» » Perfect Pitch: A Life Story

eBook Perfect Pitch: A Life Story epub

by Nicolas Slonimsky

eBook Perfect Pitch: A Life Story epub
  • ISBN: 0195062434
  • Author: Nicolas Slonimsky
  • Genre: Photography
  • Subcategory: Music
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (March 1, 1990)
  • Pages: 272 pages
  • ePUB size: 1838 kb
  • FB2 size 1671 kb
  • Formats mobi mbr azw rtf


Reprinted in 200 as Slonimsky's Book of Musical Anecdotes, Routledge. a b c Slonimsky, Nicolas (1988). Perfect Pitch: A Life Story. Nicolas Slonimsky, Author of Widely Used Reference Works on Music,Dies at 101".

Reprinted in 200 as Slonimsky's Book of Musical Anecdotes, Routledge. Republished in 2000 by W. W. Norton. London, England: Oxford University Press. p. 6. ^ "Nicolas Slonimsky Documentary- A Touch of Genius". Retrieved December 5, 2014.

Start by marking Perfect Pitch: A Life Story as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Slonimsky's 1988 autobiography, expanded in 2002 by his daughter Electra Yourke, tells the fascinating story of his life as. .

Slonimsky's 1988 autobiography, expanded in 2002 by his daughter Electra Yourke, tells the fascinating story of his life as pianist. For, despite the facts that Nicolas Slonimsky lived for more than 101 years (from 27 April 1894 to 25 December 1995), because of this longevity, my life overlapped his by some 55 years, and Slonimsky played a major role in a good part of the music I love (that of Charles Ives), he is a quite "new" discovery for me.

2 people like this topic. It's free and anyone can join.

Items related to Perfect Pitch: A Life Story. Nicolas Slonimsky Perfect Pitch: A Life Story

Items related to Perfect Pitch: A Life Story. Nicolas Slonimsky Perfect Pitch: A Life Story. ISBN 13: 9780193151550.

Perfect Pitch : A Life Story. by Nicolas Slonimsky. A man of untiring energy and humor, Nicolas Slonimsky has led a long and accomplished musical life, and he remains today, in his nineties, a vital presence in American music

Perfect Pitch : A Life Story. A man of untiring energy and humor, Nicolas Slonimsky has led a long and accomplished musical life, and he remains today, in his nineties, a vital presence in American music.

Schirmer Trade Books, 2002 - 318 páginas. Slonimskyâs 1988 autobiography, expanded in 2002 by his daughter Electra Yourke, tells the fascinating story of his life as pianist, composer, conductor and musical lexicographer. Comentarios de usuarios - Escribir una reseña. It is a book crowded with anecdotes, personal letters, and vignettes of his remarkable family and of the many famous men and women he has encountered.

Slonimsky also offers anecdotes about such modern figures as Henry Cowell, who ended up in jail on a morals charge .

Slonimsky also offers anecdotes about such modern figures as Henry Cowell, who ended up in jail on a morals charge; Joseph Schillinger, who became a musical guru for such as George Gershwin; Aaron Copland; and Charles Ives. His sense of fun is never far away, a reflection of his life (as evidenced by his confession of a hoax entry in his Music Since 1900, where he inserted an entry chronicling an 11-year-old composer named ""Sol Mysnik,"" which turns out to be an anagram of his last name).

A man of untiring energy and humor, Nicolas Slonimsky has led a long and accomplished musical life, and he remains today, in his nineties, a vital presence in American music. He has pursued four distinct careers: as a pianist, as a composer, as a pioneering conductor who introduced the works of such composers as Ives, Varese, and Cowell, and as a musical lexicographer who has achieved world-wide recognition, particularly as editor of the highly-respected Baker's Biographical Dictionary of Musicians, a reference work renowned for its highly imaginative, lively, and gem-like entries. In Perfect Pitch, his fast-paced and often hilarious autobiography, Slonimsky recounts in fascinating detail a life that spans the whole of twentieth-century music, ranging from his childhood in St. Petersburg, where he studied piano with his illustrious aunt, Isabelle Vengerova, to his years as secretary and "piano pounder" to Serge Koussevitzky, to his present career as musical lexicographer. He describes the extraordinary accomplishments of members of his family; Russia before, during, and after the Revolution; his successful appearances as conductor in Paris, Berlin, and New York, as well as his fall from grace at the Hollywood Bowl; the whimsical pleasures of lexicographical detective work; unexpected fame and fortune as a game show contestant; and much more. Along the way, the reader meets famous personalities as seen through Slonimsky's eyes, including Igor Stravinsky, Aaron Copland, George Gershwin, Sergei Prokofiev, Leonard Bernstein, John Cage, and Frank Zappa. Filled with illuminating anecdotes, Perfect Pitch captures through wit, spice, and irreverence an extraordinary life.
Comments: (3)
Iarim
This book is a master piece:a book of bookd.Everybody should read it.The service was good
Dagdarad
This grease screen actually works. It seems well-made and, yes indeed, cuts down on the grease splatters on the stove top. Arrived very quickly.

Very happy about the relatively hefty weight and size of the screen, small mesh size that keeps grease in and lets steam out, plus the convenience of the "feet." I tried a $5 screen from a big discount department store years ago, and it was such a piece of junk that I tossed it. This one beats it by far! Well worth the extra dollars.

My only complaint: Seemed to be packaged very well, but arrived with minor irregularities in the screen.

Overall, it's an overlooked but necessary kitchen tool if you're not a TV chef with people cleaning up after you off-camera! Frying Southern-style chicken and cooking sausage for an Oktoberfest pie is fun when it's such an easy cleanup!
Painwind
I might well have called this "While I Slept" (with apologies to Art Buchwald). For, despite the facts that [a] Nicolas Slonimsky lived for more than 101 years (from 27 April 1894 to 25 December 1995), [b] because of this longevity, my life overlapped his by some 55 years, and [c] Slonimsky played a major role in a good part of the music I love (that of Charles Ives), he is a quite "new" discovery for me.

Born a Jew in St. Petersburg but baptized in the Orthodox church, Slonimsky was just one of many overachievers in his family. (As one example, his maternal aunt, Isabelle Vengerova, who - like him - was to emigrate to the United States, taught piano not only to Slonimsky but to Dmitri Tiomkin, the famous Hollywood composer, while both were still in Russia, and then to the likes of Samuel Barber, Leonard Bernstein, Aaron Copland, Lukas Foss and Gary Graffman, when she lived in New York and served for many years on the faculty of the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia.)

The 1917 Revolution led to Slonimsky's 1918 emigration from the Soviet Union, but not before he became known to a number of St. Petersburg composers and musicians of fame, not the least of whom was Alexander Glazunov, the director of the music conservatory there. His migratoy path while wending his way eventually to the U.S. is a story all in itself, with "pit stops" in Kiev, Karkhov, Yalta, Constantinople, Sofia, and, eventually, Paris, where he met Koussevitsky, Stravinsky and Prokofiev, assisting all three of them in various (and humorous) ways.

Arriving first in the U.S. at Rochester (NY), where he had been invited to coach the newly-instituted American Opera Company at the Eastman School of Music, Slonimsky had his initial conducting experiences (not a total success, but one which nonetheless demonstrated that he had a unique ability to "decouple" his two arms, permitting him to conduct in two different meters at the same time [something that would stand him in good stead when he later conducted the music of Ives]). From there, he went to Boston, as Koussevitsky's assistant (also not without its humor). It was in Boston that he met his wife-to-be, Dorothy Adlow (another Russian Jewish immigrant who became famous in her own right as the only Jewish editor on the staff of the Christian Science Monitor), and formed his own small chamber orchestra - made up largely of musicians from the Boston Symphony - for the performance of "new, modern" music. It was here, in 1928, that he first met Henry Cowell, which was to factor importantly in his early championing of Charles Ives and his music.

Skipping (temporarily) the Ives - Slonimsky connection, in 1933 Slonimsky was invited to be the conductor of the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra, an assignment that ended in disaster when he programmed too much modern music for the tastes of the audience, not the least of which was Edgar Varèse's "Ionisation."

Later in life - in fact, largely for the balance of what was to turn out to be an exceedingly long and rich life - Slonimsky turned his attention and activities toward writing on musical matters, mostly as a musical biographer and lexicographer for various music encyclopedias such as Theodore Baker's "Biographical Dictionary of Musicians." His bulldog determination for "accuracy at whatever cost" knew no bounds, even going so far as to check historical newspaper accounts of the weather on the date of Mozart's funeral, to put the lie to claims that friends did not attend Mozart's funeral because of snow: the snow, not the funeral, was in fact canceled.

Among Slonimsky's other writings were treatises on music theory, including some rather abstruse writings on the theory of harmony that represented true inventions on his part. In one of the strangest juxtapositions - and truly one of the most hilarious chapters of the book - Slonimsky crossed paths, in 1981, with none other than Frank Zappa, who took a personal interest in Slonimsky's theories and actually applied portions of them to his compositions.

But it was the Ives connection which brought my attention to Slonimsky in the first place, on account of the anecdotes that Jan Swafford, in his "Charles Ives: A Life With Music," related regarding Slonimsky's early championing of Ives's music, decades before others (incuding Bernstein) did. In what for me is the "gravitational center" of the book, a chapter entitled "Three Places in New England," Slonimsky, with the greatest of warmth and a wealth of detail, describes his initial meeting of Ives (through the auspices of Cowell) and his concertizing in both the U.S. and Europe, including Ives works on the programs. Certainly a highlight largely lost to history was Slonimsky conducting the Berlin Philharmonic, on 5 March 1932, in a program of works by Ives, Ruggles and Varèse, to both critical and popular acclaim, as well as enthusiastic acceptance by the Berlin orchestra musicians for whom this music would have been impossibly difficult had it not been for Slonimsky's conducting expertise. Ives and Slonimsky were to remain lifelong friends, and Ives, despite his infirmaties later in life, and often with the greatest of physical difficulties, would correspond with Slonimsky. One can only wish that some recording or another of a Slonimsky performance of an Ives work would have survived, but apparently - and regrettably - this is an idle wish.

There is a sequel - of sorts - to this autobiography, called (with Slonimksy's tongue placed firmly in his cheek) "The First Hundred Years." Not an update that adds another five years to "Perfect Pitch," this one is a compendium of excerpts of some of his best writings (including excerpts from "Perfect Pitch"). There is no better way to gauge the length, breadth and depth of Slonimsky's interests and expertise on matters musical than this "sequel." But do read "Perfect Pitch" first. If you can stop laughing long enough to complete it.

Bob Zeidler
eBooks Related to Perfect Pitch: A Life Story
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020