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eBook Typical Girls?: The Story of the Slits epub

by Zoe Street Howe

eBook Typical Girls?: The Story of the Slits epub
  • ISBN: 1847727808
  • Author: Zoe Street Howe
  • Genre: Photography
  • Subcategory: Music
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Omnibus Press (September 1, 2009)
  • Pages: 218 pages
  • ePUB size: 1316 kb
  • FB2 size 1401 kb
  • Formats azw doc txt lrf


Now, forty years on, author Zoë Street Howe speaks to The Slits themselves, to former manager Don Letts, mentor and PIL guitarist Phil . Too long seen as a note in the margin of the history of rock, The Slits at last get a fair hearing.

Now, forty years on, author Zoë Street Howe speaks to The Slits themselves, to former manager Don Letts, mentor and PIL guitarist Phil Levene, and many others who swirled within their cosmos to discover exactly how the Slits phenomenon erupted and to celebrate the legacy of a seminal band long overdue its rightful acclaim. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Author Zoe Street Howe speaks to The Slits themselves, to former manager Don Letts, mentor and PIL guitarist Phil Levene and many other friends and colleagues to discover exactly how The Slits phenomenon came about and to celebrate the legacy of a seminal band long overdue its rightful acclaim.

Like a silken unfolding, 'Typical Girls?' reframes The Slits, in terms of the cold blooded old times they transcended through brazen self determination.

Zoe Street Howe is a freelance writer and broadcaster contributing to publications including NME, Channel 4 music, Contemporary Magazine and BBC Music. She has previously assisted with press matters for artists such as The Blockheads, The Tiger Lillies and X Ray Spex. She also presents and co-produces the alternative music radio show Paranoimia, which broadcasts across Europe. Like a silken unfolding, 'Typical Girls?' reframes The Slits, in terms of the cold blooded old times they transcended through brazen self determination. Contemporary female composer/musicians stand firmly on their shoulders, whether they recognise it or not.

Now, forty years on, author Zoë Street Howe speaks to The Slits themselves, to former manager Don Letts, mentor and PIL guitarist Phil . To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Books related to Typical Girls? The Story of the Slits. Stevie Nicks: Visions, Dreams and Rumours.

Wild, defiant and startlingly inventive, The Slits were ahead of their time. Although they created some unique hybrids - dub reggae and pop punk, African rhythms, funk and free jazz - they were dismissed as being unable to play. Their lyrics were witty and perceptive while their influential first album challenged perceptions of punk and of girl bands - but they were still misunderstood. And that infamous debut album cover, with the band appearing topless and mud daubed, prompted further misreadings of the first ladies of punk.

A biography – Typical Girls? The Story of the Slits by Zoe Street Howe was published in the UK by Omnibus Press in July 2009. A full-length album entitled Trapped Animal was released in 2009, and the band continued to perform live

A biography – Typical Girls? The Story of the Slits by Zoe Street Howe was published in the UK by Omnibus Press in July 2009. A full-length album entitled Trapped Animal was released in 2009, and the band continued to perform live

Wild, defiant and startlingly inventive, The Slits were ahead of their time. Although they created some unique hybrids - dub reggae and pop-punk, African rhythms

Wild, defiant and startlingly inventive, The Slits were ahead of their time.

Typical girls stand by their man Typical girls are really swell Typical girls learn how to act shocked Typical girls don't rebel. x2) Who invented the typical girl? Who's bringing out the new improved model? And there's another marketing ploy Typical girl gets the typical boy. x(2) The typical boy gets the typical girl The typical girl gets the typical boy. Are emotional. Although they created some unique hybrids - dub reggae and pop-punk, African rhythms, funk and free jazz - they were dismissed as being unable to play. And that infamous debut album cover, with the band appearing topless and mud-daubed, prompted further misreadings of the first ladies of punk.

Wild, defiant and startlingly inventive, The Slits were ahead of their time. Although they created some unique hybrids - dub reggae and pop-punk, African rhythms, funk and free jazz - they were dismissed as being unable to play. This work shows how The Slits phenomenon came about.
Comments: (5)
ACOS
It's too bad that more people haven't heard the Slits. They are one of those bands that more people have heard of than actually heard.

For those who are fans of early first-wave British punk, you can't do much better than the early Peel Sessions and the reggae influence that surfaced on the "Cut" album and subsequent work make for a unique listen. It's not "white reggae" so much as it's a sound all their own.

I could blabber on about their importance as an influence to female musicians but I won't because the female musicians who were inspired by them make their own music and do a pretty good job of name-checking them on their own. It's just too bad there aren't more of them.

As for the book itself, I was impressed on how informative it was. It answered some questions I'd had since first discovering this group somewhere around 1993 at age 19 (about 12 years after they had broken up). Finding literature on them at that time was hard; finding the music was even harder.

I'm happy to say that you can easily find their music on CD now and that someone finally wrote a book on them. It's not a crappy book filled with unnamed sources and speculation, nor is it a dry and boring read. In addition, while I won't say this is a definitive book on punk itself (which it doesn't pretend to be), it does paint a very good picture of the atmosphere of the time.

If you liked John Lydon's "Rotten: No Irish, No Blacks, No Dogs" and Jon Savage's "England's Dreaming", you'd probably enjoy this book.
Togor
This is a thoughtful and well-written book, which seeks to explain what punk music really was (hint: it was not clothing or hairstyle), and where the Slits fit into the movement. Interviews with all the original members, and many of the Slits' peer group, make it a fascinating and comprehensive study of a fantastic and original band from a revolutionary time in music. My only real criticism is that is way too short, and there was less biographical information about the band members than I would have liked. But its highly recommended to anyone who was or is interested in punk, and more importantly, to everyone who wants to see the Slits finally get their due.
Mariwyn
Rounding up to 3 years from the untimely death of wunderkind Ari Up, I reread Zoe Howe's debut work, 'Typical Girls', to refamiliarise myself with the social significance of surviving anarcho-feminist punk project The Slits. It didn't disappoint.

Howe skilfully presents The Slits as musical innovators of the 2nd modernity and keenly chronicles the band's trajectory from bete noire to pioneering auteuse of hybridised musical genre. Once perceived as shambolic Clash groupies gone feral, The Slits would disrupt to survive multiple line ups, a cavalcade of mismanagement, all kinds of drug induced inertia and especially severely neotonous sexual profiling from 'rock & roll rulemakers' as well as from the public at large. Ms Howe spins a white knuckle ride of their enigmatic 20+ years adventure, as they dared to make glaring mistakes in the harsh public spotlight and triumphed before its incredulous gaze. Arthur Rimbaud's vision of womankind resonates in Howe's book, as the Slits overthrow gendrification, discover the unknown and generate its understanding - all via their vibrant musical pursuit.

Howe bookends the story with a timeline '76-'81 at the beginning and a discography at the finish. Treasured accounts abound from giants such as Don Letts, Vivien Goldman, Budgie (of Siouxie and the Banshees), Keith Levene, Dennis Bovell, Steve Beresford and others. There are fantastic glimpses into process, including Ari Up auditioning Budgie (in her knickers, like some kind of 'wild child') by gauging his reaction to her Tamla Motown collection. There's the making of 'Cut' and that muddy album cover, inspired by a freshly watered lawn at Ridge Farm. Budgie remembers late night rock-n-roll (not reggae) sessions, there - 'After Tonight' -with Dennis Bovell rockin out on a 6-string electric guitar.

Like a silken unfolding, 'Typical Girls?' reframes The Slits, in terms of the cold blooded old times they transcended through brazen self determination. Contemporary female composer/musicians stand firmly on their shoulders, whether they recognise it or not. Zoe Howe cleverly structures and narrates this book to demonstrate the profound importance of their work. She holds a blazing torch for their seminal influence and spirit, and illuminates their place in the musical pantheon. 'Typical Girls?' is a masterful work.
Lo◘Ve
Good to have such a readable and well-researched book about the Slits (at last). Bad that the book lacks an index. Very frustrating in fact, as so many people, groups, records, events and places are mentioned in the body of the text. The absence of any sort of index limits the book's value as a work of reference; so, a mere 4 stars out of 5.
Brick my own
Good first hand history of the London punk scene in the late '70s. If you are into Punk, then this is a MUST read.
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