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eBook Disrobing the Aboriginal Industry: The Deception Behind Indigenous Cultural Preservation epub

by Albert Howard,Frances Widdowson

eBook Disrobing the Aboriginal Industry: The Deception Behind Indigenous Cultural Preservation epub
  • ISBN: 0773534210
  • Author: Albert Howard,Frances Widdowson
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press; 1 edition (October 24, 2008)
  • Pages: 336 pages
  • ePUB size: 1854 kb
  • FB2 size 1852 kb
  • Formats mbr doc mobi docx


by Frances Widdowson(Author), Albert Howard(Author). Disrobing the Aboriginal Industry does an excellent job of pointing out logical inconsistencies in the Aboriginal political movement - a matter of great practical as well as academic importance.

by Frances Widdowson(Author), Albert Howard(Author). Tom Flanagan, author of First Nations? Second Thoughts "Insightful, carefully argued and meticulously documented. John Richards, Simon Fraser University. Frances Widdowson is a visiting assistant professor of political science, Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, Memorial University of Newfoundland.

Request PDF On Sep 11, 2009, Raynald Harvey Lemelin and others published Disrobing the Aboriginal .

Disrobing the Aboriginal Industry book. Frances Widdowson, Albert Howard. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

Published by: McGill-Queen's University Press. Book Description: By examining the root causes of aboriginal problems, Frances Widdowson and Albert Howard expose the industry that has grown up around land claim settlements, showing that aboriginal policy development over the past thirty years has been manipulated by non-aboriginal lawyers and consultants.

book by Albert Howard. This title presents a convincing argument that the 'aboriginal industry' has failed to address the fundamental economic and cultural basis of native problems, leading instead to policies that offer a financial benefit to the leadership while entrenching the misery of most aboriginal people.

Cultural Preservation by Frances Widdowson & Albert Howard

Keywords: Disrobing, Aboriginal Industry, Frances, Indigenous cultural, Montral, Widdowson, Mcgill Queen, Albert Howard.

Keywords: Disrobing, Aboriginal Industry, Frances, Indigenous cultural, Montral, Widdowson, Mcgill Queen, Albert Howard. For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

By examining the root causes of aboriginal problems, Frances Widdowson and Albert Howard expose the indus.

2 Frances Widdowson and Albert Howard, Disrobing the Aboriginal Industry: The . In examining the response to Disrobing the Aboriginal Industry, the most common reaction is a refusal to engage with its arguments.

2 Frances Widdowson and Albert Howard, Disrobing the Aboriginal Industry: The Deception Behind Indigenous Cultural Preservation (Montreal: McGill-Queen‘s University Press, 2008). 3 Margaret Wente, ―What Dick Pound said was really dumb – and also true‖, The Globe and Mail, October 25, 2008, p. A21. 4 Ibid. Attempts to justify this refusal cite ethical grounds, maintaining that the book is so outrageous and offensive that it should not be publicly discussed.

Frances Widdowson has a PhD in political science and self-identifies as a. .Her husband is her co-author of their book "Disrobing the Aboriginal Industry:The Deception Behind Indigenous Cultural Preservation".

Frances Widdowson has a PhD in political science and self-identifies as a Marxist. In this "post-show discussion" video, watch from 13:33 to 15:29.

By examining the root causes of aboriginal problems, Frances Widdowson and Albert Howard expose the industry that has grown up around land claim settlements, showing that aboriginal policy development over the past thirty years has been manipulated by non-aboriginal lawyers and consultants. They analyse all the major aboriginal policies, examine issues that have received little critical attention - child care, health care, education, traditional knowledge - and propose the comprehensive government provision of health, education, and housing rather than deficient delivery through Native self-government.
Comments: (5)
Reemiel
Brilliant book in a sad kind of way - sad because it so accurately describes the mediocrity of Aboriginal affairs and the Aboriginal industry. What is scary is the fact that almost everything that is discussed in this book could be applied to the Aboriginal industry in Australia. Without people like Widdowson exposing the futility of the Aboriginal industry, I don't think urban based people can have any idea why the billions of dollars of their tax dollars that are being spent on Indigenous issues are not making any difference to the lives of vulnerable Aboriginal people.
Memuro
I am not an historical materialist but I would seriously enjoy debating its premises with the authors of this fine book. Their argument is elegant, logical and difficult to counter. They will inevitably attract the knee jerk accusation of racism from those who won't or can't debate with them on their own terms, that is logically. I have worked in the Australian Aboriginal industry for over thirty years. I am not Aboriginal but my wife is and, according to our law and custom, all of my descendants from now on can legitimately identify as Aboriginal. We have brought up our daughter to acknowledge her ancestry, all of it, and to be proud of all of it. She sees herself as a citizen of the world first and nobody's victim and is a proud blackfella - a term that is commonly used in our part of the world by Aboriginal people. She is bringing up our grandsons the same way. They are as proud of their whitefella heritage as they are of the black. They are of Mauritian Creole descent as well from their other grandmother. Of this they are also proud. They are nobody's victims either. The Aboriginal industry has always denied me a voice because I am not Indigenous and I don't toe the party line, while giving a powerful voice to many with a very tenuous connection to Aboriginality in any meaningful way at all. In this country 74% of those who identify produce children with those who do not and 85% of these offspring choose to identify and most of these live in souther cities. My wife proudly calls herself full blood (a term that is now not PC but still regularly used by those of the full descent who have never got onto this PC thing). She has been warned by a white, Melbourne based human rights lawyer that she could be charged under the racial discrimination act for publicly using the term 'southern white blackfella' (we live in the Northern Territory). That is what it has come to, a theatre of the absurd. We are both sick of urban based southern Australians who look like, talk like, think like whitefellas but who do have some Aboriginal ancestry joining the Aboriginal industry and confidently telling our government what is good for my wife's people when they have no knowledge of their culture, language, history, current problems or world view. Then there are the whitefellas, all of those who have made a decent living from promoting the victim stereotype that is destroying my wife's people - literally. We are sick and tired of burying our children. If you swap the word 'Australia' for 'Canada', 'Australians' for 'Canadians', this book hits several nails squarely on the head for us as well. We have witnessed decades of huge government effort and expenditure of tax payers' money on Aboriginal problems while life for my wife's people has got decidedly worse in almost all areas, as it has apparently for Aboriginal Canadians, because the Aboriginal industry has become corrupted and has almost totally lost its way. There is change on the way. My wife was elected to our Legislative Assembly to represent an electorate with 73% of it's population Aboriginal in remote communities. The other two candidates were Aboriginal, male as well. She managed an 18.5% swing against the incumbent. There were three electorates with only Aboriginal candidates. Her government is the first in our history to be led by an Aboriginal Australian. This fact is not celebrated by the Left or by the Aboriginal industry because it is proudly Conservative and the Chief Minister does not make a big deal of his Aboriginality, he doesn't claim to be what he is not. My wife's political philosophy would align itself pretty closely to that of the authors of this book. Political Correctness and racism are two sides of the same coin. They need each other to exist, neither are interested in the truth. We need to uncover and tell the truth if we are going to solve the problems that are killing both Australian and Canadian Aboriginal peoples and keeping them in a life of deep poverty, violence, ignorance and despair. This book goes a very long way in promoting that debate. No more cries of racism in response to logical argument. Be brave. Try responding with logical argument instead and let's solve some problems together. Read this book and think about it, then respond with reasoned argument not petty name calling.
Tantil
This book is amazing. Many people choose to believe that Aboriginal people are leading happy healthy lives, when often they are not. The Aboriginal industry presents an illusion.
Gavirus
This is a very controversial book that examines the current policies guiding Aboriginal affairs. It discusses how those that benefit from these policies are not Aboriginal people themsleves, but non-Aboriginal lawyers, consultants, linguists, etc. This book takes a positivist look at Aboriginal policies. It talks about the consequences of contanct between Aborignal people in a neolithic period of developement and Europeans who were in the beginning stages of capitalism. This book makes arguments that are very Eurocentric, but at the same time raises some very important questions about Aboriginal affairs. An open mind is required when reading this book, and it is important to remember that the authors are not criticizing Aboriginal people, but the policies that are applied to them. This is a point of view not often shared about this subject.
Rainpick
This book is neither a Native Studies nor Political Science book, as it indicates on its cover. This book is an uninformed, Anglo-centric diatribe that is racist in its intent.
The authors open with the thought that any criticism against the Aboriginal Industry is seen as racism, but really, it's just standing up against the system. If you have to explain that what you are saying is not racist, there is a good chance it is.

One of the authors claims to be a "consultant" for Native groups, but I can't see him doing an effective job, with his attitude towards First Nations, which is downtrodden, poor addicts, who don't have a say in what happens to them.

Some of the more outrageous claims in this book include the idea that (and this is a direct quote) " if it were not for the educational and socialization efforts provided by the residential schools aboriginal peoples would be even more marginalized and dysfunctional than they are today (26)." They argue that since hunting and gathering societies are bound to fail in this day in age, we did our First Nations a favour by putting them in residential schools.

They also make the statement that oral traditions are less `trustworthy' than written traditions, and even go so far as to state that some First Nations tribes fabricate oral traditions to get land claims and other monetary compensation (44). Was it not Mark Twain who wrote "The very ink with which history is written is merely fluid prejudice?"

The sad part is, I suspected that this book was going to be extremely prejudiced when I started, but I gave it a chance - luckily, I borrowed it from the library, since this is not a book I would be happy spending any amount of money on. I am only on Chapter two and I have already wondered how this book ever got published.

I do not recommend this book to anyone, unless you are alright with gross inaccuracies, sweeping generalizations and an Anglo centric smugness.
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