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eBook Fuzzy Math: The Essential Guide to the Bush Tax Plan epub

by Paul Krugman

eBook Fuzzy Math: The Essential Guide to the Bush Tax Plan epub
  • ISBN: 0393339467
  • Author: Paul Krugman
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company (May 1, 2010)
  • Pages: 128 pages
  • ePUB size: 1717 kb
  • FB2 size 1198 kb
  • Formats lrf mbr rtf lit


Paul Krugman is the recipient of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Economics. In a slim volume (I read it in two sittings with no problem) Krugman very clearly spells out how the Bush campaign and administration hoodwinked the public into thinking his tax cut was for the middle class

Paul Krugman is the recipient of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Economics. He is a best-selling author, columnist, and blogger for the New York Times, and is a professor of economics and international affairs at Princeton University. In a slim volume (I read it in two sittings with no problem) Krugman very clearly spells out how the Bush campaign and administration hoodwinked the public into thinking his tax cut was for the middle class. The fact is that 45% of the tax cut goes to the wealthiest 1% of families.

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With Fuzzy Math, Paul Krugman dissects the Bush tax proposal and shows us who wins, who loses, and how quickly the tax cuts will consume the surplus. Always the equal-opportunity critic when it comes to faulty economics, Krugman also tucks into the Democratic With huge budget surpluses just ahead, the question of whether to cut taxes has shifted to when? and by how much?

The Essential Guide to the Bush Tax Plan. Paul Krugman is the recipient of the 2008 Nobel Prize in Economics. A prolific author, columnist, and blogger, he teaches economics and international affairs at Princeton University. Krugman on the Financial Crisis.

The Essential Guide to the Bush Tax Plan. In Fuzzy Math, Paul Krugman dissects the Bush tax proposal and shows us who wins, who loses, and how quickly the tax cuts will consume the surplus. Always the equal-opportunity critic when it comes to faulty economics, Krugman also tucks into the Democratic alternatives to the Bush plan.

With Fuzzy Math, Paul Krugman dissects the Bush tax proposal and shows us who wins, who loses, and how quickly . This little book packs a big wallop

With Fuzzy Math, Paul Krugman dissects the Bush tax proposal and shows us who wins, who loses, and how quickly the tax cuts will consume the surplus. This little book packs a big wallop. It may very well change the course of history. Fuzzy Math: The Essential Guide to the Bush Tax Plan.

In "Fuzzy Math," Paul Krugman debunks the deceptive hype deployed on behalf of the tax cut of 2001. But "Fuzzy Math" literally changed my mind in one night

In "Fuzzy Math," Paul Krugman debunks the deceptive hype deployed on behalf of the tax cut of 2001. Krugman points out how so extravagant a tax cut will force serious reductions in services - most likely, to social security. Four years later, pundits and analysts told Americans of the dire threat to social security - a threat those same pundits and analysts dismissed when defending the cuts. But "Fuzzy Math" literally changed my mind in one night.

Paul Krugman wrote about fuzzy math in his book, Fuzzy Math: The Essential Guide To. .

Paul Krugman wrote about fuzzy math in his book, Fuzzy Math: The Essential Guide To The Bush Tax Plan published in 2001, and the phrase has appeared in a number of newspaper headlines over the past decade. The article was entitled, Fuzzy Math Used To Help Make Case and the first sentence read

Wielding his widely recognized powers of explanation, Paul Krugman lays bare the hidden facts behind the $2 trillion tax cut.

With huge budget surpluses just ahead, the question of whether to cut taxes has shifted to when? and by how much? With Fuzzy Math, Paul Krugman dissects the Bush tax proposal and shows us who wins, who loses, and how quickly the tax cuts will consume the surplus. Always the equal-opportunity critic when it comes to faulty economics, Krugman also tucks into the Democratic alternatives to the Bush plan. This little book packs a big wallop. Together with major media appearances, it puts Krugman's wisdom and steely-eyed analysis firmly at the center of the debate about how to spend upwards of $2 trillion. It may very well change the course of history.
Comments: (7)
Fohuginn
So, we had tax cuts because we had a surplus, tax cuts because we had a recession, tax cuts to pay for two wars, tax cuts to pay for medicare part D, tax cuts to help poor people, tax cuts to help the middle class, tax cuts to create jobs, tax cuts because we had a housing bubble, stock market crash and a great recession. And what do we have to show for it?

Why Krugman! Why hasn't the economy improved with tax cuts? Where is paradise with all these tax cuts? Oh, the rich got richer, the wealth trickled or flowed up to the 1% AKA 400 people run this country and decide your future and mine everyday. We went from the land of opportunity to the land of inequality and the most difficult country in the third or fourth world to move up from lower class to middle or middle to wealthy etc.

Well, I guess tax cuts are like prescribing sugar pills for every kind of illness a person can get.

Allen W. Smith PHD had a good book out at this time that was spot on the numbers too. VOODOO ECONOMICS are just that.
White gold
Almost as many people voted for Bush as voted for Gore -- and Bush ran on his tax-cut plan. In a slim volume (I read it in two sittings with no problem) Krugman very clearly spells out how the Bush campaign and administration hoodwinked the public into thinking his tax cut was for the middle class.
The fact is that 45% of the tax cut goes to the wealthiest 1% of families. Even "working stiffs" earning $400,000 per year get it bad. The truth is revealed in the Treasury departments own released numbers (see Table 7 on page 111) which are cleverly packaged in such a way that they SEEM to say the exact opposite. But Paul Krugman is not fooled, and he explains why you should not be either.
Favorite line: (on last page) "But there's a special reason to oppose the Bush plan, quite aside from its actual merits or lack thereof. This is the utter dishonesty of the sales campaign. At every stage of the debate Bush and his people have tried to obscure what they were really proposing."
For your own good, you must read this book.
virus
Whether you find yourself rooting for George Bush's ten-year tax cut plan or against it, Paul Krugman's concise, well documented, and straightforward "Fuzzy Math" will add depth to your argument. If the countless divergent articles, statistical tables, and TV pundit's gibbering commentary, on the subject of George Bush's flagship campaign issue, have failed to satisfy your desire to understand it, you owe it to yourself to listen to Princeton's Proffesor Krugman demystify the issue.
What taxes it affects, where the money is coming from, and to whom it is going, are just some of the answers that this brisk and short narrative provides. A must read for anyone interested in the nuts and bolts of "the ten-year tax cut" debate.
mym Ђудęm ęгσ НuK
"Fuzzy Math" (2001) was designed to be 1) a short primer on American taxes, fiscal policy and monetary policy and 2) a discussion of Bush's proposed tax plan. Krugman suggests that monetary policy (by the Fed) is preferred in most cases to improve the economic condition. If tax cuts or increases are to be used, the changes should be short in duration. Because the proposed Bush tax cuts increase slowly and last for ten years, this type of proposal is not good to give the 2000 sluggish economy a boost. Also the ten year tax cut proposal is not good because the small annual surplus should be kept to build up the treasury in case of war, emergencies, and the onset of the retirement of baby boomers.

Krugman documents that 45% is the amount of the multi-trillion dollar tax cuts that goes to the top 1% of the society. Krugman documents how this incredible disparity is cloaked by the Treasury department's analysis. The Treasury table never breaks out the tax relief for the top 1%. They only list the average tax relief for the top 5%, which decreases the appearance of the incredible tax relief inequality. Krugman ends the book with "I can't think of any previous administration that has tried to sell its economic plans on such false pretenses. It would be a shame, and a dangerous precedent, if they get away with it." Not enough people read this book, so unfortunately they did get away with their dishonesty. And now in 2012, they are trying to sell their plan once again, which they know will increase the inequality of our society even more to make it worse than that the Gilded Age.

Read this book and be prepared for the propaganda in 2012-2013 that will be used to provide more tax breaks for the 1%. Because so much of the tax breaks went to the 1% in the last ten years, now the Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid programs are being blamed for the deficit instead of the 1% who gobbled up all the breaks from 2001 to 2012. Just review Romney's 2010 and 2011 tax returns to see how the 1% use the tax breaks especially enacted for their entertainment.
SupperDom
I recommend this book to anyone, even though the tax cuts Paul Krugman argues against have already come. Krugman, who is a New York Time od-ed writer and also a policy professor at Princeton, presents clear reasons why the Bush tax cuts are not a good idea.
Conservatives will find the book biased, which it is since Krugman is pretty democratic. Although conservatives might be able to argue the political philosophy of progressive versus regressive taxes, they will find it very difficult to challenge the numbers that Krugman presents. The end conclusion is that Bush has used "fuzzy math" to propose a tax cut and that the money is just not there for such a huge cut. Krugman is right.
Even though the cuts have already come, this book is a great (and quick) read because it gives a clear explanation of social security, medicare, and other issues related to the national budget. Clear, concise, and easy to understand.
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