» » Landmark: The Inside Story of America's New Health-Care Law and What It Means For Us All (Thorndike Press Large Print Nonfiction Series)

eBook Landmark: The Inside Story of America's New Health-Care Law and What It Means For Us All (Thorndike Press Large Print Nonfiction Series) epub

by The Staff of The Washington Post

eBook Landmark: The Inside Story of America's New Health-Care Law and What It Means For Us All (Thorndike Press Large Print Nonfiction Series) epub
  • ISBN: 1410428990
  • Author: The Staff of The Washington Post
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Medicine & Health Sciences
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Thorndike Press; Large Print edition (May 19, 2010)
  • Pages: 449 pages
  • ePUB size: 1912 kb
  • FB2 size 1761 kb
  • Formats rtf lrf mobi lit


Our health care costs are nearly twice as much as everyone else. It gives the reader a behind-the-scenes look at what it took to make PPACA happen.

Our health care costs are nearly twice as much as everyone else. Among OECD countries, we have by far the largest portion of our population uninsured. Every year, 700,000 Americans file for bankruptcy because of medical bills. Among our major trading partners those respective figures are zero and zero. Also, health care costs are growing far faster than the economy.

In this indispensable book, the staff of the Washington Post tells the story of health-care reform and explains what it means for the American people. In the book’s first section, the Washington Post’s reporter embedded in the White House provides a behind-the-scenes narrative of how Obama and the Democrats pushed through health-care reform in the face of nearly unanimous Republican opposition.

In this indispensable book, the staff of the Washington Post tells the story of health-care reform . In the book's first section, the Washington Post's reporter embedded in the White House provides a behind-the-scenes narrative of how Obama and the Democrats pushed through health-care reform in the face of nearly unanimous Republican opposition. In the third section, Washington Post writers answer the most pressing questions about the health-care legislation's immediate impact.

In the evolution of norms for health, Part 2 examines the intertwined history of US development of a right to health in international law and implementation through national health care reforms. Culminating in the promulgation of the 2010 Affordable Care Act, Part 3 analyses how this national policy effort corresponds with the principles of the international right to health – even as it neglects any explicit recognition of the right to health. With the Affordable Care Act immediately challenged as a violation of the US Constitution, Part 4 looks to the first major challenges to the Affordable.

This summary offers a concise overview of the entire book in less than 30 minutes reading time. However this work does not replace in any case The Staff of the Washington Post book.

The Washington Post 's must-read guide to the health care overhaul What now? Despite the rancorous, divisive, year-long debate in Washington, many Americans still don't understand what the historic overhaul of the health care system will-or won't-mean.

Staff of the Washington Post. The book is in new condition and will, in most cases, have a small dot or line on the edge of the book

Staff of the Washington Post. In Landmark, the national reporting staff of The Washington Post pierces through the confusion, examining the new law’s likely impact on us all: our families, doctors, hospitals, health care providers, insurers, and other parts of a health care system that has grown to occupy one-sixth of the . The book is in new condition and will, in most cases, have a small dot or line on the edge of the book. It may also have a price sticker on it from the original store it was returned from. In a rare case the actual cover for a book might not match the one in the display picture.

For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

The Washington Post’s must-read guide to the health care overhaul

The Washington Post’s must-read guide to the health care overhaul. What now? Despite the rancorous, divisive, year-long debate in Washington, many Americans still don’t understand what the historic overhaul of the health care system will-or won’t-mean.

The abortion fight : what the compromise means. The rest of the story : mental health, dental, and more.

The call of history : "we're gonna get this done". The House of Pelosi : deals and betrayals. The power of one : Lieberman blocks the way. The rescue : Obama's last chance. Priority one : expanding coverage. The individual mandate : how it will work. The insurers : more customers, more restrictions. The abortion fight : what the compromise means.

Landmark The Inside Story of America's New Health Care Law and What It Means for Us All The Staff of The Washington PostReporters and editors from the national staff of The Washington Post provide a comprehensible summary of the health care legislation the president signed into law in Spring 2010, and examine the impacts it will have on Americans in various categories, on health care providers and insurers, and on the health care system as a whole. They also provide a fascinating behing-the-scenes narrative of how the legislation came together, and of the political obstacles, events, negotiations, and compromises that helped determine its shape
Comments: (7)
FEISKO
I thought the book was an great summary of the legislation, and I thought it was excellent that it included the full text of the bill. There is clearly some bias in the writing, but nothing substantial or that effects the summary of the law.
Mr.Twister
This book was very helpful during the time it took for the Affordable Care Act bill to pass. It is still an excellent source of reference. After reading it, I've decided that the bill can be improved upon and I hope that Congress will work to get it right.
Zavevidi
college class required. good price
Akinozuru
Obama signed this Act into law in March 2010. Nearly a year later with politicians so polarized, it seems like a miracle that he ever did. Republicans did not want any part of health care reform. Meanwhile, Democrats often viewed a public-option as a must.

The first part of the book does a good job reporting the history of this legislative miracle. It culminated soon after Scott Brown won the Massachusetts Senatorial seat and broke the Democrats filibuster proof majority. Thereafter, the Democrats pulled the nuclear option with the House approving the Senate bill, and then working out details in a separate budget reconciliation bill.

The preface to the next section clearly outlines the U.S. health care problems. Our former system was broken. Our health care costs are nearly twice as much as everyone else. Among OECD countries, we have by far the largest portion of our population uninsured. Every year, 700,000 Americans file for bankruptcy because of medical bills. And, over 22,000 die because of inadequate access to health care. Among our major trading partners those respective figures are zero and zero. Also, health care costs are growing far faster than the economy. Thus, they have risen from 5.4% of GDP in 1960 to 16.2% in 2007. This trend is not sustainable. While spending so much, our health care outcomes are bad relative to other countries as shown by preventable deaths per 100,000 and infant deaths per 1,000 live births (pg. 67).

The authors clarify complex issues with helpful visual aids. The timeline table (pg. 70) readily illustrates the complex phase-in of this legislation over the 2010-2014 period. The four tiers of coverage ranging from 60% of medical cost (bronze) to 90% (platinum) are well outlined (pg. 78). The complex structure of insurance subsidies for lower income is clearly spelled out (pg. 80). The table showing how insurance coverage will be expanded to nearly the entire population is insightful (pg. 86). The visual aids showing how the Medicare Part D doughnut hole will progressively be reduced through 2020 is informative (pg. 116). The table showing what are the main costs and revenue sources of the Act over the next decade is excellent (pg. 173). Both expenses and revenues total around $1 trillion. Half of the expenses consist of subsidies for lower income individuals to buy insurance on the exchanges. The other half consists mainly in the expansion of Medicaid. Half the revenue sources come from cuts to Medicare, Medicaid, and other Government programs. And, the other half comes from taxes on individuals and fees on health industry companies.

Certain key concepts are well fleshed out. 'Why a mandate matters' (pg. 87) is well explained. If insurers can't insure near the entire population, there is no way they can offer reasonable premiums, cover all health risks, and remain solvent. This is because of negative selection whereby only the sick get insurance and the healthy do not. This is like insuring only the houses already on fire. It does not work. The sections referring to the law's effort in improving the quality and efficiency of care are really interesting. It covers concepts unknown to the general public such as the "accountable-care organizations" networks (the current Kaiser Permanente and Mayo Clinic model) that will have salaried doctors and will closely track the efficiency and quality of health care services delivery. Later, a section addresses the conundrum of better preventive care access that results in higher utilization and higher medical costs according to a CBO study. However, this Act also takes numerous measures to attempt "bending the curve" of health care costs. Those include comparative effectiveness studies and the mentioned accountable-care organizations. Beginning in 2014, it indicates that employers will have the right to sensitize the premiums paid by their employees based on wellness standards. A healthy employee's premium could be as much as 50% less as the one of an unhealthy one (smoking, overweight, high cholesterol, etc...). That's going to be interesting.

The section on the new taxes is informative. The rich will bear new taxes such as the higher medicare payroll tax of 2.35% (vs 1.45%) and the special 3.8% investment income tax on income greater than $200,000 (for singles).

The conclusion is also insightfull. It suggests that we won't know for a long time how much will the Act eventually improve our nearly bankrupt and costly health care system; This is because Republicans in Congress are opposed to the Act's implementation. Similarly, many Republican Governors vigorously oppose the Act's implementation. This political opposition could prove crucial to the Act's (lack of) success. The Republicans' obstructions could play out in numerous ways including weakening the Act ensuing legislation and the funding necessary to implement the Act effectively. As a result, if the Act does truly fail it will be difficult to assess how much was it due to a failure of policy vs politics. Another related challenge is the disparity between the proposed bare-bone plans (Bronze) vs the gold-plated ones (Gold & Platinum). The young and healthy will select the Bronze one; meanwhile, the older will take the Gold one and above. The healthy being so minimally insured, their low premiums may be inadequate to subsidize the richer policies of older citizens. Will see...
Olelifan
Great product fast shipping!!!
Tansino
This is a fascinating read. It gives the reader a behind-the-scenes look at what it took to make PPACA happen. It also shows the duplicity and back-stabbing involved in the democratic approach to making law.
September
Excellent book, needed for college, great information.
A good read for anyone wanting an overview of the new health care laws.
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