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eBook Scandal and Silence: Media Responses to Presidential Misconduct epub

by Robert M. Entman

eBook Scandal and Silence: Media Responses to Presidential Misconduct epub
  • ISBN: 0745647634
  • Author: Robert M. Entman
  • Genre: Other
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Polity; 1 edition (May 14, 2012)
  • Pages: 280 pages
  • ePUB size: 1812 kb
  • FB2 size 1287 kb
  • Formats doc lrf mbr txt


Scandal and Silence" by Robert Entman is a sophisticated analysis of the mainstream media's uneven treatment of presidential misconduct.

Scandal and Silence" by Robert Entman is a sophisticated analysis of the mainstream media's uneven treatment of presidential misconduct. Focusing on the years 1998 to 2008, Professor Entman challenges the conventional wisdom about media practices including how the industry might change for the better. Although the book is written primarily for an academic audience, the author's work deserves wide attention for its unique and powerful critique of the corporate media. Among the book's many merits, Professor Entman discusses the disproportionate amount of attention that.

Scandal and Silence argues for a different perspective Robert M. Entman is . Библиографические данные. Scandal and Silence: Media Responses to Presidential Misconduct Contemporary Political Communication.

Scandal and Silence argues for a different perspective This timely and engaging book challenges the conventional wisdom on media and scandal in the United States. The common view holds that media crave and actively pursue scandals whenever they sense corruption. Scandal and Silence argues for a different perspective.

Similar books to Scandal and Silence: Media Responses to Presidential .

Similar books to Scandal and Silence: Media Responses to Presidential Misconduct (Contemporary Political Communication). Kindle (5th Generation). Be warned up front Robert M. Entman's Scandal and Silence: Media Responses to Presidential Misconduct is not for the faint of vocabulary. The start of the book reads like the introduction to a graduate paper, which could scare off the average reader. The writing seems to become less dense once the introductory chapter ends though.

Author Robert M. Entman is a Professor of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University and his previous books . Entman is a Professor of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University and his previous books have garnered wide attention to A Call to Task! SCANDAL AND SILENCE: MEDIA REPONSES TO PRESIDENTIAL MISCONDCUT is certainly one of the more fascinating publications about the state of the media to break surface since the days of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein and their courage to make public the truth behind the Watergate scandal during the presidency of Richard Nixon.

Request PDF On Jan 2, 2014, Katharina Niemeyer and others published Scandal and Silence.

As in this new era, much technology is sophistically offered by connecting to the internet. No any problems to face, just for this day, you can really keep in mind that the book is the best book for you. We offer the best here to read. List of Illustrations Acknowledgments Dedication Chapter 1: High Crimes or Misdemeanors? Chapter 2: Analyzing Media and Presidential ScandalChapter 3: Private Lives in the Public Sphere. What Do Journalists Know, and When Do They Tell It?

Scandal and Silence argues for a different perspective. Robert M.

Scandal and Silence argues for a different perspective.

My newest book is Scandal and Silence: Media Responses to Presidential Misconduct (Polity, April 2012).

This timely and engaging book challenges the conventional wisdom onmedia and scandal in the United States. The common view holds thatmedia crave and actively pursue scandals whenever they sensecorruption. Scandal and Silence argues for a differentperspective. Using case studies from the period 1988-2008, it showsthat: Media neglect most corruption, providing too little, not toomuch scandal coverage;Scandals arise from rational, controlled processes, notemotional frenzies - and when scandals happen, it’s not themedia but governments and political parties that drive the processand any excesses that might occur;Significant scandals are indeed difficult for newsorganizations to initiate and harder for them to maintain and bringto appropriate closure;For these reasons cover-ups and lying often work, and truthremains essentially unrecorded, unremembered.Sometimes, bad behavior stimulates an avalanche of media attentionwith demonstrable political consequences, yet other times, equallyshoddy activity receives little notice. This book advances atheoretical model to explain these differences, revealing anunderlying logic to what might seem arbitrary and capriciousjournalism. Through case studies of the draft and military scandalsinvolving Dan Quayle, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton and John Kerry;alleged sexual misconduct of politicians including but not limitedto Clinton; and questionable financial dealings of Clinton andGeorge W Bush, the book builds a new understanding of mediascandals which will be essential reading for anyone concerned withthe relationship between media and democracy today.
Comments: (7)
Aradwyn
SCANDAL AND SILENCE: MEDIA REPONSES TO PRESIDENTIAL MISCONDCUT is certainly one of the more fascinating publications about the state of the media to break surface since the days of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein and their courage to make public the truth behind the Watergate scandal during the presidency of Richard Nixon. Author Robert M. Entman is a Professor of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University and his previous books have garnered wide attention to serious problems. But surely everything before this book pales in comparison. This engrossing and compelling tome addresses the manner in which the media deals with crises and scandals in Washington DC - capitalizing on the rather minor human weakness of the presidents while failing to rightly inform the public of the serious breaches of power the government decides should be submerged from public knowledge.

Entman covers the period from 1988 to 2008 (and in the course of examining current scandals he references famous incidents in the past), exploring the hungry media scandal machine, that information that drives viewers or readers attention and builds ratings, while electing to ignore far more compelling information that actually endangers the public by withholding facts that are truly critical. `To an outside observer, the Washington scandal machine may seem to operate at random. The same media that roundly condemned President George W. Bush for his passivity in the face of Hurricane Katrina failed to get worked up by his inaction as economic calamity loomed in 2008. The same news organizations that endlessly probed the marital psychology of Bill and Hillary Clinton passed over the unconventional aspects of John and Cindy McCain's marriage. And journalists came down hard on the 1988 vice presidential nominee Dan Quayle for using family connections to evade Vietnam by entering the National Guard, yet in 200 barely mentioned George W. Bush's similar record.'

Entman goes on to say `Although this book encompasses three presidential administrations, the bulk of attention falls on cases involving George W. Bush. This focus arises from the book's core purpose; to illuminate the processes by which potential scandals either expand into political significance or deflate with little impact on politics - with special reference to the latter, largely neglected outcome.' Entman's reportage includes extensive references and pages of data that support his reporting. He presents grafts and tables that demonstrate his findings and premises and in doing so he keeps the rhetoric rich and propulsive. It is interesting to note that as this book becomes available the public is beginning to watch a very important television series - THE NEWSROOM currently on HBO (see my review, rather hidden here on Amazon.com at http://www.amazon.com/Aficionado-Magazine-August-Daniels-Newsroom/dp/B0089YQWOM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1341684321&sr=8-1&keywords=the+newsroom+jeff+daniels) that addresses these issues. Entman writes brilliantly and with courage and will very likely find detractors. But this information is sorely needed in a time where democracy seems owned by the wealthy and the way to become President is to buy it with massive funding of campaigns.

In chapter 8 Entman provides the following powerful information: 'Having moved through scandals or non-scandals involving minimal impacts on the public welfare (infidelity), to those imposing some costs (evading the military draft or duties), to one of more substantial social damage (George W. Bush's insider trading and the SEC's passivity), we now focus on two potential scandals that might have arisen over high-cost presidential misconduct. The first concerned the Bush administration's campaign to justify the Iraq war by claiming Saddam Hussein could deploy weapon of Mass destruction (WMD) against the US or its European friends. Iraq possessed no such weapons. Despite leading the US into a costly war against Iraq based on a non-existent WMD threat, George W. Bush was not framed as scandalously incompetent or dishonest. How this potential presidential scandal was silenced, despite the war's yielding few benefits to the US in exchange for death, destruction, and immense financial cost -over $3 trillion - recapitulates and extends our model of scandal politics.' And he proceeds to detail the Valerie Plame Wilson scandal involving VP Cheney, Karl Rove and Scooter Libby, and on and on. This is definitive work on political scandal manipulation in the modern American press and it deserves the attention of every concerned citizen of this country. Highly Recommended. Grady Harp, July 12
Vozilkree
"Scandal and Silence" by Robert Entman is a sophisticated analysis of the mainstream media's uneven treatment of presidential misconduct. Focusing on the years 1998 to 2008, Professor Entman challenges the conventional wisdom about media practices including how the industry might change for the better. Although the book is written primarily for an academic audience, the author's work deserves wide attention for its unique and powerful critique of the corporate media.

Among the book's many merits, Professor Entman discusses the disproportionate amount of attention that the media draws to scandals that extract private versus public costs. Professor Entman's research indisputably shows that the media focuses excessively on private affairs (usually infidelity) that tend to have very little public impact; versus public scandals that often have profound impact on people's lives (such as financial impropriety). The author goes on to explain how the media gravitates towards stories of spectacle that are relatively easy to explain, produce and market to mass audiences; rather than run the risk of low ratings on stories that are more difficult to communicate.

However, Professor Entman asserts that the media's silence on these matters is often tantamount to complicity. Although there is no good reason to chase after every rumor, Professor Entman chastises the media for letting politicians off the hook when it is well-known among industry professionals that the personal behaviors of office seekers clashes with their party's stated policy positions. The author believes that voters have the right to know if their representatives are personally living by the values they purport to uphold.

On that point, Professor Entman's work implies that we might be close to passing a point of no return. Inasmuch as both major political parties pander to the same corporate donors, it might seem that the media no longer functions as a free and impartial watchdog of the public interest; rather, the media has become leashed to the narrow self-interests of the elite. Yet, the inevitability of scandal might yet serve some useful purpose if the media were to empower "scandal editors" to help ensure that scandals that meet specific criteria are covered evenly. The author believes this would produce more valuable information for public consumption about the issues that matter most to our democracy.

I highly recommend this outstanding book to everyone.
Akirg
Be warned up front Robert M. Entman's Scandal and Silence: Media Responses to Presidential Misconduct is not for the faint of vocabulary. The start of the book reads like the introduction to a graduate paper, which could scare off the average reader.

The writing seems to become less dense once the introductory chapter ends though. Assuming that the reader doesn't fear the discussion of methods, a few tables, and the multiple hypotheses, what the book eventually settles down into is a challenging of the conventional wisdom that depicts the print and broadcast media as scandal hawks that media crave and actively pursue scandals whenever they sense corruption.

Entman's thesis breaks down into four main points:

* Media neglect most corruption, providing too little, not too much, scandal coverage.
* Scandals arise from rational controlled processes, not emotional frenzies- and when scandals occur it's not media but government and political parties that drive the process.
* Significant scandals are difficult for news organizations to initiate, sustain, and bring to closure.
* For these reasons cover ups and lying often work, while truth remains unrecorded and unremembered.

The period covered by the study is 1988-2008, though Iran-Contra and the grandfather of modern political scandal, Watergate, is covered. These earlier scandals in spite of their magnitude serve to support the Entman thesis.

It's a difficult thesis to accept because its such a contrast to what we see every day in our newspapers and television. The image of the corruption infested politician is part of American culture. But Entman does a solid job of laying out this challenging thesis in a rational way without jarring the reader.
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