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eBook More Memories epub

by T. Carter,Ralph Emery

eBook More Memories epub
  • ISBN: 0399138900
  • Author: T. Carter,Ralph Emery
  • Genre: Photography
  • Subcategory: Music
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Putnam Adult; First Edition edition (September 1, 1993)
  • Pages: 288 pages
  • ePUB size: 1674 kb
  • FB2 size 1165 kb
  • Formats lrf mobi doc txt


Country music broadcasting legend Emery continues, again with coauthor Carter, the reminiscences he began with his bestselling Memories.

Country music broadcasting legend Emery continues, again with coauthor Carter, the reminiscences he began with his bestselling Memories. He displays a fine eye for detail and a command of his subject that is the product of 40 years on the Nashville scene, most recently as host of Nashville Now, a country music talk show on the Nashville Network (TNN).

With freelancer Carter ( Almost Like a Song ), Emery tells of being sustained by loving grandparents through a miserable childhood . We've always enjoyed his TV programs, and was interested in hearing more.

With freelancer Carter ( Almost Like a Song ), Emery tells of being sustained by loving grandparents through a miserable childhood dominated first by his alcoholic father and then by a stepfather with no interest in him; three failed marriages and drug addiction preceded his successful fourth marriage and current esteem.

One of the most exciting best-sellers in recent memory was Ralph Emery's Memories, the autobiography of the . Emery himself says his first book drew on less than one percent of his memories of his years on television

One of the most exciting best-sellers in recent memory was Ralph Emery's Memories, the autobiography of the popular host of TNN's Nashville Now. Across the country, fans made the book a phenomenal success, keeping it high on the New York Times best-seller list for six months. Emery himself says his first book drew on less than one percent of his memories of his years on television.

Packed with all-new tales of his years behind the mike and behind the. More great country music biz and early radio lore from Ralph Emery. Having read the first book, i wonder if he simply wrote enough for two and then split up the stories.

Anyone who remembers the old TNN show Nashville Now will find this book a must-read. It provides helpful insight into Ralph Emery's career, person, and show. You can catch clips of the show on youtube. The pics were wonderful and brought back memories of the show.

Items related to Memories the Autobiography of Ralph Emery. Ralph Emery; Tom Carter Memories the Autobiography of Ralph Emery. ISBN 13: 9780025354814. Memories the Autobiography of Ralph Emery. Ralph Emery; Tom Carter.

Emery and Carter prove lightning can strike in the same place twice: Witness this scintillating follow-up to their 1991 megabestseller, Memories. Emery and Carter prove lightning can strike in the same place twice: Witness this scintillating follow-up to their 1991 megabestseller, Memories. Emery (whose prime-time cable-TV show Nashville Now has 60 million viewers) reprises his humble beginnings in broadcasting at WTPR-a dusk-to-dawn 250-watter in Paris, Tennessee (pop.

Walter Ralph Emery (born March 10, 1933) is an American country music disc jockey and television host from Nashville . Emery later wrote several best-selling books chronicling his memories of the many Nashville singers and musicians that appeared on his various radio and TV shows.

Walter Ralph Emery (born March 10, 1933) is an American country music disc jockey and television host from Nashville, Tennessee. The second of Emery's three wives was Opry star Skeeter Davis.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Emery, Ralph; Carter, Tom, 1947-. Emery, Ralph, Entertainers, Country music. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

The country music legend continues his account of life in the world of entertainment and broadcasting, offering anecdotes about such performers as Dolly Parton, Johnny Cash, Garth Brooks, Billy Ray Cyrus, and many others.
Comments: (5)
Lilegha
I have read all of Ralph Emery books and they have given me a different way of looking at country music and the stars that make country music, I grew up with country music and it's a great hobby for me.
Ƀ⁞₳⁞Ð Ƀ⁞Ǿ⁞Ɏ
Anyone who remembers the old TNN show Nashville Now will find this book a must-read. It provides helpful insight into Ralph Emery's career, person, and show. You can catch clips of the show on youtube. The pics were wonderful and brought back memories of the show.
Sarin
Interesting book, repeats some stories from book 1.
Wizer
Written by the #1 deejay in America, this follow-up to MEMORIES is full of big names, not just in country music but government officials and bigwigs from California, like Gene Autry and Roy Rogers. The photo section is spectacular as the stars pictures were in their prime and full of their success, actually in thrawl of talking to a deejay when it should have been the other way around. Actually, he had the power to make or break a newcomer in the music business.

He talks about his early days in radio when he and others in his profession had personal contact with listeners to "the occasional point of real involvement." They were gentlemen back then and considered a part of the community, which they usually were, on par with the church minister. He called himself the face-less chatter to the working men and women of Franklin, a small town outside of Nashville where he met his destiny at WSM. In small towns, you can still call to request a song; on some stations in a town the size of Knoxville, some have a request time, as those did in my teenage years here. I guess some customs never get old, but the network deejays feel it is beneath their 'professionalism.' The truth is they tape their shows or are not in the position to insert a request, with some exceptions. It makes them the same as false prophets in a church, as their 'job' is to play what their listeners want to hear and not the personal choice of a corrupt traffic reporter who knows nothing about good music.

Earlier this year, Rodney Crowell (popular back in the 1960s) performed a free one-hour program in which he parodied his former father-in-law, Johnny Cash. I took a really good photo of him -- looking right at me! Proud to have fled the projects of Houston, Texas, to meet Rosanne Cash in L.A., he felt he had it made as a cocky kid. According to this book, he eventually wrote and produced some of the biggest songs ever recorded by John Cash. Good going, Rod Crowell. His upcoming performance at the Tennessee Theatre will not be free.

A local historian mused in one of his weekly columns about our largest movie place (of olden days) being called 'theatre' instead of theater. This book will tell him that Nashville had their own Tennessee Theater where NARAS staged the Grammy Awards only once and the prestige it brought to the Athens of the South. He gives all the details about Jim Reeves's fatal airplane crash: Reeves' memorial service was dotted with some of country music's biggest luminaries of the day, including Eddy Arnold, Chet Atkins, Red Foley (Pat Boone's father-in-law), Skeeter Davis (Emery's first wife), Floyd Cramer, Ferlin Husky, Webb Pierce, Justin Tubb, the Jordonaires and Don MacNeil of Chicago. The governor of Tennessee, Lamar Alexander, caused a stir when he sold the state's Lear Jet for $745,000 and replaced it with a gas-guzzler King Air; he mentions the fact that Alexander became the dumbest U. S. Secretary of Education.

There are big names from Box Car Willie to Justin Boot (a joke) listed in the Index, even Lincoln (concerning the Southern war shymn, "Dixie"). Others included in this volume include Billy Ray Cyrus, Roger Miller, Tammy Wynette and hubby George Richey, Patsy Cline (her songs just won't die as she did -- they linger on way past the time they tell, who'd think about walking after midnight these days?), Glen Campbell, the Oak Ridge Boys, and Alabama. Being a well-known celebrity in his own right, (I met him once out at the July 4th singing at Centenniel Park -- I hope he didn't think I was Ruth when I declined his offer of a kiss!) he can and does tell things as they were. No problem, just fun to remember how things (good and bad) were then.
Saithi
By Natalie - March 18, 2008
I have had little respect for Emery since I've heard and read about how rude he was to Gram Parsons in a interview in the 60's, which carried over to the way Gram Parsons was treated when he performed on The Grand Old Opry. It shows just how narrow and closeminded he could be toward a new talent trying to make it, who didn't meet his criteria. Like he is one to judge talent. Gram Parsons was a great talent, and his music still carries. He really didn't need a nod from Emery, of all people. By the way, Gram's Nubie suit hangs in the Country Music Hall Of Fame after all. He loved county music.
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