews to visit Abraham's tomb in Hebron (which is controlled by Palestinians).
She seems oblivious to the fact that an Arab majority of voters and judges could extinguish "equal rights" in a "one-state."
She posits a long tradition (unproven) of Palestinian democracy, but admits it never worked for 20 years under Palestinian leaders Arafat and Abbas.
She advocates dismantling Israeli's "Basic Law," even though it produces peaceful elections and transfer of power in contrast from internal Palestinian political and armed conflict.
She repeatedly attacks Israel but hardly ever criticizes Palestinian attitudes and actions, as though Israel is the enemy of peace while Palestinians are blameless.
She states that Israel is no better than Sadam Hussein or Sudan, but does not state that she would rather live in Iraq or Sudan than in Israel.
The One-State Solution is a book of shattered pieces which dismisses or ignores the volume of facts that kill her thesis.
Onath
If Israel is not for them, who will be for them? The answer is noone sadly. This is an accurate historical perspective on Israel and I suggest that everyone give themselves a real education and stop listening to dumb lamestream journalists who are too lazy to even read something other than someone else's opinion or blog and regurgitate it. Fascinating, honest, and relevant in a world of total goons who don't know anything about this conflict yet jump on a bandwagon.
Ieregr
As many Palestinian and even some Israeli scholars have already known for years (since Oslo), thw two state solution is no longer a reasonable option for a viable Palestinian state. The Israeli government with its illegal wall that cuts into West Bank, settlement blocks, and access roads have made it impossible for any state to emerge from the occupied territories. Based on what is known now, any new Palestinian state that would arise would be essentially within Israel.

Virginia Tilley's book shows the problems with the two state solution and shows an alternative argued by both sides of the conflict: the one state solution. She also presents the obvious political implications to this proposal (dismantling of the Zionist regime in Israel, etc).

This book is an excellent work to include amongst the vast scholarly literature on the conflict as well as its possible rational solution based on the facts on the ground today.

In an age of global multi-ethnic communities, one ethnic state is an obsolete concept and no longer applies to Israel (20% of their population is Arab). One multi ethnic and religious Palestine is the more realistic solution
Kazracage
Virginia Tilley offers a refreshing and, I suspect for most, a fairly novel perspective on viewing the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, as well as offering some very substantive solutions to a seemingly insoluble dilemma. At times, she does paint the situation with some overly broad strokes, but her analysis is generally thorough and well documented. Her historical analysis tends to exaggerate Jewish/Israeli "complicity" in aggravating the conflict, and tends to overly downplay the role and impact of extremist elements in the Arab/Palestinian camp, which after all, led to early Palestinian Arab rejection of the very solution, based on the "bi-national" model, which she now offers. She does very correctly depict the conflict as more of a "civil war", rather than a general Arab vs. Jewish dispute; while at the same time she does allude to the very significant peripheral role that these larger communities play in fueling the conflict.

Overall, her proposal for a "one-state" solution, though somewhat simplistic in that it fails to depict the depth and intensity of opposing passions on both sides of the fence, is both reasonable and sound, and as she consistently points out, it's ultimately the ONLY solution. Much to her credit, she does recognize the role that passions, both rational and irrational play in this conflict, but fails to penetrate the role that historical circumstances play in generating and fueling them. Like almost all academics, she reflexively draws the parallel with South Africa, but in reality, the social situation in the "Jewish" state is more akin to the pre-civil rights era in this country, since the highly institutionalized structure of "apartheid" that existed in South Africa is far from present in Israel, though certain similarities in the apartheid mindset clearly inspire some Israeli laws.

In conclusion, I would applaud Virginia on her creativity and boldness in addressing this most volatile of issues from a refreshing perspective; after all, the "one-state" solution is what I've been advocating for over 30 years, long before it started to become trendy. However, I've always advocated the "one-state" to be establish under Israeli, not Palestinian, auspices, as you don't dismantle an existing, and certainly a very viable, apparatus to recreate one of dubious legitimacy. Obviously, Arab Palestinian would be given the opportunity for citizenship in this "new" Israel, and that citizenship would grant absolute equality for all; however, as Virginia well states, there would still be a role for cultural/ethnic (though not necessarily geographic) autonomy in this restructured state, along with essential guarantees that the nature of the state could never be changed without the majority consent of all concerned; i.e., both Jews and Arabs. While anathema to most Israeli Jews, and Jews worldwide, this does, in fact, represent the very solution that many Jews had previously embraced during the British Mandate period; albeit vehemently rejected by the Mufti of Jerusalem and apparently the bulk of the most vocal representatives of the Palestinian Arab community.

A must read for anyone involved in resolving this never-ending debacle; and one I believe is destined to set the bar on future publications regarding this conflict.
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