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eBook In the Belly of the River: Tribal Conflicts over Development in the Narmada Valley (Studies in Social Ecology and Environmental History) epub

by Amita Baviskar

eBook In the Belly of the River: Tribal Conflicts over Development in the Narmada Valley (Studies in Social Ecology and Environmental History) epub
  • ISBN: 0195671368
  • Author: Amita Baviskar
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Science & Mathematics
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 2 edition (March 17, 2005)
  • Pages: 324 pages
  • ePUB size: 1541 kb
  • FB2 size 1368 kb
  • Formats doc txt lrf azw


Cite this publication.

Baviskar explains how the adivasi identity is strengthened by the unity of their village communities and have an egalitarian approach to ownership and use of forest resources.

Includes bibliographical references (p. -283) and index. 1. Introduction - 2. National Development, Poverty and the Environment - 3. A History of Adivasi-State Relations - 4. Bhilalas: Caste or Tribe? -. - 5. Community and the Politics of Honour - 6. Economy and Ecology - 7. 'In the Belly of the River': Nature and Ideology - 8. The Politics of the Sangath - 9. The Politics of the Andolan - 10. Conclusions - Appendix 1: Trees in the Forest around Anjanvara and their Uses - Appendix 2: Gayana - The Bhilala Song of Creation - A Glossary of Hindi and Bhilali Words

the River : Tribal Conflicts over Development in the Narmada Valley

In the Belly of the River : Tribal Conflicts over Development in the Narmada Valley. This book will not only tell someone about the Narmada River project and its impacts, but it will also give one a real life insight to the isssue of relation of native population of an area and the "development" imposed upon them for the benefit of the rulers of the land.

Sobre el autor (2004). Amita Baviskar is at Ciriacy Wantrup Fellow Institute for International Studies University of California, Berkeley. Información bibliográfica. In the Belly of the River: Tribal Conflicts Over Development in the Narmada Valley Oxford India paperbacks Studies in social ecology and environmental history.

Environmentalism as a green ideology and social movement is a. .Eco-feminism Ecology Environmentalism of the poor India Social justice. In the belly of the river: Tribal conflict over development in the Narmada valley. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

Environmentalism as a green ideology and social movement is a comprehensive subject, which can only be studied in an interdisciplinary manner  . For this chapter article, I owe much to Ramachandra Guha, Joan Martinez-Alier, Sumi Krishna, Mahesh Rangarajan and other scholars who have done so much profound work on Indian environmentalism. Chapple, C. K. (2000).

In the Belly of the River. Are you sure you want to remove In the Belly of the River from your list?

In the Belly of the River. In the Belly of the River. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove In the Belly of the River from your list? In the Belly of the River. Tribal Conflicts over Development in the Narmada Valley (Studies in Social Ecology and Environmental History). Published May 23, 1996 by Oxford University Press, USA.

Amita Baviskar was born on 9th May 1965. Amita Baviskar is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the Institute of Economic Growth, Delhi

Amita Baviskar was born on 9th May 1965. Amita Baviskar is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the Institute of Economic Growth, Delhi. Professor Amita Baviskar received her Bachelor of Arts in Economics in 1986 and Master of Arts degrees in Sociology in 1988 from the University of Delhi. She then received her P. in Development Sociology from Cornell University in 1992. Her first book In the Belly of the River: Tribal Conflicts over Development in the Narmada Valley discussed the struggle for survival by adivasis in central India against a large dam.

Studies in Social Ecology and Environmental History. In the Belly of the River

Studies in Social Ecology and Environmental History. Tribal Conflicts over Development in the Narmada Valley. Studies in Social Ecology and Environmental History.

This book provides an account of the lives of Bhilala adivasis in the Narmada valley who are fighting against displacement by the Sardar Sarovar dam in Western India. On the basis of intensive fieldwork and historical research, this study places the tribal community in the context of its experience of state domination. The author challenges current theories of social movements which claim that a cultural critique of the "development" paradigm is writ large in the political actions of those marginalized by "development"--adivasis who lived in harmony with nature, combining reverence for nature with the sustainable management of resources. The complexity of adivasi politics cannont be reduced to an opposition between "development" and "resistance." The book forces us to re-examine the politics of representation within the ideology of progressive movements. It will be of equal interest to scholars and social activists concerned about development environment, and indigenous peoples.
Comments: (3)
Manesenci
This book will not only tell someone about the Narmada River project and its impacts, but it will also give one a real life insight to the isssue of relation of native population of an area and the "development" imposed upon them for the benefit of the rulers of the land. It is a picture of such a side of civilization that does not vary from continent to to continent, country to country, and people to people. The scholarly yet far from impersonal and lively writing of Amita Baviskar makes the book even more alive along with it's intrinsic topical depth. This not just the story of a people, it is the history of the river and the people, differentiating between who is often to difficult to try.

When writer Arundhati Roy was asked about the Narmada project, "Why are you against development?" She replied, "Whose Development?" To know the answer, this book is the best one available to us.
Longitude Temporary
I'm primarily writing this review in response to the review given above, I have a different view point on this book and I wanted to share it. I have to admit, having lived in a big city all my life, I'm really ignorant about life in villages or about tribals. I have also been vaguely aware of the struggle over the Narmada project and other environmental movements in India. I have just started thinking consciously about these issues after I came to the US. This is the first book that I read from cover to cover, on anything involving sociology/environemnt/ development/tribals/indian non-fiction! I thought Amita Baviskar has presented a very interesting analysis on how the tribals percieve their own struggle, and the apparent difference in how it is portrayed by the intelligentsia. I do not think she is against the NBA or what they're trying to achieve. It is an objective analysis, in my humble opinion, and I strongly believe that in order to find a solution/middle-ground on this issue all parties concerned have to consider all possible angles, be objective and not get carried away by rhetoric. And in trying to be objective, I do not think that Amita Baviskar, becomes any less passionate/concerened an activist, than say Medha Patkar. I reccomend this book to anyone who is interested in hearing a more objective view, you may not agree with it, but I think it's worth listening too.
X-MEN
This book starts with the author's personal experiences, teaching her native subjects how to read and write. She also argues that the scholarly research should inspire action. Introduction swiftly starts with an excellent alteration between Baviskar's participant observation and theorization. I was impressed by her lucid narration which turns poetic at times and sure enough she did work on tribal poetry in one of her other books. I also liked her "ethical dilemma" of critical intellectual enquiry v/s her relationships with local people, something that every researcher faces when one goes to one's own community for research.

But soon chapter 2 onwards, the book turns into an open propaganda for Marxist ideology. She equates India's poverty with industrialization and urbanization by Nehruvian policies. However, someone like Gurcharan Das would disagree with her and argue that Indian poverty has persisted due to the heavy state control precisely due to Nehruvian policies which stifled the growth and innovation by Indian people. She criticizes heavy centralized industries promoted by Indian state but ignores the fact that they were modeled after communist model of USSR and China, not "influenced by capitalists" as she argues on page 30. Again, on page 35, she lists former colonizing countries Germany, England and France as the models for industrialization of India, ignoring the influence of USSR. In fact, private capitalists were seen as villains in the heavy state control days of Nehru and Indira Gandhi. Only after Manmohan Singh liberalized Indian economy in late nineties did capitalism made some inroads into Indian state. Does Marxism inspire communism of USSR or Gandhian economics? Talk of having my cake and eating it too!

On page 26, she argues that technology will only benefit richer societies. That may be true for 1995 when she wrote the book. Today, one can easily see cell phones and televisions suffusing all parts of the Indian society. "Trickle down" effect is obvious at least for some technological tools.

Kerala and West Bengal, frequently cited by Marxist scholars as model states with great education, health care, controlled population growth, etc. However, these great achievements cannot be juxtaposed to mean that they have also achieved poverty alleviation. One can argue that poverty alleviation in the richer states such as Maharashtra, Gujarat and Punjab did not directly lead to population control (page 26 footnote). Similarly, Marxist states with great human development do not necessarily mean economic development as well.

On page 30, she enthusiastically reiterates CSE report that environmental degradation is only felt by rural poorer societies whereas urban society is indifferent and unaffected by it. However, late CSE expert Anil Agarwal had admitted that this was completely wrong conclusion by CSE in 1982 when the report was published by them. The fact is both urban and rural people are equally affected by environmental degradation. Urban water, air and land is as polluted or may be more polluted than rural. Survival in Indian cities is as ecologically harmful as survival in Indian villages. Sadly, she overlooks this.

In the conclusion of second chapter, she labels local initiatives as advanced by Gandhi as Marxist approach in contrast to Nehruvian way. Ironically, religious ecological initiative will also argue for such a Gandhian approach. Is it fair to label it either Marxist or religious or just call it local initiative? May be this is an ideal way to merge religious ecological initiative with Marxist one! And yes this merger takes place on page 43. On page 38, juxtaposes Marx's view with ecology. Why bring in a non-native ideology onto native tribes! Why can't native religious ideas be utilized for ecological awareness? Why promote constructive theology of Marxism as the final and only solution for all the world's problems! She argues that Ghayana myth is not translated into ecological actions/practice. Just as red (Marxism) has turned into green (Environmentalism), why can't the native tribes be inspired to transform/reinterpret their religious myths into green version but that would undermine these leftist intellectuals!

First the Marxist revolution argued for economic growth for the disadvantaged people which led to huge five year plans and industrialization. Now, are they asking for a u-turn? Native folks have long suffered due to the intellectuals' romance with non-native ideologies! She criticizes Shiva and others that they are not rooted in the true lives of Adivasis. Aren't Marxist intellectuals also foreign to natives? Why this "holier than thou" attitude? First chapter appears as totally disjoint with the rest of the book. There is no theoretical connection of the introduction with the rest of the book.
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