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eBook Born to Run: The Bruce Springsteen Story epub

by Dave Marsh

eBook Born to Run: The Bruce Springsteen Story epub
  • ISBN: 0385154437
  • Author: Dave Marsh
  • Genre: Photography
  • Subcategory: Music
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Doubleday; 1st edition (September 1, 1979)
  • Pages: 176 pages
  • ePUB size: 1165 kb
  • FB2 size 1625 kb
  • Formats mbr azw doc docx


Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Born to Run: The Bruce Springsteen Story as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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June 10, 2002 In & To Run', biographer Dave Marsh successfully immerses the reader in the origin and background of both . In Springsteen, Marsh has a subject on which he is absolutely incapable of objectivity.

June 10, 2002 In & To Run', biographer Dave Marsh successfully immerses the reader in the origin and background of both Bruce Springteen and the Jersey Shore of the sixties and seventies. Some might chafe at the occasionally purple prose (and praise), but Marsh's tendency (not always forgivable) towards hyperbole and emotionalism is indicative of the genuinely k-And-Roll mandate by which its subjects once lived their lives.

Marsh has published four books about singer/musician Bruce Springsteen. Born to Run: The Bruce Springsteen Story, (Doubleday) 1979. The Book of Rock Lists, (Dell) 1980. Elvis, (Times Books) 1982.

The newsletter has since been renamed Rock and Rap Confidential. Marsh contributed to the 1994 book Mid-Life Confidential, a book about and by the Rock Bottom Remainders, a rock band composed of American authors  .

Bruce Springsteen's official music video for 'Born To Run'. suicide rap We gotta get out while we're young & tramps like us, baby we were born to run. Born To Run. Исполнитель.

Marsh's best Springsteen book. Published by Thriftbooks. June 10, 2002In & To Run', biographer Dave Marsh successfully immerses the reader in the origin and background of both Bruce Springteen and the Jersey Shore of the sixties and seventies. com User, 13 years ago. Okay, I'll be the first to admit that Dave Marsh has a Springsteen goo-goo, but "Born To Run", which I believe is his first book on Bruce, suffers quite a bit less for it than the books that followed. Here, Marsh did a nice job of describing Springsteen's childhood and early adulthood and didn't have quite as much time and space to worship.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on August 12, 2015

Springsteen, Bruce, Rock musicians. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on August 12, 2015. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Born to Run by Bruce Springsteen (Hardback, 2016). Country of Publication. Out of My Depth by Anne Darwin (Paperback, 2016). Biographies & Autobiographies.

A sketch by comedy duo Scharpling & Wurster once satirized this long-winded phenomenon with a fictionalized biography entitled Darkness on the River’s Edge in the . From Greetings to the Promise: Bruce Springsteen: The Story Behind the Albums. But the best writing on Springsteen remains thrilling.

A biography highlighting the career of the well-known rock musician.
Comments: (6)
Whitebinder
My brother recommended this book to me. As Bruce is from my neck of the woods in NJ, I knew the places he spoke of, and I got some insight into how he came up. It will be very interesting to have read in light of Springsteen's soon to be released book of the same name.
Groll
I had a copy of the original printing of the book back in the early 80's. I was glad to be able to get another copy so similar to the original book.
Bolanim
I was looking for a biography of Bruce Springsteen so read this one. This is a critique of Springsteen's albums, songs and shows. It does tell you when he was born and goes into some details about his first bands, including who was in them. But if you're looking for an in-depth study of what Bruce Springsteen did that made him "The Boss," you won't find it here. Marsh's theories about Rock, Punk, Pop and Disco are a highly personalized POV driven largely from the perspective of exactly when he grew up. Historically, it is easy to disagree with him. Most of this book is a psudopsychological study of what he thinks Springsteen was talking about in each album and many songs up to and including "Darkness At the Edge of Town." If you love Springsteen, as I do, you'll no doubt find this interesting at least as far as you agree with Marsh. But if you want to know the family dynamics that drove Springsteen, the real issues around his short-lived college career, the exact circumstance around his traumatic motorcycle accident, how he learned to play guitar and how he learned to sing as he does, the whole story around his gigs at The Stone Pony, how he learned to command a stage, any depth to his personality, talent, and interactive behavior, you will not find them here. This "biography" is a lot more about what Dave Marsh thinks about Bruce Springsteen than it is about Springsteen, himself. When you consider the depth of detail a writer like David McCullough can raise about people dead 100 years, am I expecting too much to want that kind of detail about a living person? Personally, I don't think so.
Jerinovir
June 10, 2002
In `Born To Run', biographer Dave Marsh successfully
immerses the reader in the origin and background of
both Bruce Springteen and the Jersey Shore of the
sixties and seventies. Some might chafe at the
occasionally purple prose (and praise), but Marsh's
tendency (not always forgivable) towards hyperbole
and emotionalism is indicative of the genuinely
live-or-die-with-Rock-And-Roll mandate by which its
subjects once lived their lives.
Particularly strong is the first half of the book,
wherein Marsh effectively paints New Jersey's
familial sixties Rock And Roll scene, the sort of
rebellious regional musical brewing pot that has
reinvented itself repeatedly across the continent
in any number of regions over the last thirty years.
The difference here is that Bruce's was the first
generation of working class youths to grow up in the
shadow of Elvis, and the Beatles, and Motown, and
rock's first great era. To these kids, Rock And Roll
was more than just something interesting to listen to
on your phonograph before supper. It was a revelation,
almost a religion.
Once the scene shifts to the late seventies and the
music industry, Marsh's take on things skews further.
His deification of Springsteen seems to be based on
little more than Bruce's having managed to not grow
a pot belly, "sell out", beat up his girlfriend, or
get busted for drugs. (Although, admittedly, that
does put the man in rare company for the times.)
The companion book to this effort, `Glory Days', isn't
too interesting, but `Born To Run', whether or not you
dig Bruce's music, packs a potent punch. As a glimpse
into an age of innocence and passion, it's inspiring
and re-readable . . .
. . . and it'll make you want to start a band and hit
the road.
Abuseyourdna
Dave Marsh may be THE most pompous writer to ever cover popular music, and he is completely blind to his own prejudices. He is incapable of defending his analysis, but rather hands out his opinions with an air that utterly dismisses any thought that they might be anything short of proven fact.
In Springsteen, Marsh has a subject on which he is absolutely incapable of objectivity. According to Marsh, Springsteen has never written, much less recorded, a weak song. Marsh's attempt to assign profound meaning to mediocrities such as "Drive All Night" and "The Price You Pay" would be funny if not offered with such smug seriousness.
That said, the book offers much good early biographical information, even if it is very one-sided. However, an artist like Springsteen deserves the attention of a writer willing to be objective about the subject.
Pad
Okay, I'll be the first to admit that Dave Marsh has a Springsteen goo-goo, but "Born To Run", which I believe is his first book on Bruce, suffers quite a bit less for it than the books that followed. Here, Marsh did a nice job of describing Springsteen's childhood and early adulthood and didn't have quite as much time and space to worship. I bought this book as a beach read in 1984, and for a while I found myself referring back to it fairly regularly, but since reading the others in Marsh's Springsteen line-up, I've kind of retired it to the status of fondly remembered relic. Bruce just isn't the same anymore either.
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