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eBook War and Change in World Politics epub

by Gilpin

eBook War and Change in World Politics epub
  • ISBN: 0521273765
  • Author: Gilpin
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; Reprint edition (November 25, 1983)
  • Pages: 288 pages
  • ePUB size: 1108 kb
  • FB2 size 1286 kb
  • Formats doc lrf txt docx


World Politics, Vol. 35, Issue.

World Politics, Vol. 04, p. 489. CrossRef. War and Change in World Politics. Online ISBN: 9780511664267. Gilpin has read widely and thoughtfully, and future analysis of big changes in the world political system will find that he has asked important questions and given provisional answers. Source: Political Science Quarterly.

Start by marking War and Change in World Politics as Want to Read .

Start by marking War and Change in World Politics as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The basic takeaway, at least to myself, would seem to be that no matter how invincible a hegemon might seem in its time of glory (ie the US in the decades immediately after WWII), nature will take its course, the hegemon's global responsibilities will exceed what it can afford to expend, its citizens will lose their martial spirit, Gilpin proposes.

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War and Change in World Politics. The book is rich in the use of history and the breadth of its analysis and it breaks some new ground. It is, also, an academic study written for academics; the general reader, though he may need to absorb its lessons, will find it rather hard going.

The discussion focuses on the differential growth of power in the international system and the result of this unevenness. War and Change in World Politics introduces the reader to an important new theory of international political change.

Chapter 1. Robert Gilpin’s aim is a description of change in international relations. Its objectives are to control its territory, influence other states and control the world economy in pursuit of its interests. To do this he proposes conceptions of the state, its role and objectives, and the nature of the international system. The state is characterized as the protector of its citizens and their property. The international system consists of a number of diverse entities, states being the principal type, in a condition of regular interaction under a form of control.

The result, maintains Gilpin, is that actors seek to alter the system through territorial, political, or economic expansion until the marginal costs of continuing change . Books related to War and Change in World Politics.

The result, maintains Gilpin, is that actors seek to alter the system through territorial, political, or economic expansion until the marginal costs of continuing change are greater than the marginal benefits. When states develop the power to change the system according to their interests they will strive to do so- either by increasing economic efficiency and maximizing mutual gain, or by redistributing wealth and power in their own favour.

Gilpin, War and Change in World Politics. State will attempt to change the international system if expected benefits exceed expected costs. Prestige is a function of power. Law of diminishing returns as hegemonic power.

War and Change in World Politics introduces the reader to an important new theory of international political change. Arguing that the fundamental nature of international relations has not changed over the millennia, Professor Gilpin uses history, sociology, and economic theory to identify the forces causing change in the world order. The discussion focuses on the differential growth of power in the international system and the result of this unevenness. A shift in the balance of power - economic or military - weakens the foundations of the existing system, because those gaining power see the increasing benefits and the decreasing cost of changing the system. The result, maintains Gilpin, is that actors seek to alter the system through territorial, political, or economic expansion until the marginal costs of continuing change are greater than the marginal benefits. When states develop the power to change the system according to their interests they will strive to do so- either by increasing economic efficiency and maximizing mutual gain, or by redistributing wealth and power in their own favour.
Comments: (7)
AnnyMars
Robert Gilpin's work is the best-known and most influential within the Hegemonic Realist paradigm. Hegemonic Realism is a school of thought which views International Relations as organized hierarchically, with each state vying for the top position in order to gain the benefits of being the number one state. In Gilpins' words "Throughout history a principal objective of states has been the conquest of territory in order to advance economic, security, and other interests". War occurs when a rising state challenges the current hegemon, and seeks to overtake the priviliged postion. On the other hand, when one state is firmly in control, they institute a stable economic system which tends to keep the peace. There are serious problems with Hegemonic Realist theory, however, as well as Gilpin's own version of it. The first is the deductive logic behind the theory. Surely Gilpin is correct when he asserts that states have always sought conquest and territorial expansion. However, he is wrong about the motive. States seek security above all. Economic interests are not a main motive. Wars generally cost more than they could possibly gain in monetary terms. Major wars are especially costly, and no state would seek a major war with huge losses in order to gain a top position. Rather, states start wars to protect themselves from potential destruction. There are also major empirical problems with this theory, in that there really hasn't been a case of a rising power starting a war with the current hegemon. Part of this is due to the fact that Hegemonic theory only looks at the two strongest states, factoring out all the other Great Powers. But in a Multipolar system, the other states matter as well. Hegemonic Realism, for all its flaws, has made one major contribution to scholarship: The concept of state power as changing rather than fixed, as well as the concept of future expectations of power trends. This concept has been incorporated by Dale Copeland in "The Origins of Major War." Other than that however, Gilpin and his colleagues have little to offer.
Vozilkree
I had to read this book for class. The sections on the decline of empire/hegemony are essential to understanding why the United States is doomed to fail. The author explains that the cost of maintaining empire eventually bankrupt the empire and a new hegemony replaces the old one. Although this can be done peacefully (collapse of USSR), the historical norm is total war between the hegemony/empire and the new challengers.

The chances of U.S. citizens electing somebody like Ron Paul who will drastically scale back overseas forces and end preemtive wars is not good. More likely than not status quo politicians like Bush, Obama, Romney, etc will get elected and continue to maintain America's 900 military bases in 130 countries; start new wars and expand old ones; spend vast sums of money on expensive military research and projects. According to Gilpin's chapter on empire decline, this means that the U.S. will eventually bankrupt itself and there will be a change in the international system. Hopefully the change will be peaceful (U.S. voluntarily bringing forces home as Ron Paul advocates), and not violent (U.S. goes to war with China, Russia or another rising power that threatens U.S. hegemony).
Felolv
Gilpin is surprisingly easy to read and interpret, this book is a great size to carry around for school. Great seller and very great shipping!
Jum
I am reading the book for school. I am just not interested in the material.
Whitestone
nice product
HeonIc
Book was in good condition and it came quickly. It is boring but political science readings usually are.
grand star
This classic book from the early 1980's was written by Robert Gilpin from the Realist school of international relations. Seeing nation states as actors trying to maximize their own power, the realist school looked at nation states as the rough equivalent of rational actors in a theoretical economic paradigm.

At a theoretical level, this book is helpful for understanding inter-relationships between nation states and how changes which disrupt the balance of power between nation-states can create the potential for conflict and outright war. Written during the cold war, when nation-states were the primary actors in world affairs, it doesn't address the non-state actors and their role in international affairs and how they complicate what interests a nation-state seeks to maximize.

Gilpin puts a great deal of emphasis on the role nation-states play in gaining and maintaining hegemony over other nation-states. Gilpin provides the classical balance of power analysis of the cold-war years and codifies the paradigm in a well ordered fashion.

There has been alot of water under the bridge in foreign relations since Gilpin produced this monumental book. Despite it's limitations, much of his analysis is useful today.
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