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eBook Chagall: A Biography epub

by Jackie Wullschlager

eBook Chagall: A Biography epub
  • ISBN: 037541455X
  • Author: Jackie Wullschlager
  • Genre: Photography
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Knopf; 1 edition (October 21, 2008)
  • Pages: 608 pages
  • ePUB size: 1743 kb
  • FB2 size 1574 kb
  • Formats mbr mobi lit rtf


by. Jackie Wullschläger. Chagall, Marc, - 1887-1985, Artists - Russia (Federation) - Biography.

by. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

About this Chagall biography, however, there is no stepping around it: some crucial animating spark has gone missing

Jackie Wullschlager's new biography provides an extraordinary look at the painter's evolution, from a humble Jewish village in Russia, to chaotic St. Petersburg during the revolution, to full flower in Paris and beyond. The depth of detail is astonishing; the illustrations and color plates beautifully illustrate the many stages of Chagall's artistic development; and Wullschlager dissects Chagall's marriages in loving detail, teasing out the complexities of dependence and power that bound (but also enriched) them.

Derek Jacobi reads from Jackie Wullschlager's biography and tells of the artist's childhood in Vitebsk.

Jackie Wullschlager's biograpy is a magnificent achievement A fine biography, the best from the generation which did not know Chagall personally

Jackie Wullschlager's biograpy is a magnificent achievement. Chagall, one of the great recyclers in art history, emerges as a shallow and unlikable figure. A fine biography, the best from the generation which did not know Chagall personally. To what extent the weakness of relying on the perceptions and judgments of others is offset by the objectivity of having had no contact positive or negative with the subject is a matter for experts on Chagall and historiographers, not the lay reader.

Throughout, as Jackie Wullschlager makes plain in this groundbreaking biography, he never ceased giving form on. .Wullschlager explores in detail Chagall’s complex relationship with Russia and makes clear the Russian dimension he brought to Western modernism

Throughout, as Jackie Wullschlager makes plain in this groundbreaking biography, he never ceased giving form on canvas to his dreams, longings, and memories. His subject, more often than not, was the shtetl life of his childhood, the wooden huts and synagogues, the goatherds, rabbis, and violinists-the whole lost world of Eastern European Jewry. Wullschlager explores in detail Chagall’s complex relationship with Russia and makes clear the Russian dimension he brought to Western modernism. She shows how, as André Breton put it, under his sole impulse, metaphor made its triumphal entry into modern painting, and helped shape the new surrealist movement.

Jackie Wullschlager shows us all this and more, in her beautifully produced book. She has talked to Chagall's surviving friends, she has a sharp sense of what is gorgeously original in the paintings and also of what is tediously self-cannibalising, and she writes prose that registers intense feeling yet is coolly well organised. The last half of Wullschlager's book is as well done as the first, but it leaves us in no doubt that while Chagall continued to produce a few late masterworks (some great drawings, The White Crucifixion, the Matisse-like late works in glass), the flame of his genius undoubtedly and gradually died down.

Throughout, as Jackie Wullschlager makes plain in this groundbreaking biography, he never ceased giving form on canvas to his dreams, longings, and memories.

Jackie Wullschlager's wonderful biography moves with sure speed and precise drama - . Byatt Financial Times This is a masterly biography

Jackie Wullschlager's wonderful biography moves with sure speed and precise drama - . Byatt Financial Times This is a masterly biography. Jackie Wullschlager has a painter's eye, a historian's grasp of context and a novelist's pace and momentum. She gives back to Chagall's paintings the sharpness and strangeness that they had for his contemporaries. so gripping that I couldn't put the book down - Hilary Spurling Added to basket.

Jackie Wullschlager (geboren 1962 in London . Chagall: a biography. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2008.

Jackie Wullschlager (geboren 1962 in London ), auch Jackie Wullschläger, ist eine britische Kunstkritikerin. Jackie Wullschlager arbeitet als Kunstkritikerin bei der Financial Times, wo sie eine regelmäßige Kolumne hat. Sie schrieb Beiträge für, eine Biografie von viktorianischen Kinderbuchautoren und eine Biografie des Märchenautors Hans Christian Andersen. Ihre Chagall-Biografie stand 2008 auf der Shortlist für Biografie des Costa Book Awards, beim Duff Cooper Prize und 2009 beim Jewish Quarterly-Wingate Prize Chagall: a biography. Aki Kuroda: Cosmocity.

“When Matisse dies,” Pablo Picasso remarked in the 1950s, “Chagall will be the only painter left who understands what color really is.” As a pioneer of modernism and one of the greatest figurative artists of the twentieth century, Marc Chagall achieved fame and fortune, and over the course of a long career created some of the best-known and most-loved paintings of our time. Yet behind this triumph lay struggle, heartbreak, bitterness, frustration, lost love, exile—and above all the miracle of survival.Born into near poverty in Russia in 1887, the son of a Jewish herring merchant, Chagall fled the repressive “potato-colored” tsarist empire in 1911 for Paris. There he worked alongside Modigliani and Léger in the tumbledown tenement called La Ruche, where “one either died or came out famous.” But turmoil lay ahead—war and revolution; a period as an improbable artistic commissar in the young Soviet Union; a difficult existence in Weimar Germany, occupied France, and eventually the United States. Throughout, as Jackie Wullschlager makes plain in this groundbreaking biography, he never ceased giving form on canvas to his dreams, longings, and memories. His subject, more often than not, was the shtetl life of his childhood, the wooden huts and synagogues, the goatherds, rabbis, and violinists—the whole lost world of Eastern European Jewry. Wullschlager brilliantly describes this world and evokes the characters who peopled it: Chagall’s passionate, energetic mother, Feiga-Ita; his eccentric fellow painter and teacher Bakst; his clever, intense first wife, Bella; their glamorous daughter, Ida; his tough-minded final companion and wife, Vava; and the colorful, tragic array of artist, actor, and writer friends who perished under the Stalinist regime.Wullschlager explores in detail Chagall’s complex relationship with Russia and makes clear the Russian dimension he brought to Western modernism. She shows how, as André Breton put it, “under his sole impulse, metaphor made its triumphal entry into modern painting,” and helped shape the new surrealist movement. As art critic of the Financial Times, she provides a breadth of knowledge on Chagall’s work, and at the same time as an experienced biographer she brings Chagall the man fully to life—ambitious, charming, suspicious, funny, contradictory, dependent, but above all obsessively determined to produce art of singular beauty and emotional depth.Drawing upon hitherto unseen archival material, including numerous letters from the family collection in Paris, and illustrated with nearly two hundred paintings, drawings, and photographs, Chagall is a landmark biography to rank with Hilary Spurling’s Matisse and John Richardson’s Picasso.
Comments: (7)
Beazekelv
The service and shipping was perfect. I love the book. I have been an admirer of his art for many years. Now I will learn about his life! Thank you.
Chillhunter
Jackie Wullschlager's new biography provides an extraordinary look at the painter's evolution, from a humble Jewish village in Russia, to chaotic St. Petersburg during the revolution, to full flower in Paris and beyond. The depth of detail is astonishing; the illustrations and color plates beautifully illustrate the many stages of Chagall's artistic development; and Wullschlager dissects Chagall's marriages in loving detail, teasing out the complexities of dependence and power that bound (but also enriched) them. There is a fine early example of Chagall telling a buyer that he didn't price his paintings, then asking Bella to negotiate as the buyer (looking in a mirror) noticed Chagall signalling the price to his wife. Much later it fell to Vava, his third wife, "to be the hard exterior front while Chagall played her soft, helpless companion" (504). He always put his inner creative life first.

I like books that are succinct, that use one example or one quotation rather than two or three, and that offer crisp analysis instead of restatement. I skimmed many pages in the book's first half, where the author is finding her direction. Most readers will wish that Knopf had hired a senior editor to go over the book and, especially in the first half, to mark deletions for the author to consider.

That said, this biography incisively shows the horrendous dislocations that an artist risks in abandoning his homeland and his religion, and the ways in which nostalgia for the past became one of Chagall's enduring themes even as he broke new ground in Paris and Vence.
Pruster
People who enjoy the art created by Marc Chagall certainly will appreciate this fine biography. (However, it is neither an in-depth review of all his individual works of art nor, indeed, of his lasting place in the greater world of art history.)

The informed author, Jackie Wullschlager, helps the reader to understand Chagall by explaining his trying start in the backwater Russian town of Vitebsk, his deep Jewish heritage, and his darting amongst and away from the horrific European upheavals of the first half of the last century.

Ms.Wullschlager is especially informative about the four women who are vital to an understanding of Chagall's adult life: Bella, Virginia, Vava, and his daughter Ida.

Like many great artists, Chagall's family life and politics were often a mess. He was a flawed person. But his early paintings and late stained-glass windows remain, and they continue to speak for themselves.
Cointrius
Received in perfect condition. 5 Star! First Edition. Jackie Wullschlager has written a masterpiece to complement her subject's masterpiece after masterpiece. An amazing undertaking that reads like a novel. The color reproductions are superb. This is a book that could change your life. Once you meet Chagall you'll never be the same. Thank you. - H
Enila
An excellent biographical work. Thorough and inclusive in all respects.
terostr
art history that is engaging, well-researched.
Simple
This was a monster of a literary piece but well worth the read!
Disappointing. I’ve seen many of Chagall’s paintings, including his ceiling at the Paris Opera, and am familiar with some of the Hasidic tales that inspired him. I was eager to learn more about his technique and how he arrived at his themes, but there was very little actual painting in this biography of a painter. Mostly it’s about where he was at a point in time, who was with him, what they did, and where he went next, and who was with him, and what they did, and where he went . . . and after a while I became rather bored. Perhaps worst of all, indeed hard to believe, is that the reproductions at the back of the book, some of them quite good, were not linked to the related text. I’ve already given it away.
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