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eBook Lost Photographs of Captain Scott epub

by D. M. Wilson

eBook Lost Photographs of Captain Scott epub
  • ISBN: 1408703009
  • Author: D. M. Wilson
  • Genre: Photography
  • Subcategory: Photography & Video
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Little Brown and Company; First Edition edition (October 1, 2011)
  • ePUB size: 1827 kb
  • FB2 size 1809 kb
  • Formats lit mbr doc azw


In pictures: Fought over, neglected and then lost for more than half a century, Captain Scott's own photographs of the fatal Antarctic .

Wed 5 Oct 2011 1. 9 EDT First published on Wed 5 Oct 2011 1. 9 EDT. Portrait of Captain LEG Oates, October 1911. Nevertheless, their performance exceeded expectations, in large part due to his care. Scott made two portraits of Oates, but only achieved the correct exposure in this one. Photograph: Little, Brown Book Group.

David M. Wilson is the great-nephew of the Chief of the Scientific Staff, Dr. Edward Wilson, who died with Captain Scott and his fellow explorers. Customers who bought this item also bought. Page 1 of 1 Start overPage 1 of 1.

This time around, he brought along professional photographer Herbert Ponting to stay at the base camp and teach Scott, and several others, how to take and develop photographs in the harsh Antarctic environment so that the group could document their scientific endeavors. This beautiful book compiles photos of Scott's ill-fated journey to the South Pole in 1912.

Captain Scott perished with four of his fellow explorers on their return from the South Pole in March 1912. Almost immediately the myth was founded, based on Scott's diaries, turning him into an icon of courage in the face of impossible circumstances. But during the final months of that journey Scott also took a series of breathtaking photographs: panoramas of the continent, superb depictions of mountains and formations of ice and snow, and photographs of the explorers on the polar trail.

Captain Scott perished with four of his fellow explorers on their return from the South Pole in March 1912. But these photos have never been seen - initially fought over, neglected, then lost.

Publisher: Little, Brown and Company. Captain Scott perished with four of his fellow explorers on their return from the South Pole in March 1912. But during the final months of that journey Scott also took a series of breathtaking photographs: panoramas of the continent, superb depictions of mountains and formations of ice and snow, and photographs of the explorers on the polar trail

Captain Scott perished with four of his fellow explorers on their return from the South . Books related to The Lost Photographs Of Captain Scott.

Captain Scott perished with four of his fellow explorers on their return from the South Pole in March 1912. Almost immediately the myth was founded, based on Scott's diaries, turning him into an icon of courage in the face of impossible circumstances
Comments: (7)
Doukree
It was recently that I discovered the tragic story of Sir Captain Robert Falcon Scott and his brave companions. I came across the story by chance. I was intrigued by it. I wanted to know more about the sacrifices and hardship these gallant gentlemen faced in one of the world's most harshest places. I started to read more about them. But this book was the first published book that I purchased that told their story, in photographs that were thought to have been lost many years ago.

This book was a really rewarding read. It didn't read like a traditional narrative, given the fact that this book is also a picture book. The author David M. Wilson goes into enough detail behind each picture and also the origins of the Terra Nova Expedition without sounding like a drab college professor, even though at times he does use a "classification method" in his storytelling to tell where each picture's origins come from. However, this remains necessary in order to fully understand the story these pictures tell. Looking through the eyes of Scott and his photographic mentor, Herbert Ponting, you are taken back to the years 1911-1912, during the time when these men embarked on a journey of discovery and exploration. To see these photos in these pages makes you see through the eyes of these heroic men.

The fact that five of the men who were the final team to go the South Pole never came back is a very tragic one, albeit the fact that these heroes, after death, achieved infamy, for their courage, for their pursuit of the sciences, and for their country. If you are looking for a good book to start researching the Terra Nova Expedition, I suggest starting with this book and admiring these photos that, thanks to the author and his team behind the book, will live on in history forever.
Dont_Wory
If you are someone interested, as I am, in the heroic age of Polar exploration, this book is for you. The photos are huge and beautifully reproduced. If you have read Scott's journal or Huntford's book or Crane's or Cherry-Garrard's, you have formed an image in your mind of what it must have looked like to be at Hut Point or starting the trek up the Beardmore Glacier or pulling a heavily-laden sledge. This wonderful book gives you exactly what it looked like: the pony camp, the tents, the sledges, the mountain ranges, One Ton Depot--yes, there are three or four photos that Scott took of One Ton Depot, which he later died only a few miles away from.

You need not delve into the controversy concerning Scott's leadership; just immerse yourself in the immense whiteness that those intrepid men entered into of their own free will, and be amazed that ANY of them lived through it. Short of going there yourself, there is nothing like this book.

The photos are supplemented by numerous excellent, detailed maps, better than I have seen in any other book, that give the reader a very good idea of where the photos were taken. The accompanying text is generally helpful, though it begins and ends with a strange attempt to impose a supernatural "camera as Jonah" silliness on the photos that I found very distracting.

Other than the words of the explorers themselves, this is the most valuable book I have seen about Scott's last expedition. Wow.
HappyLove
I have been fascinated by the Antarctic since a little boy and Scott and his four comrades is still regarded as the epitome of British endeavour. This book only assists in this manner.
luisRED
This beautifully complements Scott's diaries ("The Last Expedition")not only through the photographs themselves, but by the details and maps in Wilson's narrative. Scott has been cruely used and maligned-first by the establishment who used his death to inspire similar acts of sacrifice for the country in the first world war, and then maliciously slandered by Roland Hartford who attempted to portray Scott as an ignorant buffoon whose ineptitude led to his own and his companions deaths. Both are wrong and have served only to airbrush from history how important a scientific exploration Scott's was,and how first rate he was as an explorer. Wilson puts both of these abuses of Scott's legacy in the graves they deserve and reveals Scott the man and naturalist explorer. That Scott endured freak weather conditions (known now to occur very rarely;Hartford and co all ignore this and the fact that in 1910-12,very little was known at all about Antarctica;Scott studied and used all the known data from Cook to Ross to Shackleton's early south pole expedition;none foresaw temperatures of -40f for over a month plus associated blizzards.It was known as a safe period,with temperatures of -4f to -20f.That Amundsen had all the luck Scott didn't is hardly a reason to damn him, and by common consent,Amundsen's expedition was worthless;no scientific data was collated-even his route wasn't mapped!.As Scott said,it was simply bad luck and down to providence)and was used by people for their own ends (war propaganda or-in Hartfords case, easy money by slandering the dead) really shouldn't rubbish Scott as a great man.
The poignancy of these photographs that are of a doomed set of people easily equals the poignancy of Scott's diaries.
Niwield
This provides a very interesting additional perspective on Scott's Terra Nova Expedition. Although it is quite a large format, the publishers have seen fit to print some pictures so large that they require two pages. Whilst I understand the desire to provide greater magnification, I wish that they'd left these images whole and uninterrupted on a single page. Still, worth owning.
Chilele
I bought this book as a Christmas present for my husband who enjoyed it immensely. It has now become a "coffee table" book and everyone who has seen it has enjoyed it. The pictures are great as is the accompanying printed matter. Anyone who knows this story will find the book entrancing and those who don't know it will find it equally fascinating. Wonderful, wonderful pictures.
Vetibert
Captain Scott amazing photos
The quality of the photos is incredibly
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