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eBook Play Me Something Quick and Devilish: Old-Time Fiddlers in Missouri epub

by Howard Wight Marshall

eBook Play Me Something Quick and Devilish: Old-Time Fiddlers in Missouri epub
  • ISBN: 0826219942
  • Author: Howard Wight Marshall
  • Genre: Photography
  • Subcategory: Music
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Missouri; First edition (January 14, 2013)
  • Pages: 424 pages
  • ePUB size: 1188 kb
  • FB2 size 1993 kb
  • Formats doc docx lit txt


Marshall’s latest book is Fiddler’s Dream: Old-Time, Swing, and Bluegrass Fiddling in Twentieth-Century Missouri, which continues the ethnography and discussion in Play Me Something Quick and Devilish. Marshall plays the music he studies and writes about.

Marshall’s latest book is Fiddler’s Dream: Old-Time, Swing, and Bluegrass Fiddling in Twentieth-Century Missouri, which continues the ethnography and discussion in Play Me Something Quick and Devilish.

Mark Twain and His Circle. Missouri Senate Campaign Committee. Political organisation. PagesMediaBooks and magazinesBookPlay Me Something Quick and Devilish: Old-Time Fiddlers in Missouri. English (UK) · Русский · Українська · Suomi · Español.

Start by marking "Play Me Something Quick and Devilish": Old-Time . Since I live in Missouri and enjoy bluegrass and old-time music this book was very interesting.

Start by marking "Play Me Something Quick and Devilish": Old-Time Fiddlers in Missouri as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Howard Wight Marshall considers the place of homemade music in people’s lives across social and ethnic communities from the late 1700s to the World War I years and into the early 1920s. This exceptionally important and complex period provided the foundations in history and settlemen Play Me Something Quick and Devilish explores the heritage of traditional fiddle music in Missouri.

Historians, music aficionados, and lay people interested in Missouri folk heritage-as well as fiddlers, of course-will find Play Me Something Quick and Devilish an entertaining and enlightening read.

Media Kit Play Me Something Quick and Devilish explores the heritage of traditional fiddle music in Missouri

Media Kit Play Me Something Quick and Devilish explores the heritage of traditional fiddle music in Missouri. Howard Wight Marshall considers the place of homemade music in people's lives across social and ethnic communities from the late 1700s to the World War I years and into the early 1920s. This exceptionally important and complex period provided the foundations in history and settlement for the evolution of today's old-time fiddling.

New List New Article New Book New Video New Post New Score new. Home Journals Folk Music Journal 2014 Vol. 10 No. 5. Play Me Something Quick and Devilish. Old-Time Fiddlers in Missouri (Marshall). Bradtke, E. (2014) Play Me Something Quick and Devilish: Old-Time Fiddlers in Missouri (Marshall). In: Folk Music Journal, Vol. 10, No. 5, pp. 660-661.

By Howard Wight Marshall. Columbia: Missouri University Press, 2012. Old-time styles are highly influenced by both oral and aural traditions, and various styles have developed in clearly defined regions within a state and across state lines

By Howard Wight Marshall. Pp. xvii + 400, list of transcriptions, note, selected bibliography, index to text, index to Voyager Records companion CD, compact disc of 39 tunes. Old-time styles are highly influenced by both oral and aural traditions, and various styles have developed in clearly defined regions within a state and across state lines. One of the most salient elements of "old-time" is that it's rooted in musical eras that existed prior to the development of radio and recorded sound. Consequently, it's regarded as a music that reflects smallscale community life and localized musical experience.

Play Me Something Quick and Devilish explores the heritage of traditional fiddle music in Missouri. Howard Wight Marshall considers the place of homemade music in people’s lives across social and ethnic communities from the late 1700s to the World War I years and into the early 1920s. This exceptionally important and complex period provided the foundations in history and settlement for the evolution of today’s old-time fiddling.

Beginning with the French villages on the Mississippi River, Marshall leads us chronologically through the settlement of the state and how these communities established our cultural heritage. Other core populations include the “Old Stock Americans” (primarily Scotch-Irish from Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, and Virginia), African Americans, German-speaking immigrants, people with American Indian ancestry (focusing on Cherokee families dating from the Trail of Tears in the 1830s), and Irish railroad workers in the post–Civil War period. These are the primary communities whose fiddle and dance traditions came together on the Missouri frontier to cultivate the bounty of old-time fiddling enjoyed today.

Marshall also investigates themes in the continuing evolution of fiddle traditions. These themes include the use of the violin in Westward migration, in the Civil War years, and in the railroad boom that changed history. Of course, musical tastes shift over time, and the rise of music literacy in the late Victorian period, as evidenced by the brass band movement and immigrant music teachers in small towns, affected fiddling. The contributions of music publishing as well as the surprising importance of ragtime and early jazz also had profound effects. Much of the old-time fiddlers’ repertory arises not from the inherited reels, jigs, and hornpipes from the British Isles, nor from the waltzes, schottisches, and polkas from the Continent, but from the prolific pens of Tin Pan Alley. Marshall also examines regional styles in Missouri fiddling and comments on the future of this time-honored, and changing, tradition. Documentary in nature, this social history draws on various academic disciplines and oral histories recorded in Marshall’s forty-some years of research and field experience. Historians, music aficionados, and lay people interested in Missouri folk heritage—as well as fiddlers, of course—will find Play Me Something Quick and Devilish an entertaining and enlightening read. With 39 tunes, the enclosed Voyager Records companion CD includes a historic sampler of Missouri fiddlers and styles from 1955 to 2012. A media kit is available here: press.umsystem.edu/pages/PlayMeSomethingQuickandDevilish.aspx
Comments: (7)
Oreavi
I was a bit concerned I maybe wasn't enough of a "fiddle music expert" to appreciate this book, that I might possibly find it a bit dry since I can barely list the names of half a dozen of the old-time fiddlers (I began my interest in Missouri fiddling starting with John Hartford, especially his album "Hamilton Ironworks", and Gene Goforth). I am only about 25% though the book but I am *delighted* with it. I wish to emphasize that the author writes with a very nice friendly tone (clear, but not "stuffy"). It's filling in a lot of blanks for me regarding how the US was discovered too. Obviously, the dynamics of music and the dynamics of people ("history"?), are inseparable. For instance, the book contains numerous interesting tidbits regarding the Lewis & Clark expedition: How these folks lived and what they did for recreation, how they shared music with native americans, etc. If you have already visited "Colonial Williamsburg" in Virginia (a destination I can recommend), I would say that this book is a an excellent continuation (of that period of time in American history)! I enjoy learning about history, sociology, etc. via the musical route...As you probably already know, by following music, you can learn a little about how people lived, what they were thinking about, societal norms, etc. And I think this is a MUCH more interesting approach than the way things are taught in school. : ) The book is also conveniently broken up into sections seldom more than several pages in length (which I like). I don't see how anyone can go wrong with this book unless they are really not very interested in the history of old-time fiddle music, geography, the evolution of music and people, or the evolution of technology. I think the price is quite reasonable too (observing that it came with a CD cinched my purchasing decision).
Cetnan
Dr. Marshall is one of those rare breed of historians that not only studies a subject, he is a participant in the field. So when he writes about a subject it is something he knows inside out and he does it with clarity, honesty and humor. The fiddle played a big role in the lives of people and the ethnic mix of Missouri brought it all together--as did many things in the westward expansion across America.
The CD of recordings over the last 50 years is also very interesting--you really 'hear' what you re reading about. This is a book for everyone that wants to know how music grew and who were the fiddlers that made it happen. Dr. Marshall brings the sounds alive. Hopefully there will be a follow up book on this great field of music.
Mightsinger
I play the mandolin and enjoy fiddle tunes. This book gives tunes that work well with the mandolin. I have learned so much from seeing how the Ozark fiddlers played there versions of songs. This has given me a greater sound when I apply their techniques to my mandolin.
Plus is is nice to have a concise volume of music for a specific region. Great book.
Jelar
"Play Me Something Quick and Devilish" by Howard Marshall, is a documentary with enjoyable tales about many of the Missouri fiddlers and gives excellent histories of the old fiddle tunes we all know and love. It is a very useful reference to have on hand. Also, enough history of the previous two-hundred years of Missouri is included to support the overall structure and organization of the book. The author's credentials include his own activities in collecting and documenting the Missouri fiddlers and the tunes they play, as well as a stint at the Smithsonian Institution in that subject area. Also, the author is a bona fide old time Missouri fiddler himself and as such personally knows or knew most of the musicians discussed. The book is an enjoyable and informative one to read and I would recommend it to all serious ole time fiddlers. Jerry W. Ellis
snowball
I love Marshall's books. I also have his latest which has just been published.
Gavigamand
good information but no tunes in it
Kanal
Excellent in every way! A real insight into Missouri fiddling. The author is able to make sense of the variety of fiddle traditions in a way that is interesting to the fiddle fan and the casual reader. CD is very helpful, and Sharon Graf has provided transcriptions of a number of tunes. I have been reading this slowly and savoring it all. Just disappointed that I only have one chapter left.

This book should be in every fiddler's library.
If your into Old Time music and are interested in Missouri fiddling this is a must have book. Loaded with a huge amount of information on people and tunes. BUY THIS BOOK
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