» » Broken Empire : After the Fall of the USSR

eBook Broken Empire : After the Fall of the USSR epub

by Fen Montaigne,Gerd Ludwig

eBook Broken Empire : After the Fall of the USSR epub
  • ISBN: 0792264320
  • Author: Fen Montaigne,Gerd Ludwig
  • Genre: Photography
  • Subcategory: Photography & Video
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: National Geographic (November 1, 2001)
  • Pages: 224 pages
  • ePUB size: 1534 kb
  • FB2 size 1535 kb
  • Formats lrf mobi azw doc


Gerd Ludwig photography is first-class but I wish written text had been as creative as the photographer's ey.

But Fen, must you be so boring and bland. A single image captured a thousand words and your text was a dreadful mono-tone grounded in a yawning choice of vocabulary. Broken Empire puts the lie to the "Workers Paradise" promised by the USSR's once all-powerful communist regime, revealing the harsh realities of environmental and spiritual decay left in its wake. The images are dazzling and heartbreaking. A must see and read book for anyone who loves truth.

Christmas 2001 is the tenth anniversary of the demise of the Soviet Union

On December 25, 1991, at 7:35 .  . Christmas 2001 is the tenth anniversary of the demise of the Soviet Union. To commemorate the event, National Geographic presents a mesmerizing retrospective that captures all the turbulence of Russia' s new beginning. With 120 extraordinary photographs by Gerd Ludwig and incisive essays by Fen Montaigne, "Broken Empire captures Russia in all its complexity.

Ten volatile years after the fall of the Soviet Union, an award- winning photographer teams up with a.With 120 extraordinary photographs by Gerd Ludwig and incisive essays by Fen Montaigne, Broken Empire captures Russia in all its complexity.

Ten volatile years after the fall of the Soviet Union, an award- winning photographer teams up with a world-renowned journalist to complete an unforgettable visual and textual record of Russia's ambivalent rebirth. On December 25, 1991, at 7:35 . soldiers lowered the red Soviet flag flying over the Kremlin and raised the Russian tri-color in its place. The moment passed without pomp 0r circumstance, resulting in a strangely muted end t0 a regime that had, in many ways, defined the 20th century.

Gerd Ludwig and Fen Montaigne each know Russia as well as any Westerner can. Ludwig, a concerned, perceptive photojournalist, has been fascinated by this vast and varied land since he was a young boy growing up in Germany; Montaigne first felt its powerful pull as Moscow. Ludwig, a concerned, perceptive photojournalist, has been fascinated by this vast and varied land since he was a young boy growing up in Germany; Montaigne first felt its powerful pull as Moscow correspondent for the Philadelphia Inquirer in the communist era and was an eyewitness to many of the pivotal events in the fall of the .

The essays are by Fen Montaigne, who, as Moscow correspondent for The Philadelphia Inquirer, witnessed the end of the . Through the eyes of ordinary Russians, Ludwig and Montaigne will portray these various facets of Russia today.

The essays are by Fen Montaigne, who, as Moscow correspondent for The Philadelphia Inquirer, witnessed the end of the USSR and has since returned regularly to Russia for National Geographic magazine. In photographs and words, Ludwig and Montaigne will look not only at the wrenching changes that have swept Russia in the past 10 years, but also at the direction Russian society is heading in the future. The media has paid much attention to the chaos, corruption and hardship that have accompanied the birth of the new Russia.

Ludwig clearly has an intimate feel for the soul of this great world.

book by Fen Montaigne. Ludwig clearly has an intimate feel for the soul of this great world. Broken Empire, Broken Dreams. com User, December 30, 2001.

Fen Montaigne, Gerd Ludwig. soldiers lowered the red Soviet flag flying over the Kremlin and raised the new blue, white and red Russian tri-color in its place. The ceremony occurred with no fanfare, witnessed only by a few dozen tourists who stood on the cobblestones of Red Square in a light snow and applauded when the hammer and sickle disappeared. It was an inglorious end for a regime that had, in many ways, defined the 20th century.

Gerd Ludwig first photographed the aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster for National Geographic Magazine in 1993 . Retrieved 4 October 2018. Broken Empire: After the Fall of the USSR, signed photo book gerdludwig.

Gerd Ludwig first photographed the aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster for National Geographic Magazine in 1993, and again in 2005. In 2011, he created a kickstarter campaign that supported his return to the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone to continue his ongoing coverage of the aftermath of the world's worst nuclear disaster to date, becoming one of the first internationally recognized documentary photographers to utilize crowdfunding for a personal project. Profil Gerd Ludwig visapourlimage.

Cover title: Broken Empire: After the Fall of the USSR. Boldly signed by the photographer Gerd Ludwig on the title page, no dedication. A fine copy of the first printing. Dust jacket protected in a mylar book cover. The book examines not only the fledgling country's notorious corruption and poverty-the only aspects of Russia covered by most Western media-but many lesser known facets, including the rise of a new urban generation committed to building a prosperous society.

Gerd Ludwig first photographed the aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster for National Geographic Magazine in 1993, and then later in 2005.

His work in the region resulted in his exhibition and book, Broken Empire: After the Fall of the USSR, a ten-year retrospective published by National Geographic in 2001. His ongoing coverage of post-Soviet Russia has garnered his distinction as being the western world’s foremost color photographer documenting the region. Gerd Ludwig is a veteran of the renowned A Day in the Life book series created by David Elliot Cohen and Rick Smolan. Gerd Ludwig first photographed the aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster for National Geographic Magazine in 1993, and then later in 2005.

Accompanied by stunning photographs, an extraordinary visual and textual record of the irresolute rebirth of Russia after the turbulent fall of the Soviet Union captures the many intricacies of this powerful country; reveals many unknown facets of Russia, including the rise of a new urban generation dedicated to creating a lucrative society; and takes readers into the daily lives of Russians.
Comments: (7)
LeXXXuS
Mr. Ludwig is the best at what he does. As a photographer with a background covering conflict, the images captured and collected in this book amaze me. I wish I had the eye to capture moments like Mr. Ludwig. This is an important historical work.
Wild Python
This is just the book I've been looking for. I've bought other books on Russia that explained the change from communism to capitalism but they only told how it affected the government. I wanted to know how it affected the people. This book does that. Although there is a lot of text, there are a lot of pictures. Between the two, it tells the story. The only thing is I wish it was more recent. It was published in 2001. I'm sure some more recent stories have been put out by the author in the National Geographic Magazine. I strongly recommend this book to anyone interested in Russia and geography.
Уou ll never walk alone
No doubt, Gerd Ludwig is a very talented photographer. However the Russia he shows is packaged to fit expectations of a clueless Westerner. Ludwig shows the disgusting reality, the poverty, and philistine Russian entrepreneurs to contrast all this. A perfect photojournalistic essay!
Ludwig is himself clueless. By bringing up all the dirt he forgets that Russians are much more complex than his ugly pictures. Russians know that they live in substandard material conditions! However the drama is that their will power is so exceptionally strong that they are able to ignore the dirt in life, and enjoy its most wonderful moments: a beautiful sunset, a meadow full of flowers, a pretty cloud. Where is all that in this book? Instead, we see a hustly society that's struggling to be like the West with some dubious success.
Celace
Having always been fascinated by Russia - my curiosity piqued by its reemergence as a global superpower - I was very glad to discover this book. Surprisingly, it was the only photographic account I could find of the vast socio-economic changes in the region since the demise of the Soviet Union. The fact that Ludwig, a German born photojournalist residing in Los Angeles, was able to capture such an intimate, knowledgeable, and compassionate portrait of a largely closed society is worthy of praise. While his coverage of Russia during and after the Soviet Empire includes an unflinching account of the many cultural and ecological atrocities committed by its leaders, his viewpoint remains balanced - a welcome change from the frankly one-dimensional stance often imposed by a lingering Red Menace wary West. Ludwig's photographs - almost exclusively of people experiencing the joys, tragedies, and challenges of everyday life - offer a unique window into the Russian soul. His images are complex and often emotional, yet unencumbered by sentiment, reminding us that the true identity of a nation lives in the hearts and minds of its people.

While there have been many changes in the region since the book's publication in 2001, Ludwig's work lays the sociological groundwork necessary for outsiders to grasp the effects of the warp speed transformation that continues to rock Russia today. Hopefully his more recent coverage, some of which continues to be published by National Geographic Magazine, will again find its way collectively into book form. I for one would like to better understand the true heart of this still mysterious and increasingly powerful nation.
Zainian
astonishingly shocking at times and bland at others, is this the Russia of modern day or is this the image the author sees? Certainly the latter and probably not the former. Wonder how the people of Russia feel about this commentary in pictures on their existence? Bleak and disheartening comes to mind. Could a similar tome be assembled on America...of course if one looks hard enough at any topic the horror can be visualized.
Bludsong
Gerd Ludwig photography is first-class but I wish written text had been as creative as the photographer's eye. Nothing to discredit the author, Fen Montaigne. But Fen, must you be so boring and bland. A single image captured a thousand words and your text was a dreadful mono-tone grounded in a yawning choice of vocabulary.
If your looking for images and insight text read "The Home Planet" by Kevin W Kelley. Two different subject matters, but the written text illustrates where this book went astray.
Άνουβις
Broken Empire leaves an indelible mark on the memory. This stunning work presents a passionate and proud people, ravaged by the merciless process of political change. The book's coverage of the effect on the Russian environmental landscape alone, makes this a documentary of great importance. But most unforgettable, are the images which capture the entire spectrum of human experience that the nation's new self-image has imposed - from humiliation and despair, to dignity and triumph of the spirit against all odds - making this work an uncompromising testament to the historic realities of post-communistic Russia.
An incredible journey through the remains of the former Soviet Union both in pictures and words. Broken Empire puts the lie to the "Workers Paradise" promised by the USSR's once all-powerful communist regime, revealing the harsh realities of environmental and spiritual decay left in its wake. The images are dazzling and heartbreaking. A must see and read book for anyone who loves truth.
JH
eBooks Related to Broken Empire : After the Fall of the USSR
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020