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eBook Lee Friedlander: Sticks & Stones: Architectural America epub

by James Enyeart,Lee Friedlander

eBook Lee Friedlander: Sticks & Stones: Architectural America epub
  • ISBN: 1891024973
  • Author: James Enyeart,Lee Friedlander
  • Genre: Photography
  • Subcategory: Photography & Video
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: D.A.P./Fraenkel Gallery; First edition (October 2, 2004)
  • Pages: 216 pages
  • ePUB size: 1470 kb
  • FB2 size 1452 kb
  • Formats doc azw lit mobi


In Sticks & Stones, Lee Friedlander offers his view of America as seen through its architecture.

In Sticks & Stones, Lee Friedlander offers his view of America as seen through its architecture. In 192 square-format pictures shot over the past 15 years. Some nice videos of Lee too

Lee Friedlander: Sticks and Stones: Architectural America. By Friedlander and James Enyeart

Lee Friedlander: Sticks and Stones: Architectural America. San Francisco: Fraenkel Gallery, 2004. By Friedlander and James Enyeart. New York: Museum of Modern Art, 2005 2017: Lee Friedlander in Louisiana, New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, L. .2018: Lee Friedlander: American Musicians, New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, L.

Lee Friedlander; James Enyeart. Photographer Friedlander offers his view of America as seen through its architecture. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Shot during the course of countless trips to urban and rural areas across the country, many of them made by car, these pictures capture an America as unblemished by romanticized notions of human nature as it is full of quirky human touches. In Sticks & Stones, Lee Friedlander offers his view of America as seen through its architecture.

Lee Friedlander, James Enyeart. In 192 square-format pictures shot over the past 15 years, Friedlander has framed the familiar through his own unique way of seeing the world. Whether he's representing modest vernacular buildings or monumental skyscrapers, Friedlander liberates them from our preconceived notions and gives us a new way of looking at our surrounding environment.

In Sticks & Stones, Lee Friedlander offers his view of America as seen .Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Sticks and Stones: Architectural America as Want to Read

In Sticks & Stones, Lee Friedlander offers his view of America as seen . Start by marking Sticks and Stones: Architectural America as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Friedlander’s professional work honed his craft, made him a traveler, and introduced him to a widening circle of friends

Friedlander’s professional work honed his craft, made him a traveler, and introduced him to a widening circle of friends. Most impressive among the completed projects is Sticks & Stones: Architectural America (published in 2004), the latest chapter in Friedlander’s uniquely vivid and far-reaching exploration of contemporary America. Presented in depth for the first time in this book are the results of the photographer’s ongoing preoccupation with the grand natural landscape of the American West.

Fraenkel Gallery, 2004. Founded in 1997, BookFinder.

Lee Friedlander, born in 1934, began photographing the American social landscape in 1948. With an ability to organize a vast amount of visual information in dynamic compositions, Friedlander has made humorous and poignant images among the chaos of city life, dense natural landscape, and countless other subjects. Friedlander is also recognized for a group of self-portraits he began in the 1960s, reproduced in Self Portrait, an exploration that he turned to again in the late 1990s, and published in a monograph by Fraenkel Gallery in 2000.

Lee Friedlander: Sticks and Stones: Architectural America. New York: Museum of Modern Art, 2005.

In Sticks & Stones, Lee Friedlander offers his view of America as seen through its architecture. In 192 square-format pictures shot over the past 15 years, Friedlander has framed the familiar through his own unique way of seeing the world. Whether he's representing modest vernacular buildings or monumental skyscrapers, Friedlander liberates them from our preconceived notions and gives us a new way of looking at our surrounding environment. Shot during the course of countless trips to urban and rural areas across the country, many of them made by car (the driver's window sometimes providing Friedlander with an extra frame), these pictures capture an America as unblemished by romanticized notions of human nature as it is full of quirky human touches. Nevertheless, man's presence is not at stake here; streets, roads, façades and buildings offer their own visual intrigue, without reference to their makers. And in the end, it is not even the grand buildings themselves that prick our interest, but rather the forgettable architectural elements--the poles, posts, sidewalks, fences, phone booths, alleys, parked cars--that through photographic juxtaposition with all kinds of buildings help us to discover the spirit of an Architectural America.
Comments: (5)
Gholbithris
Lee Friedlander gives us a broad perspective of the vernacular, commonplace in American architecture. These photographs, taken at diverse locations across the continent over a number of years, show us what we might see every day in traveling to various cities and towns. The photographer deliberately avoids showing us aesthetically pleasing, creatively attractive structures which do exist in most parts of the U.S.

Although the book is devoted to architectural styles, the overall impression conveyed is that of isolation and loneliness, due to the absence of people in places where we might expect to see pedestrians moving about. This is because many of the photographs are more on the order of scenics rather than focusing on structural details of the buildings.

Some of the 196 images are clear in intent as to subject matter. However, many of them contain obstructions, such as poles, signs, vegetation and especially numerous chain-link fences. These busy photographs confuse the viewer and detract from the overall intent to display architectural America. Taken with a wide angle lens from a distance, this is a consequence which could have been avoided by using a longer lens, by getting closer to the subject, or by not shooting the subject. Also, the shadow of the photographer appears at the bottom of many of the photos, and in one of them there is a white spot indicating lens flare. I don't understand why more editing wasn't done here. The included essay by James Enyeart doesn't help much.

In general, this was an excellent effort, but it falls short on execution.
Tiainar
I doubt I'll ever own Lee Friedlander's masterpiece 'The American Monument' (not on retirees budget anyway) but I recently bought Sticks & Stones and I'm content to at least own his second masterpiece. What treat this book is!

Here are 196 square format photos of buildings and street scenes that only Friedland could have taken. Turn over the first few pages and you'll immediately be aware of his trademark: utility poles and chain-link fences (though it could also be any kind of street furniture) which form an integral part of the way he sees what is beyond them. By placing these visual elements up-front creates all kinds of wonders when his camera reveals what is in the distance. Throughout the book you'll come across photos that just stop you because they are so overwhelming in detail, foreground vertical and horizontal shapes and shadows merge and frame buildings in the distance which also create other shapes between themselves.

So many of these images made me smile inwardly at the way Friedland saturates many photos with irregular shapes and shadows yet what he uses to do this is just the everyday environment. There is a playfulness here that will grab your imagination and nicely you'll discover something fresh each time you open the book.

Outstanding photos demand quality printing and the book's production is superb. Printed by Meridian of East Greenwich, Rhode Island, using three hundred screen duotones on a matt semi-coated paper (in an edition of 6,000). Meridian have printed several Friedlander books. Incidentally you can see seventy-one similar photos in the fascinating monograph Friedlander though I have the impression that not all are in Sticks & Stones.

The book is a visual celebration by one of America's great photographers.

***FOR AN INSIDE LOOK click 'customer images' under the cover.
Xmatarryto
First off, you can ignore the 3-star rating here because this is a 5-star book all the way. If you don't know Friedlander, check him out online and become acquainted with his work before deciding to purchase this. Suffice it to say, if you like 'deadpan' work by the likes of Eggleston, Shore, Christenberry, and (Robert) Adams, you're probably a Friedlander fan too but don't know it yet. This book is huge, a little over a foot square, contains a little less than 200 B&W images, almost all in the square format. The printing is excellent with thick, heavy paper and since you always have a big image to look at, your eye will be busy exploring these photographs. I just finished this last night and will be starting over again tonight. Some of the images here are probably going to be in his "America by Car" book just because they are composed that way so maybe you'll see some duplication across these volumes.

I don't consider this a book about architecture per-se, to me it's more Friedlander cityscapes and searching for interesting compositional ideas. In any case, the book is a bargain for it's size vs price.

Some nice videos of Lee too:
[...]
Dorintrius
For years -- probably decades -- I've been hoping to find a collection of Friedlander's great photos of the urban and suburban landscape. I'd buy almost any survey or monograph just to have the two or three examples that might be thrown in among the works of others, or among Friedlander's own wide range of subjects.

I'm delighted to say it was worth the wait. Page after beautifully printed page of these compositional masterpieces in large format -- it's almost too good to be true.

Like other photographers of "Main Street" or the strip, Friedlander finds beauty in unlikely places. Or maybe it's that he has FUN in unlikely places. His special contribution seems to be in creating a breathtaking (and often comical) tension between polar opposites: order/disorder; flat/deep; simple/complex; central/peripheral; deadpan/melodramatic; earnest/ironic; subtle/obvious; and so on. Friedlander has photographed many great jazz musicians; these photographs suggest that he has been influenced by their music, as he creates great riffs on the raw material he finds in the built environment.

Incidentally, I've seen this book in the Architecture section of some bookstores, but don't be fooled -- it is not really about buildings.
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