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eBook The Lost Supreme: The Life of Dreamgirl Florence Ballard epub

by Peter Benjaminson

eBook The Lost Supreme: The Life of Dreamgirl Florence Ballard epub
  • ISBN: 1556527055
  • Author: Peter Benjaminson
  • Genre: Photography
  • Subcategory: Music
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Chicago Review Press; First Edition edition (April 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 240 pages
  • ePUB size: 1206 kb
  • FB2 size 1588 kb
  • Formats doc lrf mobi lrf


In the months before she died, Florence Ballard, the . The Dreamgirls Resurrections. 177. Florence Ballard Primettes and Supremes Discography.

In the months before she died, Florence Ballard, the spunky teenager who founded the most successful female vocal group in history-the Supremes-told her own side of the story. A book-length portrait of the best singer in Motown's biggest group, delivered three decades after her death. Born in Detroit in 1943, Florence Ballard co-founded the Primettes in 1959 with Diana Ross. 181. Excerpts from Florence Ballards Legal Case Against Motown Records et al. 185.

In his wonderful The Lost most successful female vocal T group in history. hy her life The Mary Wilson, and Florence Ballard-two told deserves. In his talented hands, Flo earns the their life stories in bestselling books. Only lasting stardom she was deprived of in life. o Florence Ballard, the spunky teenager who s -Gerald Posner, author of t L ost founded the group, remained silent.

THIS BOOK IS based largely on the author’s exclusive audio-taped interview with Florence Ballard, which was conducted over several weeks in 1975.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. THIS BOOK IS based largely on the author’s exclusive audio-taped interview with Florence Ballard, which was conducted over several weeks in 1975. Unless otherwise noted, all quotes from Florence Ballard are from that interview. While every attempt was made to verify the accuracy of Flo’s statements, it should be noted that many of them express her personal opinions and feelings, which are by nature subjective and unverifiable.

Mobile version (beta). The Lost Supreme: The Life of Dreamgirl Florence Ballard. Download (pdf, . 2 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Author Peter Benjaminson.

The life of Florence Ballard (above left in a classic publicity shot) was a tale of both triumph and . Wilson wrote in her Dreamgirl autobiography about how impressed she was with Ballard’s voice in that contest. February 22, 2019 at 11:57 pm.

The life of Florence Ballard (above left in a classic publicity shot) was a tale of both triumph and tragedy, of a life filled all too briefly with adulation before it was cut short so sadly. The founding member of the Supremes, who sang on ten No. 1 singles with the unmatched Motown trio, died at the age of just 32 in her home town of Detroit on 22 February 1976. As we walked home, we discussed every possible detail of our performances, she recalled.

The Supremes were the most successful female vocal group in history. Only Florence Ballard, the spunky teenager who founded the group, remained silent. Of the three original members-Diana Ross, Mary Wilson, and Florence Ballardtwo told their life stories in bestselling books.

Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices

Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read The Lost Supreme: The Life of Dreamgirl Florence Ballard. Peter Benjaminson is the author of Death in the Afternoon: America's Newspaper Giants Struggle for Survival, Secret Police: Inside the New York City Department of Investigation, and The Story of Motown, and is the coauthor of Investigative Reporting. He is a former reporter for the Atlanta and the Detroit Free Press. He lives in New York City.

In his wonderful The Lost Supreme, Peter Benjaminson tells it masterfully, with all the drama and empathy her life deserves. I enjoyed reading Perter Benjaminson's book THE LOST SUPREME: THE LIFE OF DREAMGIRL FLORENCE BALLARD

In his wonderful The Lost Supreme, Peter Benjaminson tells it masterfully, with all the drama and empathy her life deserves. In Benjaminson’s talented hands, Flo Ballard earns the lasting stardom she was deprived of in life. Gerald Posner, author, Motown: Music, Money, Sex, and Power. I enjoyed reading Perter Benjaminson's book THE LOST SUPREME: THE LIFE OF DREAMGIRL FLORENCE BALLARD. It's an intriguing book that gives the reader a glimpse at the behind the scenes of one the world's most famous singing group and arguably the one that put Motown on the map. The book covers, briefly, the formation of the Supremes and the rise up the chart.

The Supremes were the most successful female vocal group in history. Of the three original members--Diana Ross, Mary Wilson, and Florence Ballard—two told their life stories in bestselling books. Only Florence Ballard, the spunky teenager who founded the group, remained silent. But, in the months before her 1976 death, Flo actually did tell her own side of the Supremes story—and the story of her entire life—to Peter Benjaminson, who recorded her words on tape.

 

In this book, for the first time, is Flo Ballard’s entire heartbreaking tale, revealing: the suprising identity of the man who raped her before she entered the music business; the details of her love-hate relationship with Motown Records czar Berry Gordy—and an account of their first and only date; her serious drinking problem and ignored pleas for treatment; her never-ending desire to sing lead and how she was prevented from doing so; her attempts to get her life back on track after being brutally expelled from the Supremes; and much more.

 

Flo Ballard traveled around the world in luxury, chatting with royalty and heads of state, applauded by millions. But when she died at the age of 32, she was a lonely mother of three just barely recovered from years of poverty and despair. Though we may mourn the extended silence of such a profound talent, at least now we can begin to understand how and why it happened.

Comments: (7)
Bludworm
When you look at the book's cover photo, you know why Supremes fans loved Flo. A talented composer could turn her short, tumultuous life into a tragic opera, since it was a life of music and she made a fast trip from the bottom to the top and back down. It is truly sad that Florence Ballard never got even a sentence of good advice in her life. Mary Wilson was in the same back row with Flo and survived because she made better choices. Flo's story is tragic in the classical sense of the word.

My only reservation is that Peter Benjaminson doesn't give Diana Ross any credit for the Supremes' phenomenal success. Whatever her personal failings might be, she was the one who sang lead and her "thin, nasal voice" has been popular with millions for over fifty years. All of the Supremes were talented, and we'll never know how they would have played if they'd shared lead vocals.

Let's hope that Mary Wells and Florence Ballard are up in heaven singing with the many other late Motown singers and getting a better deal than they got on earth. The book is an enjoyable read and all Supremes fans will enjoy learning about beautiful, talented Florence Ballard.
Tuliancel
This book told all the details of how this group came to be and how it stopped being a number one act. I didn't realize how Florence really got this whole thing going. It is an eye opener of the power of fame and money. I grew up with the Supremes and saw them perform live twice. I never knew or thought of Diane (Diana) as being anything but the lead Supreme. This book will open your eyes to what really happened to Florence, Mary, Diana, and the others who became Supremes. I wish it was a longer read!
Ka
This was a much awaited biography on original Supreme, Florence Ballard. The author had the advantage of eight hours of interviews with Ballard, and that is the strongest part of the book. The background history of Motown and the music industry serve to put the group and Ballard in context. I was disappointed that the author made little use of many other printed sources, especially from magazines and newspapers. By using the various printed sources with the interviews could have given a broader view of Ballard. Also, the interviews with people, who knew Ballard was of little use. I was hoping that her family could provide more insight into Ballard's childhood. They are unable, however, to provide much knowledge about the interrelationships within the group. The work is important as another piece of literature that does shed some light on Ballard especially from the quotes from the interviews. It is difficult to tease out a work on someone, who left few personal thoughts. The author, then, must use the works of others (several Motown artists have penned memoir, and most mentioned the Supremes and Ballard), as well as whatever newspaper accounts on that person. Of course, press releases must be handled carefully as Gordy attempted to keep anything negative about artists out of print. I disagree that this is a total waste because as long as the tapes are not made public, then this is the only access to some of the thoughts of Ballard, which were recorded. This work, though, is much better than the dissertation turned book by Randall Wilson.
Hulbine
The entertainment industry is not a pretty world, and very often not fair; and this is well illustrated in the tragic story of Florence Ballard, the founding member of the Supremes who was eventually cast out the famous group she helped create. This book shows how her talent was mismanaged by everyone, including herself, and how her life ended so tragically. At the same time, she was an integral part of the success of the original Supremes. The author was the last person to effectively interview Flo before her death, and this makes the book some-what autobiographical.
Wild Python
I enjoyed reading Perter Benjaminson's book THE LOST SUPREME: THE LIFE OF DREAMGIRL FLORENCE BALLARD. It's an intriguing book that gives the reader a glimpse at the behind the scenes of one the world's most famous singing group and arguably the one that put Motown on the map.

The book covers, briefly, the formation of the Supremes and the rise up the chart. It also covers the break up and downward spiral of ex-Supreme Flo Ballard. And although I found the book an interesting read, most of the information seems to be put together in piecemeal format. It jumps around a lot, and I understand that Benjaminson was using a tape recorded interview that he had conducted with Ballard back in 1975-76, when he worked for the "Detroit Free Press," as well as public records to put this book together.

I was expecting more details, especially of Ballard's life after the Supremes, along the lines of Mary Wilson's book Dreamgirl & Supreme Faith, Updated Edition: My Life as a Supreme but this book falls short. It does give some account of the sad life and struggle that Ballard had after Motown and The Supremes, so at least it sheds some light.

There were a couple of errors in the book that makes me say read everything with a grain of salt. One problem, that Supreme fans would catch, is the author implying that when the Supremes became "Diana Ross and the Supremes" they no longer cared about their appearance and performed "Love Child" on the Ed Sullivan show in their street clothes. Well, that's not true. The group was changing their image to a more urban look to fit in with the turbulent 60s and the changing times, hence the song.

Another small problem, the author makes the comparison between the Supremes and "Dreamgirls." He lists the show stopping number sung by the character "Effie," which is patterned after Ballard, as "I Tell You I'm Not Going." Anyone who knows anything about musical theater or has listened to this song, either from the Broadway musical or recent movie, knows the title is "And I Am Telling You I'm Not Going." Yes, this is nitpicking but you don't paraphrase a proper title. My guess is: Benjaminson ran to the theater and saw the movie once and mistakenly thought the title was as he wrote it.

Other than that, I found it a fun read. There are pictures in the book but nothing that I haven't seen before.
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