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eBook Nanotechnology: Molecular Speculations on Global Abundance epub

by BC Crandall

eBook Nanotechnology: Molecular Speculations on Global Abundance epub
  • ISBN: 0262531372
  • Author: BC Crandall
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Science & Mathematics
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: MIT Press (August 1, 1996)
  • Pages: 226 pages
  • ePUB size: 1789 kb
  • FB2 size 1665 kb
  • Formats mobi docx lrf mbr


Crandall presents ten essays out of which to construct your nanoUtopian dream. Another example of a genre called fictional science where the reader must supply the plot, characters and action.

Crandall presents ten essays out of which to construct your nanoUtopian dream. What is all this talk of nanobots and utility fog? Is man not already constructed from nanomachines? One might already ask if molecules of nicotine, aspirin, heroin or cocaine are nanomachines since they control the flow of neurotransmitters

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Crandall, B. C. Publication date.

Technology is becoming molecularly precise. Technology is becoming molecularly precise. Nanotechnology, otherwise known as molecular engineering, will soon create effective machines as small as DNA. This capacity to manipulate matter - to program matter - with atomic precision will utterly change the economic, ecological, and cultural fabric of our lives.

PAO systems were described in BC Crandall's Nanotechnology: Molecular Speculations on Global Abundance in. .

PAO systems were described in BC Crandall's Nanotechnology: Molecular Speculations on Global Abundance in the Brian Wowk article "Phased-Array Optics. Potential social impacts. Nine original essays on specific applications follow the introductory chapter.

The introductory chapter on molecular engineering, written by Crandall . This book provides an excellent introduction to nanotechnology.

The introductory chapter on molecular engineering, written by Crandall, covers an impressive range of ideas and facts and introduces some novel perspectives. He begins by explaining measurement systems and physical scales, and then introduces atoms and molecules, giving both scientific basics and historical perspective, and segueing into the most relevant facts from biochemistry and molecular biology.

Molecular Speculations on Global Abundance. Contributors Robert Birge.

Nanotechnology, otherwise known as molecular engineering, will soon create effective machines as small as DNA. This capacity to manipulate matter-to program matter-with atomic precision will utterly change the economic, ecological, and cultural fabric of our lives.

Crandall BC (ed) (1999) Nanotechnology: molecular speculations on global abundance. MIT Press, Cambridge, MAGoogle Scholar. Daintith J (2008) Nanotechnology. In: A dictionary of chemistry, 6th edn. Oxford University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar. Daintith J (2009) Nanotechnology. In: A dictionary of physics, 6th edn.

Technology is becoming molecularly precise. Nanotechnology, otherwise known as molecular engineering, will soon create effective machines as small as DNA. This capacity to manipulate matter―to program matter―with atomic precision will utterly change the economic, ecological, and cultural fabric of our lives. This book, which is accessible to a broad audience while providing references to the technical literature, presents a wide range of potential applications of this new material technology.

The first chapter introduces the basic concepts of molecular engineering and demonstrates that several mutually reinforcing trends in current research are leading directly into a world of surprisingly powerful molecular machines. Nine original essays on specific applications follow the introductory chapter. The first section presents applications of nanotechnology that interact directly with the molecular systems of the human body. The second presents applications that function, for the most part, outside the body. The final section details the mechanisms of a universal human-machine interface and the operation of an extremely high resolution display system.

Comments: (2)
Bliss
Crandall presents ten essays out of which to construct your nanoUtopian dream. Another example of a genre called fictional science where the reader must supply the plot, characters and action. What is all this talk of nanobots and utility fog? Is man not already constructed from nanomachines? One might already ask if molecules of nicotine, aspirin, heroin or cocaine are nanomachines since they control the flow of neurotransmitters. Is molecular engineering merely the search for molecular shapes that will fit together like lego blocks-just like the search for new drugs?
Many are enamored by the way the cells and bacteria of the body construct our reality. They would like to copy these processes and rename them nanotechnology. Viewing cells and proteins as nanomachines is not new. Evolution, itself, could be viewed as a way of encapsulating cooperating cells into human shaped terrariums. Crandall quotes Richard Preston on the flesh eating Ebola Zaire virus: "seven mysterious proteins that ...work as a relentless machine, a molecular shark, and they consume the body as the virus makes copies of itself."
These writers suggest ways man could profit by controlling the design of these cellular machines. Richard Crawford's contribution suggests man designed molecules could be injected into the blood steam in order to do the bidding of cosmetic surgeons. He sees big cash to be made. Edward Reifman proposes diamond teeth but would this put dentists in the unemployment line? Brian Wowk manipulates phase array optics to enable the reader to construct a STAR TREK holodeck. J. Storrs Hall envisions filling one's environment with utility fog, placing one within a kind of pixel coated TV screen where objects in your personal space can be moved as easily as pictures on that screen. Tom McKendree worries that nanosized assemblers will make goods so plentiful that nothing will be of any value. Crandall, himself, suggests that when room runs out on earth we might repackage man into geodesic spheres, floating ecospheres, in stationary orbit high above the planet. All pretty good fictional science but why not read Greg Bear where you also get the plot, characters and action.
Questanthr
Most nanotechnolgy books and articles start out with lots of hype to excite the reader, and then follow it up with a meandering discussion of how this might really be possible. This book was no exception. It did a good job of building up themes and exploring them in detail. The treatment of "utility fog" was extremely well done, as was the discussion of a "holodeck" type image technology.
The language and style is easily accessible to those with a basic science education, and it was refreshing that this book avoided the doomsday predictions of nanotechnology and kept the unbounded prediction for when this will all happen to a minimum.
Published in 1996, the content of this book is a good introduction, but is in danger of becoming dated due to the fast moving nature of this field. This might be the first nanotechnology book to read, but not the last for a true fan of the topic. This book might not be for you, if you've been able to read Nanosystems by K. Eric Drexler, but if you want an entertaining walk through visions of future technology, check this one out.
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