» » Discontents: Postmodern and Postcommunist

eBook Discontents: Postmodern and Postcommunist epub

by Paul Hollander

eBook Discontents: Postmodern and Postcommunist epub
  • ISBN: 076580090X
  • Author: Paul Hollander
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Transaction Publishers; 1 edition (January 21, 2002)
  • Pages: 430 pages
  • ePUB size: 1242 kb
  • FB2 size 1407 kb
  • Formats azw mobi txt lrf


Paul Hollander is professor emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and center associate at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University.

Temporarily out of stock. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Paul Hollander is professor emeritus at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and center associate at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard University. His books include Political Pilgrims, The Many Faces of Socialism, and Soviet and American Society: A Comparison.

Paul Hollander wrestles with these and other questions in seeking to understand conditions and developments within American culture and society in the context of their relationship to political systems, movements and ideas.

Paul Hollander wrestles with these and other questions in seeking to understand conditions and developments within American culture and society in the context of their relationship to political systems, movements and ideas critical of the United States and Western values. Discussion of these discontents in the United States in the last decade of the twentieth century leads to an obvious question: How much and what kind of discontents are possible in a society that has experienced over a decade of economic growth, close to full employment, hardly any inflation, falling crime rates, declining teenage pregnancies, and other good things?

This contribution investigates the role and the evolution of the lyric in the postmodern type of fiction that appeared from 1975 onwards in the Netherlands and (a few years later) in Flanders. Three stages are discerned lesser extent, Gerrit Krol.

Postmodern and Postcommunist. Paul Hollander wrestles with these and other questions in seeking to understand conditions and developments within American culture and society in the context of their relationship to political systems, movements and ideas critical of the United States and Western values. Hollander examines disparate phenomena, such as the . Simpson case, the banning of West Side Story in Amherst, Massachusetts, the popularity and exposu of Rigoberta Menchu, and the appeal of sports utility vehicles, which shed light on the major themes of the volume.

Similar books and articles. The Origins of Postcommunist Elites From Prague Spring to the Breakup of Czechoslovakia. Marx @ 2000 Late Marxist Perspectives. Antonio Callari, Stephen Cullenberg & Carole Biewener - 1995. The Balkanization of the West the Confluence of Postmodernism and Postcommunism.

Paul Hollander is professor emeritus of sociology at the University of. .Discontents: Postmodern and Postcommunist.

Paul Hollander is professor emeritus of sociology at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and a fellow of the David Center for Russian Studies at Harvard University. His books include Soviet and American Society, Political Pilgrims, The Survival of the Adversary Culture, and Anti-Americanism. Transaction Publishers, 2018.

Discontents: Postmodern and Postcommunist.

Sociologists, political scientists, and the general reader will find this book of great interest.

Discontents: Postmodern and Postcommunist (2002). The End of Commitment (2006). Hollander, Paul (October 1995). Digesting the collapse of communism : responses of Western intellectuals". The Only Super Power (2009). Extravagant Expectations (2011). From Benito Mussolini to Hugo Chávez: Intellectuals and a Century of Political Hero Worship (2016). American and Soviet Society (1969).

Find nearly any book by Paul Hollander. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. The Many Faces of Socialism: Comparative Sociology and Politics. ISBN 9780878554805 (978-0-87855-480-5) Hardcover, Transaction Publishers, 1983. Find signed collectible books: 'The Many Faces of Socialism: Comparative Sociology and Politics'.

What ails people at the present time in Western and especially American society is an inexhaustible subject. Discussion of these discontents in the United States in the last decade of the twentieth century leads to an obvious question: How much and what kind of discontents are possible in a society that has experienced over a decade of economic growth, close to full employment, hardly any inflation, falling crime rates, declining teenage pregnancies, and other good things? Is there anything to worry about in a country that has become the undisputed superpower of the world and no longer faces another hostile superpower such as the Soviet Union used to be? Paul Hollander wrestles with these and other questions in seeking to understand conditions and developments within American culture and society in the context of their relationship to political systems, movements and ideas critical of the United States and Western values. Hollander examines disparate phenomena, such as the O.J. Simpson case, the banning of West Side Story in Amherst, Massachusetts, the popularity and exposÚ of Rigoberta Menchu, and the appeal of sports utility vehicles, which shed light on the major themes of the volume. Topics include conflicts among American intellectuals (including disputes over the Kosovo intervention), the impact of postmodernism on higher education, the persisting appeal of victimhood in American society, the flaws of American sociology, academic specialists' failure to anticipate the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the new anti-Americanism in postcommunist societies. Among topics of historical interest are a survey of Western judgments and misjudgments of the communist systems; examination of the relative neglect of political violence in communist states, and analysis of officially enforced, secular-religious cult of communist rulers. Many of these writings are linked to the author's longstanding interest in why people accept or reject particular political systems and in the contradictory human needs and desires which condition and limit the pursuit of social and political ends. Sociologists, political scientists, and the general reader will find this book of great interest.

Comments: (3)
Binthars
Discontents is prolonged and efficient siege on the seductive and corrupt ideas that have hypnotized our cognitive elite. He thoroughly debunks the hogwash which poses as scholarship today. Hollander offers no circumlocution. No target evades him and, in a little over 400 pages, his pen turns the dogma of academia to verbose scrapple.
The book is comprised of 25 essays and most of them are brilliant. They should be read again and again. This is particularly true of his introduction, "`Imagined Tyranny'? Political Correctness Reconsidered," "Reassessing the Adversary Culture," "The Pursuit of Identity, Community and Social Justice," and, lastly, "Marxism and Western Intellectuals in the Post-communist Era."
The remainder are average or better with the exception being a piece regarding Coppola's film, "Godfather II." This was his only offering with a conclusion I disagreed with, and I regard its inclusion in the collection as a mistake.
Without question, Paul Hollander is an expert on the subject of which he writes. He is a Professor Emeritus of Sociology at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and a fellow of Russian Studies at Harvard University, but his career is miles from winding down as he will soon release a title on anti-Americanism.
Should Hollander be named to a college presidency, cultural Marxism would soon go the way of Khmer Rouge apologists. There would be no where to hide from his supervision. To him, a politically correct campus is one that includes the following: the presence of speech codes, advantages in financial aid, admission or recruitment for designated groups, an allowance for group self-segregation like in dormitories, freshman orientation programs drenched in leftist dogma, the presence of black studies, women studies, or gay studies, required courses in multiculturalism, required sensitivity training for staff, and, lastly, computing the profile of the school's average commencement speaker and whether they are consistently on the left of the political spectrum.
In my mind, the book's strongest passage is Hollander's dissection of what is known as "selective determinism." I acknowledge that some readers were already aware of this concept, but I was unaware of it until reading Discontents. Selective determinism suggests that, for some blessed members of the population, nothing they do is their fault.
This minority, which strangely makes up 70% of the population, is excused and forgiven because they are deemed oppressed and were embroidered with a pink letter "O" at birth. They are not individuals. Their lives have been steered by societal forces that, like a powerful undertow, drags them in directions they never intended to go.
In summation, Paul Hollander's Discontents documents the humane need to triumph over lies wherever we encounter them. The contributions of this exceptional man invigorate our side in the culture war; a side that stands for free speech, liberty, and honesty. As for me, I will not sell my personal copy nor loan it out, but, should I ever awake to find a Swedish PC Inspector armed with several pens and an assistant at the door, you can be sure I'll toss the text into a pre-constructed secret panel before inviting them in for a microscopic tour of Abba records and Jessie Jackson Cat in the Hat books on tape.
Anarawield
Professor Hollander is one of America's most pungent analysts of the sad state of American sociology, and has for many years been a courageous and outspoken critic of the dominance of the academic left on university campuses. The present volume is an anthology of some of his best writings from 1992 to the present. If you want to understand where such things as political correctness, affirmative action, post-modernism, deconstructionism, radical feminism, and selective intolerance come from, and what they really mean in the academic world and for the future of America, this is the book to read. This volume makes many unique contributions, but also updates and expands some concepts from Dr. Hollander's classic "The Survival of the Adversary Culture (1988)."
Marg
There are spelling errors, but the actual content of the book is excellent and rarely redundant.
It is definitely another good addition to the Communist defector bookshelf.
eBooks Related to Discontents: Postmodern and Postcommunist
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020