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eBook Boggs: A Comedy of Values epub

by Lawrence Weschler

eBook Boggs: A Comedy of Values epub
  • ISBN: 0226893960
  • Author: Lawrence Weschler
  • Genre: Photography
  • Subcategory: History & Criticism
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (November 15, 2000)
  • Pages: 176 pages
  • ePUB size: 1581 kb
  • FB2 size 1489 kb
  • Formats docx lrf rtf azw


Lawrence Weschler, a recipient of the prestigious Lannan Literary Award for 1998, is the author of numerous books, includingCalamities of Exile: Three Nonfiction Novellas, and Mr. Wilson's Cabinet of Wonder, which was a finalist for both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Series: Comedy of Values. Paperback: 176 pages.

Boggs and his work are chronicled in Boggs: A Comedy of Values, by Lawrence Weschler, published by the University of Chicago Press. Boggs: A Comedy of Values. Legality and arrests. Police bust Boggs at the Young Unknowns Gallery, London, 1986. Boggs viewed his "transactions" as a type of performance art, but the authorities often viewed them with suspicion. Boggs aimed to have his audience question and investigate just what it is that makes "money" valuable in the first place. University of Chicago Press. ISBN 978-0-226-89396-9.

In this highly entertaining book, Lawrence Weschler chronicles the antics of J. S. G. Boggs, an artist whose consuming passion is money, or perhaps more precisely, value. Boggs draws money-paper notes in standard currencies from all over the world-and tries to spend his drawings

In this highly entertaining book, Lawrence Weschler chronicles the antics of J. Boggs draws money-paper notes in standard currencies from all over the world-and tries to spend his drawings. It is a practice that regularly lands him in trouble with treasury police around the globe and provokes fundamental questions regarding the value of art and the value of money. Lawrence Weschler, who evidently admires -something not difficult to do-has written what may be the most extraordinary biography.

Boggs: A Comedy of Values (1999). Vermeer in Bosnia (2004). Everything That Rises: A Book of Convergences (2006). True To Life: Twenty-Five Years of Conversations with David Hockney (2008).

Dec 28, 2008 Emily rated it it was amazing. A lot of books about money have long hold lists at the library right now (go figure!), but somehow this isn't one of them.

His Passions and Wonders series currently comprises Seeing is Forgetting the Name of the Thing One Sees: A Life of Contemporary Artist Robert Irwin (1982); David Hockney’s Cameraworks (1984); Mr. Wilson’s Cabinet of Wonder (1995); A Wanderer in the Perfect City: Selected Passion Pieces (1998) Boggs: A Comedy of Values (1999); Robert Irwin: Getty Garden (2002); Vermeer in Bosnia (2004); and Everything that Rises: A Book of Convergences (February 2006)

The Apollo Belvedere, which Winckelmann thought the 'highest ideal of art', is actually a Roman copy in marble of an old Greek bronze

The Apollo Belvedere, which Winckelmann thought the 'highest ideal of art', is actually a Roman copy in marble of an old Greek bronze. In the seventeenth century, the French Academy in Rome taught its students to copy 'everything beautiful', a process which resulted in French government buildings from Djibouti to Calais being full of good, bad and mediocre knock-offs of something else.

In this highly entertaining book, Lawrence Weschler chronicles the antics of J. S. G. Boggs, an artist whose consuming passion is money, or perhaps more precisely, value. Boggs draws money-paper notes in standard currencies from all over the world-and tries to spend his drawings. It is a practice that regularly lands him in trouble with treasury police around the globe and provokes fundamental questions regarding the value of art and the value of money.
Comments: (7)
Nakora
I met Boggs years ago at a Coin Show. I saw his wonderful art but I never knew the terrific story behind it. This volume explains the complex story behind the very interesting Mister J.S.G. Boggs. I wish I would have purchased one of his pieces back then as they're way more expensive now, especially since he has recently passed away. For me this book was a delight from start to finish, with much more historical money facts than I expected. It's really a great read.
VAZGINO
A fun, easy read, and it really should make you think about our relationship with money. If you were to accept a Boggs bill in payment, it's not because he says it has value... it's because you *agree* it has value. And since modern money is no longer backed by silver and/or gold, what makes a Boggs any different from a "real" bill?

Boggs himself is a fascinating character; Wechsler's prose wanders, but always manages to come back to the point he was trying to make, and the meandering is interesting too. Recommended.

And if you get the opportunity to see any of Boggs' work, go see it.
Antuiserum
The story told in this book is fasccinating -- of a man whose art directly addresses the questions: what is money? what does money mean to us? how does money work? Boggs is an artist who creates beuatiful work, and does it in a way that it also drives to the heart of the American monetary system. The transactional part of his art is fascinating, and is told in an engaging amnner in this book.
The book suffers from being an enlargement of a fascinating article on the same subject. The borders between the original material and that added to make it a book-length piece are sometimes glaring. The book would have been more successful if the text were limited to the original article, and the collection of images were expanded.
Hirah
This book did more to make me think about the meaning of money and the value of art than anything I've ever read. What Boggs did was fine art and performance art, comedy and commentary, sublime and subversive. If you've ever wondered why we endow little pieces of paper with such extraordinary value then you should take a the short romp through the magical world of JSG Boggs.
Eta
This artist has good humor. Makes you question the value of art LITERALLY. He goes out and eats and pays with a $100 bill that he drew while he was eating. He asks the waiter if he will value his drawing as $100 because he drew it and the waiter thinks about it and takes it. Theres a lot of situations he gets himself into doing this. He usually gets away with it. I recommend this book if you are looking for an interesting book.
Fearlessrunner
As described. Prompt shipping.
Gabar
I came across a copy of this book, that I had read over 10 years ago,
and wanted to 'plug' it for the great joy it gave me.
This book highlights the foolishness of most people in regards to paper money,
and that this artist was thumbing his nose at the worship of it,
with his hand drawn money.
Very well written book, it is on my personal list of great books,
easily reread over and over.
A must read gift for the smart anarchist in your family, be she Libertarian leaning
or just old fashioned hell raiser.
Give as a gift, but buy two copies - keep one for yourself.
The debate about what constitutes value has been tackled numerous times, but this may be the most humorous and interesting take on the subject. JSG Boggs shoves the question of value into our faces by drawing money and trying to pass it off - not as real money, but as real value. The book follows Boggs as he takes his "what is value" sideshow on the road, and into several court appearances. By the end, you'll see money in a whole new light as Boggs rides into the sunset with a pocket full of "cash."
The book loses its touch (and its uniqueness) when Mr. Weschler wanders into a generic discussion of the history of money. Overall, the author's treatment does just what it should - get out of the way and let Boggs paint a marvelous story.
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