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eBook Generation Ecstasy: Into the World of Techno and Rave Culture epub

by Simon Reynolds

eBook Generation Ecstasy: Into the World of Techno and Rave Culture epub
  • ISBN: 0415923735
  • Author: Simon Reynolds
  • Genre: Photography
  • Subcategory: Music
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (July 18, 1999)
  • Pages: 480 pages
  • ePUB size: 1192 kb
  • FB2 size 1291 kb
  • Formats lit docx lrf mobi


Rave music includes techno and several other strains, all of them electronic. The bulk of the book consists of a long series of interweaved magazine articles that Reynolds published throughout the years

Rave music includes techno and several other strains, all of them electronic. Reynolds traces it from the German group Kraftwerk's "Krautrock" to disco and funk to the many rave-friendly formats extant today. Besides this music history, Reynolds discusses the panoply of rave-worthy drugs and proper rave attitude and deportment. The bulk of the book consists of a long series of interweaved magazine articles that Reynolds published throughout the years. He describes dance music subgenres, ubs, and how music changes.

Reynolds, Simon, 1963-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Archive of Contemporary Music. Music, Arts & Culture

Reynolds, Simon, 1963-. Music, Arts & Culture. org on September 23, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Generation Ecstasy book. An interesting insight into all aspects of rave culture of the 90's and accompanying events. In Generation Ecstasy, Simon Reynolds takes the reader on a guided tour of this phenomenon, telling the story of rave culture and techno music as an insider who has dosed up and blissed out. A celebration of rave's quest for the perfect beat definitive chronicle of rave culture and electronic dance music.

In Generation Ecstasy, Simon Reynolds takes the reader on a guided tour of this phenomenon, telling the story of rave culture and techno music as an insider who has dosed up and blissed out.

Energy Flash: A Journey Through Rave Music and Dance Culture is a book by English music journalist Simon Reynolds which chronicles the development of dance and rave music from the mid 1980s to the early 2000s. The book was published in America under the title Generation Ecstasy: Into the World of Techno and Rave Culture.

Generation Ecstasy is the story of rave culture and techno music. He is the author of Blissed Out: The Raptures of Rock (1990) and, with Joy Press, of The Sex Revolts: Gender, Rebellion and Rock 'n' Roll (1995). Challenging traditional ideas about music and spawning a global network of underground scenes based on the frenzied euphoria of the all-night dance party, rave is the most innovative, influential, and controversial pop phenomenon since punk rock.

When rave culture took over the world, the UK youth had to fight for their right to party. Section 63 of the 1994 Criminal Justice Act was the law that made raving impossible. The law forbid gatherings and police was raiding the suburbs and outskirts of the cities, stopping any activities they considered suspicious. On one of the occasions a helicopter and an enforced squad were sent to stop . irthday party in a house outside a city. 1994 protest to Section 63 of the Criminal Justice Act in UK. More than 5000 people went to the streets in London to defend their right to dance.

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If looking for the ebook Generation Ecstasy: Into the World of Techno and Rave Culture by Simon Reynolds in pdf form, in that case you come on to the faithful site. oceedings{onEI, title {Generation Ecstasy: Into the World of Techno and Rave Culture}, author {Simon Reynolds}, year {1998} }. Simon Reynolds.

In Generation Ecstasy, Simon Reynolds takes the reader on a guided tour of this end-of-the-millenium phenomenon, telling the story of rave culture and techno music as an insider who has dosed up and blissed out. A celebration of rave's quest for the perfect beat definitive chronicle of rave culture and electronic dance music.
Comments: (7)
salivan
Generation Ecstasy is probably the best book-length study of electronic music available right now. It is comprehensive and discusses just about every sub-genre of elctronic out there. Reynolds even makes a few categories to suit his own critical purposes. While certainly well worth the read, the book has serious flaws.
In an effort to disavow his own bourgeois status as music critic and conoisseur, Reynolds routinely sides with the more "populist" sub-genres out there. Jungle and gabba are good. Trip-hop and IDM are snobby. Hardcore and house get the thumbs up, 'intelligent drum and bass' and illbient get the thumbs down. While he often has a point, this siding with what 'moves the masses' turns too easily into apologetics for the culture industry (the mass manufacture and consumption of musical cliché). Under the misguided notion that if a certain class or ethnic group consumes a certain type of music it must be good stuff, Reynolds gets pulled into the knee-jerk dismissal of more "marginal" creativity. At certain points in his book I get weird echoes of Edmund Burke attacking the French Revolution and insisting on the necessity for incremental change within the hallowed lines of tradition. Whatever happened to radical criticism? Reynolds should know that "what sells" is not necessarily the destiny of a genre. The future of music is often (but admittedly not always) heard in its avant-garde. I think Reynolds' pseudo-populism goes hand in hand with his annoying habit of tracing electronic music back onto the grids of music he already understands. Witness just one of many: "If rave is heavy metal (rowdy, stupefying, a safety valve for adolescent aggression) and electronic is progressive rock (pseudo-spiritual, contemplative), Digital Hardcore is punk rock: angry, speedy, 'noise-annoys'-y." Analogies like this create a false sense of illumination and profundity. What has he really said by rave=metal, electronic=prog rock, hardcore=punk? The effect of such equations is to call us back to the familiar and to erase the historical specificity of electronic music. Rave is NOT just the repetition of metal with synthesizers, etc.
Take these caveats with a grain of salt--the book is still a great pleasure to read.
Amis
Excellent book for those interested in the origins of electronic dance music. Simon Reynolds, unlike many scholarly authors, writes in an engaging and personal way. He tells anecdotes from his own experiences in the dance music scene but also brings in an enormous amount of research and knowledge. There is so much good information in this book that it definitely deserves more than one reading.
Grokinos
This is so far the best book I've read on Electronic Dance Music, due to it's multiple perspectives (technological, historical, sociological, musical, cultural, chemical) on the phenomenon. I just think it deserves a proper and updated re-edition that and I hope Reynolds considers doing it!
Yndanol
Despite its limitations, this is still the best empirical book about the history of rave culture to date. Reynolds is an English dance music journalist who positions himself at the popular/danceable wing of the dance movement in contrast with its elitist/"intelligent" sections. (My sources in Ibiza/UK, though, tell me that he in fact belongs to London's clubbing elite...).

The bulk of the book consists of a long series of interweaved magazine articles that Reynolds published throughout the years. He describes dance music subgenres, artists/promoters/clubs, and how music changes. He also connects rave culture with the rise of harsh neoliberal capitalism in 1980s UK and US. However, Reynolds hyperventilates in excessive descriptions of sounds and theis effects in the communal experience of 'raving' that bonds the "generation ecstasy".

Despite the emphasis on musical descriptivism and on the British case, the book demonstrates how dance movement develops in general: in relation to the social tension between the underground and the mainstream, to the repressive action of the neoliberal state, and to the development of a global dance subculture: from the Second Summer of Love (1988) to what he aptly terms as "post-rave diaspora" (since 1997).

In the "post-rave diaspora", Reynolds notes that ecclectic experiments have gotten stuck in formal conventions of House, Techno and DnB, and that nobody knows where Techno movement will lead to. (As an example of this claim, see my review of album "Creamfield" by Paul Oakenfold).
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