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eBook Governing Health in Contemporary China (China Policy Series) epub

by Yanzhong Huang

eBook Governing Health in Contemporary China (China Policy Series) epub
  • ISBN: 0415498457
  • Author: Yanzhong Huang
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Medicine & Health Sciences
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (November 16, 2012)
  • Pages: 192 pages
  • ePUB size: 1537 kb
  • FB2 size 1386 kb
  • Formats doc lit mbr lrf


Yanzhong Huang's book reflects a deep knowledge of Western theories as well as of Chinese political processes.

Yanzhong Huang's book reflects a deep knowledge of Western theories as well as of Chinese political processes. Ezra F. Vogel, Harvard University, USA and author of Deng Xiaoping and the Transformation of China. Yanzhong Huang has written an important book

This book examines the political and policy dynamics of health governance in post-Mao China

This book examines the political and policy dynamics of health governance in post-Mao China. It explores the nal roots of the public health and health care challenges and the evolution of the leaders’ policy response in contemporary China. Yanzhong Huang is an Associate Professor at the John C. Whitehead School of Diplomacy and International Relations, Seton Hall University, and a Senior Fellow for Global Health at the Council on Foreign Relations.

from Global Health Program. Governing Health in Contemporary China. Book by Yanzhong Huang, Author. Foreign policy analyses written by CFR fellows and published by the trade presses, academic presses, or the Council on Foreign Relations Press. Publisher – Routledge Press. Release Date – Nov 2012.

Mit der Google Play Bücher App kannst du "Governing Health in Contemporary China" auf deinem PC sowie deinen . This book examines the political and policy dynamics of health governance in post-Mao China.

Mit der Google Play Bücher App kannst du "Governing Health in Contemporary China" auf deinem PC sowie deinen Android- und iOS-Geräten lesen. Du kannst dir beim Lesen Notizen machen, interessante Stellen markieren, Lesezeichen verwenden und dir das E-Book herunterladen, um es offline zu lesen.

series China Policy Series Books related to Governing Health in Contemporary China.

series China Policy Series. The study of China’s health governance will further our understanding of the evolving political system in China and the complexities of China’s rise. As the world economy and international security are increasingly vulnerable to major disease outbreaks in China, it also sheds critical light on China’s role in global health governance. Books related to Governing Health in Contemporary China.

Recommend this journal. Journal of Social Policy.

Yanzhong Huang has written an important book. With the rise of China and its impact on the world, interest in China has increased drastically in recent years. Yanzhong Huang’s book is a welcome addition to the growing number of scholarly studies on the consequences and impact of post-Mao reforms – in this case, on developments in China’s health care secto. uang’s book offers a critical evaluation of the factors contributing to the crises in the delivery of health care and the government’s attempts to deal with.

Автор: Huang Название: Governing Health in Contemporary China Издательство: Taylor&Francis Классификация . This book examines the political and policy dynamics of health governance in post-Mao China

This book examines the political and policy dynamics of health governance in post-Mao China.

This book examines the political and policy dynamics of health governance in post-Mao China. It explores the nal roots of the public health and health care challenges and the evolution of the leaders' policy response in contemporary China. It argues that reform-induced institutional dynamics, when interacting with Maoist health policy structure in an authoritarian setting, have not only contributed to the rising health challenges in contemporary China, but also shaped the patterns and outcomes of China's health system transition.

The "One-China policy" is a policy asserting that there is only one sovereign state under the name China, as opposed to the idea that there are two states, the People's Republic of China (PRC) and the Republic of China (ROC), whose of. .

The "One-China policy" is a policy asserting that there is only one sovereign state under the name China, as opposed to the idea that there are two states, the People's Republic of China (PRC) and the Republic of China (ROC), whose official names incorporate "China". Many states follow a one China policy, but the meanings are not the same. The PRC exclusively uses the term "One China Principle" in its official communications.

The lack of significant improvement in people’s health status and other mounting health challenges in China raise a puzzling question about the country’s internal transition: why did the reform-induced dynamics produce an economic miracle, but fail to reproduce the success Mao had achieved in the health sector? This book examines the political and policy dynamics of health governance in post-Mao China. It explores the political-institutional roots of the public health and health care challenges and the evolution of the leaders’ policy response in contemporary China. It argues that reform-induced institutional dynamics, when interacting with Maoist health policy structure in an authoritarian setting, have not only contributed to the rising health challenges in contemporary China, but also shaped the patterns and outcomes of China’s health system transition. The study of China’s health governance will further our understanding of the evolving political system in China and the complexities of China’s rise. As the world economy and international security are increasingly vulnerable to major disease outbreaks in China, it also sheds critical light on China’s role in global health governance.

Comments: (2)
Umrdana
An excellent account of China's health care challenges by an expert in the field.
Doriel
State engagement in health government governance is a relatively recent development in rapidly modernizing China - the government's first health-care moves post-Mao were to withdraw from the sector, acerbating problems of cost, access, and equality; average life expectancy rose by only five years between 1981 and 2009, compared to an increase of almost 33 years during the Mao era (1949-1980). To be fair, its initial improvements (35 to 67.9) came from a much lower base, yet other nations have improved more from a similar base in recent years.

Infant/maternal mortality has made considerable strides recently. Infant mortality in China decreased from 38 deaths/1,000 live births in 1990 to 16 in 2010, and the mortality rate for children under five dropped from 48 per 1,000 live births to 18. The maternal mortality ratio has also fallen, from 110 per 100,000 live births in 1990 to 38 in 2008.

Another substantial improvement - TB cases in 2010 China were estimated at 216 per 100,000, down 45% from 2000.

Chronic non-communicable diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular are the leading causes of death in China - with pollution contributing to at least the cancer death rates. Public opinion surveys in 2009 ranked health care and food and drug safety as among the nation's top three concerns. A major contributor was the introduction of market-oriented reform w/o adequate rule of law.

Industrial pollution is not the only instance of conflict between economic and health goals. China has one-third of the world's smokers and suffers about one million related deaths/year; its cardiovascular disease death exceeds that in the U.S.

Author Huang suggests separating public hospital ownership from management and ceasing the use of drug sales as the main revenue source for hospitals, similar to Taiwan. (Of every $100 spent on U.S. health care, $10-$12 goes for drugs, in China it is $40-$45.) He also suggests replacing fee-for-service with DRG and capitation to give those hospitals incentive to hold down costs and improve accountability. As for food and drug safety, Huang sees weak enforcement as the greatest problem, sometimes based on 'political consideration' (corruption), especially at the local level. This problem is acerbated by the absence of press freedom.

The 'good news' is the incoming president Xi Jinping has pledge to bring higher levels of health care to China's people - Beijing plans to triple its health care spending to $1 trillion by 2020.

Bottom-Line: China spent less than 5% of GDP on health care in 2005, vs. 16% in the U.S. and 10% in Canada. However, China's advantage in purchasing power parity leads author Huang and others to probably overstate the crisis in China's health-care as far as financial commitment is concerned; this is especially likely given that the author's estimates of government spending have been labeled as far too low (Tang, Baris). It also has initiated a program of encouraging Western hospitals to invest in China. A third major initiative - expanding health insurance to universal levels by 2020 (now reportedly at over 94%, though at low benefit levels that focus on in-patient care).
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