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eBook The Photographer's Vision: Understanding and Appreciating Great Photography epub

by Michael Freeman

eBook The Photographer's Vision: Understanding and Appreciating Great Photography epub
  • ISBN: 0240815181
  • Author: Michael Freeman
  • Genre: Photography
  • Subcategory: Photography & Video
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Focal Press; 1 edition (September 29, 2011)
  • Pages: 192 pages
  • ePUB size: 1374 kb
  • FB2 size 1191 kb
  • Formats lrf lit txt lrf


In The Photographer's Eye, Michael Freeman showed what a photographer needs to do in the instant before the shutter is released.

In The Photographer's Eye, Michael Freeman showed what a photographer needs to do in the instant before the shutter is released. In the sequel, The Photographer's Mind, he explained the way that professional photographers think a picture through before taking it. Both of these international best-sellers featured Michael's own photography: stunning landscapes, revealing portraits, and fascinating street photography

Acclaimed international photographer and writer Michael Freeman takes the reader on a wonderful journey to understand and appreciate a great photograph.

Acclaimed international photographer and writer Michael Freeman takes the reader on a wonderful journey to understand and appreciate a great photograph. The Photographer's Vision features some of the world's greatest photographers past and present and examines what it takes to create award-winning imagery. Each genre of photography - whether photojournalism, fashion or fine art - requires a developed skill set influenced by an underlying passion and vision

In The Photographer's Eye, Michael Freeman showed what a photographer needs to do in the instant before the shutter is released. Both of these international best-sellers featured Michael's own photography: stunning landscapes, revealing portraits, and fascinating street photography.

The Photographer's Vision book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Photographer's Vision: Understanding and Appreciating Great Photography as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Photographer's Vision: Understanding and Appreciating Great Photography.

In The Photographer's Eye, Michael Freeman showed.

Электронная книга "The Photographers Eye: A graphic Guide: Instantly Understand Composition & Design for Better Photography", Michael Freeman. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Photographers Eye: A graphic Guide: Instantly Understand Composition & Design for Better Photography" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

In The Photographers Eye, Michael Freeman showed what a photographer needs to do in the instant before the shutter .

In The Photographers Eye, Michael Freeman showed what a photographer needs to do in the instant before the shutter is released. In the sequel, The Photographers Mind, he explained the way that professional photographers think a picture through before taking it. Both of these international best-sellers featured Michaels own photography: stunning landscapes, revealing portraits, and fascinating street photography. Now, in The Photographers Vision, he examines the work of photographys greats, explaining how to look at a photo and how to learn from looking at it.

Book Details Both of these international best-sellers featured Michael's ow. .

Full Title:The Photographer's Vision: Understanding and Appreciating Great Photography: Understanding and Appreciating Great Photography. ISBN-13:978-0240815183. In The Photographer's Eye, Michael Freeman showed what a photographer needs to do in the instant before the shutter is released.

DIn The Photographers Eye, Michael Freeman showed what a photographer needs to do in the .

DIn The Photographers Eye, Michael Freeman showed what a photographer needs to do in the instant before the shutter is released.

In The Photographer's Eye, Michael Freeman showed what a photographer needs to do in the instant before the shutter is released. In the sequel, The Photographer's Mind, he explained the way that professional photographers think a picture through before taking it. Both of these international best-sellers featured Michael's own photography: stunning landscapes, revealing portraits, and fascinating street photography.Now, in The Photographer's Vision, he examines the work of photography's greats, explaining how to look at a photo - and how to learn from looking at it.

Comments: (7)
Akta
If you've liked Freeman's previous works, you'll like this one too. One of the things I like most about his books is his writing style, which is very professional yet also accessible. He does give his opinion from time to time, but he is very fair in presenting a wide range of views.

In case you are wondering what the book covers, it is broken into three main sections:
1) A Momentary Art: goes into such abstract topics as "What a Photograph Is ... and isn't" and "Does the Audience Matter?"
2) Understanding Purpose: goes into genre (e.g., landscape and portraiture), resulting product (e.g., single print vs. photo essay), and concepts (ranging from modernism to deception)
3) Photographer's Skills: goes into the element of surprise, technical skills, composition, and color vs. B&W.

Without meaning to be negative, the book felt like more of a collection of essays than a single book. This didn't really bother me, however, because I learned a lot, and it was all at least loosely related.

I should also point out that most of the photographs selected for this book are quite excellent -- both on their own and in terms of educational value. Moreover, every now and then he discusses a photo's background in depth -- with great success: it is not only interesting, but also educational.

Finally, no one should think that this book will help them improve their photographic skills. It is by no means a "how to" book. Even in the third part of the book, it discusses skills rather than help develop them. This is about understanding photography, not producing it -- as the title clearly states.
Zainian
This is one of the few books on how to see, understand, appreciate, and evaluate, a photograph or photographs written by a practicing photographer, who, most unusually for visual artists, is articulate in a concrete manner. Deeply knowledgeable of the entirety of the arts scene, Freeman has given us not only the third volume in his expanding franchise of "The Photographer's ___" series, but what may become a classic among books on this type of subject. It is certainly a wonderful candidate as a text for any university course on art appreciation.

At the zero-dimensional level, it is easily the most and best illustrated of any such book, and has a wonderful eye appeal. Most such books are full of text with few, if any illustrations. I tend to have little patience with books on art that are mostly words, particularly when the words do little to move the reader toward the supposed goal of knowing more about the art under consideration. Arnheim and Gombrich are good for theory, but tedious to plow through, and Susan Sontag? Well, I'll just say that I never managed to get through hers; she does have some quotable one-liners.

This book took a lot of work. Unlike Freeman's other books, only a very few of the illustrations in PV are his. He has mined the historical archives and dozens of the most current practitioners' work for over a hundred images, almost all with a well thought out caption. Setting this book apart from any other by a European or American is the number of images from East Asian photographers of the first caliber. Freeman has done a number of book and article projects in China and throughout Southeast Asia over many years and is more aware of talent there than we in the US are likely to be. This aspect alone makes this a book to which one should pay attention.

It took me a while to read this book. I went at it one or a few sections at a time. And it grew on me.

The first part, "A Momentary Art," looks at what a photograph is and isn't and what sets photography apart from other visual arts. He argues a model for understanding what makes a great photographic image. The second part, "Understanding Purpose," starts out with a review of a pretty standard breakout of the genres of photography, all based on content. Next he examines the various end use formats for one or a set of photographs. Not much new here. However, how he will develop his argument throughout the book starts to become apparent at several levels. Firstly, he continually links where he is to the opportunities emergent with today's digital tools and the larger possibilities these tools admit to the capture vs. concept dichotomy that runs through the philosophical and critical discourse today. Secondly, even in discussions on standard topics, he hints at where photography is going. Thirdly, he works the differing perspectives and expectations of practitioners, their audiences, critics and other vested interests into all aspects of his argument. That may be characterized as, "I like to think of photography as all one."

With that in mind, the reader will follow Freeman through a thorough look at appreciating, understanding, and evaluating an image or set of images from the viewer's, photographer's, and presenter's views of the "creative purpose" behind the images. Freeman moves around and among all sides of the debates that often resemble mumbojumbo and hand waving more than substantive statement in others' hands. The spectrum runs from classical "capture" to a major thrust in today's fine art photography hiding behind the cloak of "concept." "Concept" is the longest subsection in this part on "purpose." No longer "previsualization," concept today requires for a viewer's understanding a written or verbal discourse on the photographer's intent, message, personal philosophy, and so on. Of course, the Achilles heel of concept photography is what to do with the image in the absence of all of the words: this is of a different degree from the debate around images and captions from the picture magazine era. This reviewer's humble opinion is that "concept" covers for a lot of boring, uninspired, but often mural-sized pictures being flogged as fine art. But it is still useful to understand that....

At the bottom line, I favor, "It's the image, stupid!" But Freeman argues convincingly that the more one knows, let's say, of Jeff Wall's background and attempt at a personal philosophy, the more likely one might enjoy and appreciate his work. Sometimes, it just takes real effort.

The third and concluding section returns to the stuff of "The Photographer's Eye," and "_ Mind," though at a much more sophisticated level. Freeman summarizes the skill set a photographer must master to emerge successfully in today's hyper-competitive, rapidly desensitized market. He then places compositional considerations driven by the subject, what works, color, and lighting into the fuller world of display, purpose, and leaking across boundaries into fine art and art-crit discourse. It is clear that some influential critic/curators have stymied the opening up of thinking about photography since the 1970s and continue to distort the market today.

So enjoy this book. Any reader will come away enlightened, and, very likely, more open minded. With this book, Freeman is, I hope, signaling that other titles are forthcoming. This book expands beyond the photographer-centric viewpoint of PE and PM to encompass all of the actors in the photographic universe. He is close to having written the most significant body of work on a visual art form in many a year, and certainly a terrific one on which to start enjoying a new century of art.
Marilore
Michael Freeman is clearly the premier photographic composition authors of our time. His books delve deep into the art and the science of photographic composition. This book, the 3rd in a series of 3, expands on the subject of content and awareness in the art of photography. In this book he introduces us to a large variety of photographs from a wide spectrum of genre, from classic landscape to deadpan to portraiture photography.

I have given this book a 4 out of 5 stars not because the book is flawed, rather because this book is not really a "stand alone" book and unless you're familiar with Freeman's earlier books you will not gain the full insight the author has to offer. In "The Photographers Eye" and "The Photographers Mind", Freeman dives deeper into the art of composition and lays a firm foundation of understanding that allows you to make the most of his this newer book. That is not to say this book is incomprehensible to those without a solid background in composition theory, rather that a firm understanding will allow you to more fully grasp the technique and the beauty Freeman discusses.

Freeman's writing style is very conversational and easy to understand. Moreover, you get a strong sense of the authors passion for photography that is as contagious as it is inspiring. I would very much like to sit down and have a beer with Freeman and I'm sure the stories he could tell would be well worth the cost of a pint or three! That said, Michael, if you're reading this and ever find yourself in San Diego, feel free to look me up... my treat!
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