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eBook The Nanny Translator: Phrases & Words in Your Babysitter's Native Language: English/Spanish (Lilaguide) (Spanish and English Edition) epub

by Mimi Towle

eBook The Nanny Translator: Phrases & Words in Your Babysitter's Native Language: English/Spanish (Lilaguide) (Spanish and English Edition) epub
  • ISBN: 0972128670
  • Author: Mimi Towle
  • Genre: Parenting
  • Subcategory: Parenting
  • Language: Spanish English
  • Publisher: The Lilaguide; Bilingual edition (January 1, 2004)
  • Pages: 160 pages
  • ePUB size: 1958 kb
  • FB2 size 1317 kb
  • Formats lit doc lrf txt


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The Nanny Translator book.

Bilingual emergency contact forms at the front of the guide enable parents to determine precisely whom to contact in case of emergencies

Bilingual emergency contact forms at the front of the guide enable parents to determine precisely whom to contact in case of emergencies. Chapters cover phrases and words for sleeping, eating, dressing, indoor and outdoor activities, health and safety and much more. Alphabetical indexes and glossaries make finding appropriate phrases/words easy

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This pocket-sized guide provides handy translations of child care words and phrases in English and Spanish. Bilingual emergency contact forms at the front of the guide enable parents to determine precisely whom to contact in case of emergencies. Chapters cover phrases and words for sleeping, eating, dressing, indoor and outdoor activities, health and safety and much more. Alphabetical indexes and glossaries make finding appropriate phrases/words easy.

Comments: (7)
Уou ll never walk alone
This book has been a helpful resource for communicating with our nanny. The book is split into two halves -- English to Spanish (for native English speakers), and Espanol a Ingles (for native Spanish speakers). Each half is organized by scenario -- first meeting, at the playground, etc., and has a glossary at the end.

I only have two suggestions for the author. The first would be to put tabs into a future edition, so that it's easier to quickly find what you are looking for. The second would be to increase the size of the glossary. We find ourselves reaching for our Spanish/English dictionary quite often to find words that are not in the glossary. If the book had these two things, I would give it five stars.

I think this book has an unfairly low rating due to some other reviewers. To these reviewers, I can only say two things:

1) To the reviewer who says to get a standard Spanish/English dictionary: such a dictionary won't be organized by usage scenarios encountered by parents and care providers. It also is unlikely to words used in daycare situations, such as diaper, EpiPen, etc. I myself have had six years of Spanish instruction, and never had a single lesson that covered daycare-oriented words.

2) The the reviewer who says that this book is about keeping nannies in line: not sure where you get this idea. If anything, learning to speak another's language is a sign of respect for their culture and heritage. Further, there is nothing dishonorable providing day care as a nanny.
Axebourne
After reading the negative reviews below I was kind of turned off, but I ended up getting the book anyway since my family was hosting a Spanish aupair for the summer and since my Spanish is pretty aweful, I thought it might come in handy.

To be honest, I don't understand what the big deal is that the other reviewers were ranting about. It may be that the publisher re-released the title because it isn't called "Nanny Translator" anymore. The version I got is called "Bilingual Babycare - English/Spanish"

I find the book neither offensive nor racist. I guess if you have issues with hiring a Spanish-speaking nanny or child care provider, then this book isn't for you. In my case it simply is a reality that I don't speak Spanish well enough to feel confident that I'm communicating properly all the time. The book has great bilingual emergency contact forms and allergy forms in the front that gave me peace of mind that there wouldn't be any mixups about how to get a hold of my husband or myself in case of an emergency.

The book is split up into two parts - the first is English to Spanish and the second is Spanish to English. The English to Spanish tries to cover everything from hiring a babysitter (not necessary inour case) to clothing, bathing, dressing, playing, health and safety. The Spanish to English section covers the same issues but from the vantage point of the child care provider.

All in all I think it's a great and handy learning tool. I have definitely learned a bunch of new words and phrases that I wouldn't have found in a regular English-Spanish phrase book (things like diaper rash, play groups, playgroups,etc.). It's a neat idea and if you are in (or are thinking about creating) a bilingual English/Spanish home environment I strongly recommend getting this book...
Pemand
We recently hired a mostly-spanish speaking nanny for our 5 month old daughter. This book is the best (of the four that I bought) for helping us to communicate with each other. Because it has both an english and a spanish section, we can both use it. I would highly recommend this book. It has a many useful phrases that are specific to baby care that are missing from other books.
Kinashand
We have been very pleased with this book. Both our childcare provider and I have been able to use it interchangeably on the occassons when we are having trouble understanding each other, and I found it very reassuring to know that we were on the same page with regard to health and safety issues. And though you could just get a spanish/english dictionary, I found the the nanny translator provided most all of the childcare phrases I could possibly need in one place, making it considerably easier than a simple dictionary.
Sarin
While wandering through the bookstore, past the puzzle sets and agendas, by the stationary and card sets, was the section with novelty titles like "Everything You Need To Know By Age 30" and "The Anti-bride's Wedding Planning Guide." Tucked away in there was something called "The Nanny Translator."
The what? Something that billed itself as a helpful little Spanish-English dictionary replete with words like detergent, potty training and lima beans. Conspicously absent were things like respect and immigration-- as in, "If you don't
respect me, I will report you to immigration!"
This is a guide for people who know no Spanish, and whose only interest in learning the language is to instruct the maid as to the proper way to clean the toilet.

It is undoubtedly important to clearly and effectively communicate with anyone who is caring for your children-- though why you would put them in the care of someone who doesn't undertsand you and you don't understand is totally beyond me. This book, however, was not about communication. Instead, it conveyed and reinforced useless stereotypes. It seemed to capture the idea that there are Hispanics in this country only to serve, and that your communication with them should be limited to their role as servants. That they are uneducated and fit for only low-skill, low wage jobs, etc.
Not that your neighbors, classmates, lawyers and the rest, might actually be Hispanic too.
If you want to create a bilingual household, the Nanny Translator is a useless place to start.
Ausstan
Can someone explain why this book is $114.? I don't get it. I actually haven't read it but want to order but this makes no sense.
GWEZJ
the NANNY translator?
are you kidding?
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