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eBook Stopping Time: Paul Bley and the Transformation of Jazz epub

by David Lee,Paul Bley

eBook Stopping Time: Paul Bley and the Transformation of Jazz epub
  • ISBN: 1550651110
  • Author: David Lee,Paul Bley
  • Genre: Photography
  • Subcategory: Music
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Vehicule Press (1999)
  • Pages: 224 pages
  • ePUB size: 1759 kb
  • FB2 size 1506 kb
  • Formats lrf lit txt azw


The New York Times - February 13, 2000 He lives with his wife, artist Carol Goss, and their family in upstate New York

The New York Times - February 13, 2000. Mr. Bley has recently published a memoir in which he proves to be a perceptive critic as well as an engaging storyteller. - The New York Times, February 13, 2000. He lives with his wife, artist Carol Goss, and their family in upstate New York. As a jazz musician himself he has played with Kenny Wheeler, Julius Hemphill, Roscoe Mitchell, and was a founding member of the Bill Smith Ensemble.

Hyman Paul Bley, CM (November 10, 1932 – January 3, 2016) was a Canadian pianist known for his contributions to the free jazz movement of the 1960s as well as his innovations and influence on trio playing and his early live performance on the Moog a. .

Bley was a long-time resident of the United States. His music has been described by Ben Ratliff of the New York Times as "deeply original and aesthetically aggressive".

View it in the Music Periodicals Database.

I liked the book, and Bley touches on pretty much every area and period of a long and varied career, but I kept wishing he had gone into more detail throughout the book.

Pianist Paul Bley has a reputation for complexity and contrariness, which this all-too-short book will bear out, and perhaps to some degree explain. The book begins with another child in his neighborhood telling Bley the startling news that he was adopted (the whole truth is much more convoluted), and one can only wonder if he didn’t somehow compensate by dealing out shocking surprises throughout his later life.

Paul Bley was one of the subjects of Ron Mann's award-winning feature documentary "Imagine the Sound. David Lee received his MA in Music Criticism from McMaster University in 2004 and currently lives with his family in Hamilton, Ontario. Bibliographic information. Now in his sixties, Bley is touring more than ever, and recording with everyone from Kenny Wheeler to Charlie Haden. Stopping Time: Paul Bley and the Transformation of Jazz.

Paul Bley was barely into his twenties when he left Montreal for New York City, yet he had already played with Charlie Parker and subbed for Oscar Peterson at the Alberta Lounge. The piano prodigy had been leading his own bands in Montreal clubs since he was thirteen. Stopping Time is the story of a unique Canadian artist and his odyssey through the most turbulent years in modern jazz.

Paul Bley's autobiobraphy, entitled STOPPING TIME: Paul Bley and the Transformation of Jazz, was published in 1999 by Vehicule Press. In 1999 the National Library of Canada in Ottawa aquired the Paul Bley Archives

Paul Bley's autobiobraphy, entitled STOPPING TIME: Paul Bley and the Transformation of Jazz, was published in 1999 by Vehicule Press. In 1999 the National Library of Canada in Ottawa aquired the Paul Bley Archives. In 2003 TIME WILL TELL, Conversations witth Paul Bley by esteemed musicologist, Norman Meehan was published. Paul Bley: La Logica del Caso, by Arrigo Cappelletti, was published in Italian in 2004 and in English as Paul Bley: The Logic of Chance in 2010.

Paul Bley: Stopping Time by Chris Comer, published on July 21, 2007 at All About Jazz. Find more Podcast articles. Chris Comer talked to the influential and iconic free-jazz pianist Paul Bley upon the release of his first trio recording with Gary Peacock and Paul Motian in over 35 years, Not Two, Not One on ECM in April 2000. Since the 1950's Paul Bley's career has spanned many stylistic changes in jazz and Mr. Bley has a unique perspective on the ongoing history of jazz. In this lengthy interview Chris and Paul discuss the roots of free jazz, Bley's role in the timeline of jazz history and his collaborations with other well known jazz musicians.

This presents the story of a piano prodigy and his odyssey through the most turbulent years in modern jazz.
Comments: (5)
INvait
Almost anything from Bley is important in some way, and this short read was great. He was at the center of much of the music that inspired me back in the day, and he writes like he plays and like he speaks, too. There isn't a hesitation to say it and be done with it, and move on to the next zone. If improvised music is important to you,read this slim but vibrant volume. Then put on some solo Paul Bley music and smile.
Kiutondyl
Enjoyable read by one of my favorite jazz pianists. An insightful look into an exciting and eventful career.
Damdyagab
Although Paul Bley isn't given anywhere near the recognition he deserves in America, his influence on contemporary players is deep and profound, going from Chick Corea and Keith Jarrett through to nearly any younger jazz piano player today who is worthwhile. His lasting contribution is his demostration of what can be done with total freedom now that all the rules have been broken. You don't have to stay inside or outside with tonality or rhythm, being free means being able to go to either direction or any place in between.
This highly entertaining book tells his complete story from gigging in Canada to the present day. Some of the most compelling stories come from the exciting days of the October Revolution of 1964 and the formation of the the Jazz Composers Guild. There's also some great stuff on his involvement in the birth of performance synthesizers. But there's lots of great little stories including how Lucille Ball saved his life!
Dianalmeena
From the years 1968-1976, I was working, playing acoustic bass, under the name of Richard Youngstein. In Paul's very hip, very open book, he refers to playing a cool gig in Boston at the (long defunct) Jazz Workshop for one week with his long time drummer, Barry Altschul (whom I went to high school with in the Bronx) and "some bass player." Obviously Paul didn't remember my name, even though I recorded half an album with him on Polydor, called "The Paul Bley Synthesizer Show," produced by Orin Keepnews, and another album with his ex-wife, Annette Peacock, for French Polydor, that I heard had two titles, "Blood," and "Revenge." If anyone has a copy of either LP PLEASE let me know -I never got one & never heard it! Anyway, I also recorded under that name with Carla Bley & JCOA on "Escalator Over The Hill." I was very active in those years, playing w/Ros Rudd, Bill Dixon, Robin Kenyetta, Karl Berger, etc. I moved to LA late in 1976 and switched careers kind of, and names. I got my doctorate and license in psychology(like my late mentor, the great bassist David Izenzon)and have been in the healing field ever since. I had a trio/quartet "Erotic Zone," for some years and played periodically. Anyway, I am the same person, whether the old Richard Youngstein or the more recent Dr. Noah Young. Just thought I'd give a name to "some bass player" on the Jazz Workshop gig with mssrs. Bley and Altschul. And....Paul's book is awesome. Truly one of the giants of jazz and a priviledge to have made music with.(Write me at: [email protected])
JOGETIME
bley is as brilliantly understated in words as he is in music, and anyone familiar with his music or the many musicians he has played with (or anyone at all into jazz) will find a lot of stories in this book -- candid, funny, and illuminating. he never stays in one place for long, but always seems to end up somewhere interesting, which is why it's impossible to stop reading. not to mention the incredible photographs. the book may be too short by half, but you get the picture...
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