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eBook Dispersed City of the Plains epub

by Joan Stone,J. William Carswell,Harris Stone

eBook Dispersed City of the Plains epub
  • ISBN: 0853459932
  • Author: Joan Stone,J. William Carswell,Harris Stone
  • Genre: Photography
  • Subcategory: Architecture
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Monthly Review Press (December 1, 1998)
  • Pages: 192 pages
  • ePUB size: 1728 kb
  • FB2 size 1493 kb
  • Formats doc rtf doc txt


Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Dispersed City of the Plains by Harris . J. William Carswell, Harris Stone, Joan Stone.

Получить до Пт, 31 янв - Вт, 3 мар от Illinois, США., Состояние: Совершенно новый. 30-дневный возврат товаров - Покупатель оплачивает обратную доставку товара. Dispersed City of the Plains.

When Harris Stone learned that he had cancer and a limited time to continue his work, chapters one and two of Dispersed City of the Plains .

When Harris Stone learned that he had cancer and a limited time to continue his work, chapters one and two of Dispersed City of the Plains had been completed, but only a typed text existed for chapters three and four. I took on the handwriting for the final pages, and J. William Carswell, a colleague in architecture at the University of Kansas, took on the drawings.

Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Joan Stone's books. William Carswell. Joan Stone’s Followers. None yet. Joan Stone. A Letter to Myself to Water.

Dispersed City of the Plains inventively pumps fresh air into the debate about what constitutes city building at the end of the twentieth century. It is a book that not only questions authority but supplies an alternative vision.

Author of Workbook of an unsuccessful architect, Dispersed city of the Plains, Chemistry of a Lemon, Hands-on, hands-off, Monuments and main streets. Created April 1, 2008.

Stone of Farewell is the middle novel in Tad Williams' Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn trilogy

Stone of Farewell is the middle novel in Tad Williams' Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn trilogy. The saga develops the narrative started in The Dragonbone Chair and substantially is focused on Simon, a former kitchen servant in the largest castle in the land. Simon has almost accidentally killed a dragon and in doing so the dragon’s blood, splashing him has given him a white hair streak. This results in his growing renown and him becoming known as "Snowlock"

The book succeeds on several intellectual levels: it presents valuable historical references for the development of towns and cities on the Great Plains; it exposes the materiality and construction, and painful choices, in the restoration and rehabilitation of historic structures; and it lends a frame of values and iconographic references to the overlooked and little appreciated dispersed places.

The Book of Stones has elevated the spiritual knowledge of crystals into a higher form. The classification of each stone is impeccable, along with wonderful photos-creating an intimate connection with a wide variety of minerals. This book offers us all an opportunity to sharpen our skills and renew our interest in the crystal healing world. I started reading this book very excited to learn new metaphysical properties of the stones however, it was very quickly brought to my attention that these stones are not named accurately when I called my local gemstores to find an "amulet stone" or "circle stone".

"With São Paulo, Tokyo, New Delhi, Mexico City, and Teheran rapidly approaching densities that are environmentally and emotionally unfit for human habitation, the need for urban planning has never been more pressing. Dispersed City of the Plains inventively pumps fresh air into the debate about what constitutes city building at the end of the twentieth century. It is a book that not only questions authority but supplies an alternative vision."--James Stewart Polshek, FAIA, Polshek and Partners

Stone argues that the formation of towns has been based largely on the play of economic forces, without sentiment or prior attachment to place. In envisioning humane and rational improvements, he suggests that older notions of settlement be left behind in order to come to terms with the unfolding realities of the dispersed city.

Comments: (2)
Kalv
This is a challenging, original analysis of the meaning of the built environment of the Great Plains. The author begins much the way that Walter Prescott Webb did in his pioneering work on the same subject, by analyzing the building blocks that organize space and the economy of the region, in this instance grain elevators, barbed wire, and windmills. He then moves through types of housing, and communities from hamlet to major city.
Harris Stone's basic thesis is threefold: 1. The Great Plains experienced a fundamentally different pattern of settlement than the Eastern U.S., because the land was subdivided before settlers arrived; 2. European models of city form are not valid for analyzing the built environment of the Plains; 3. Instead, the settlement pattern of the Plains is a work in progress that anticipates the impact of today's information-age economy, and it should be evaluated accordingly.
The author's text is handwritten, with his own drawings illustrating his points. His ideas are spare and challenge the reader to participate and "fill in the blanks." His style is somewhat akin to the way Jane Jacobs analyzes city life, while his conclusions contrast dramatically with hers.
There is also a poignance that permeates the book, because Harris Stone was dying of cancer as he wrote it. Too weak to finish preparation of the text for publishing, his wife and colleagues at the University of Kansas School of Architecture completed the final few pages, in a different style of handwriting and illustration. One mourns the loss of so original a thinker, as one is simultaneously stimulated by his text.
Геракл
I was a student of Harris Stone's for several classes during my career at KU's School of Architecture and Urban Design in the 1980's. The book "Dispersed City of the Plains" is just so very typical of Harris. Harris was one of the best Critics (that's the code word for Architecture Teacher, Professor, etc.) that I ever had. He was truely wise. Stone had a way of looking beyond what was fashionable to print in the Professional Journals to see the truth in the Architecture. Harris always taught us, as students in Kansas, to be proud of our herritage. He had the ability to see the art in what others disregarded as mundane and below their recognition. Harris was a proponent for the masses, the end users of Architecture. It didn't matter to him how great a building was proclaimed if it didn't serve it's purpose for it's users. Stone's books always remind us to design for the people, and the environment, not the Journals.
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