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eBook Alphabet Juice: The Energies, Gists, and Spirits of Letters, Words, and Combinations Thereof; Their Roots, Bones, Innards, Piths, Pips, and Secret ... With Examples of Their Usage Foul and Savory epub

by Roy Blount Jr.

eBook Alphabet Juice: The Energies, Gists, and Spirits of Letters, Words, and Combinations Thereof; Their Roots, Bones, Innards, Piths, Pips, and Secret ... With Examples of Their Usage Foul and Savory epub
  • ISBN: 0374103690
  • Author: Roy Blount Jr.
  • Genre: Reference
  • Subcategory: Words Language & Grammar
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; 1st edition (October 14, 2008)
  • Pages: 384 pages
  • ePUB size: 1523 kb
  • FB2 size 1166 kb
  • Formats txt lrf mbr lit


With Examples of Their Usage Foul and Savory. 0374103690 (ISBN13: 9780374103699).

Roy Blount Jr. certainly has, and after forty years of making a living using words in every medium, print or electronic, except greeting cards, he still can't get over his ABCs. In Alphabet Juice, he celebrates the electricity, the juju, the sonic and kinetic energies, of letters and their combinations. Blount does not prescribe proper English. The franchise he claims is "over the counter. With Examples of Their Usage Foul and Savory.

With Examples of Their Usage Foul and Savory Paperback – September 29, 2009. Book 1 of 2 in the Alphabet Juice Series. Roy Blount J. s Alphabet Juice-a relatively short encyclopedic compendium of English usage-pretends to be a practical guide a la Strunk and White or Lynne Truss. But it has more in common with Voltaire's Philosophical Dictionary. The author might prefer a comparison to Ambrose Bierce's Devil's Dictionary.

In Alphabet Juice, he celebrates the electricity, the juju, the sonic and kinetic energies, of letters and their combinations.

Электронная книга "Alphabet Juice: The Energies, Gists, and Spirits of Letters, Words, and Combinations Thereof; Their Roots, Bones, Innards, Piths, Pips, and Secret Parts, Tinctures, Tonics, and Essences; With Examples of Their Usage Foul and Savory", Roy Blount, J. .

With Examples of Their Usage Foul and Savory", Roy Blount, Jr. Even the word arbitrary is shown to be no more arbitrary, at its roots, than go-to guy or crackerjack.

Аудиокнига "Alphabet Juice: The Energies, Gists, and Spirits of Letters, Words, and Combinations Thereof; Their Roots, Bones, Innards, Piths, Pips, and Secret Parts, Tinctures, Tonics, and Essences; With Examples of Their Usage Foul and Savory", Roy Blount, J.Читает Roy Blount, J.Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. In Alphabet Juice, he celebrates the juju, the sonic and kinetic energies of letters and their combinations.

Alphabet Juice: The Energies, Gists, and Spirits of Letters, Words, and Combinations Thereof; Their Roots, Bones, Innards, Piths, Pips, and Secret Parts, Tinctures, Tonics, and Essences; With Examples of Their Usage Foul and Savory by Roy Blount (Paperback, 2009). Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- Top picked items. Title:-Alphabet Juice: The Energies, Gists, and Spirits of Letters, Words, and Combinations Thereof; Their Roots, Bones, Innards, Piths. Read full description. See details and exclusions.

With Examples of Their Usage Foul and Savory. If everybody's first English teacher were Roy Blount J. we might still be trillions in debt, but we would be so deeply in love with words and their magic. that we'd hardly notice. Book in the Alphabet Juice Series). Steven Pinker, in Words and Rules, observes that pigs go oink oink in English, nøff nøff in Norwegian, and in Russian chrjo chrjo. Roy Blount Jr. is the author of twenty books, covering subjects from the Pittsburgh Steelers to Robert E. Lee, to trying to understand the South. He is a regular panelist on NPR’s Wait, Wait. Born in Indianapolis and raised in Decatur, Georgia, Blount now lives in western Massachusetts with his wife, the painter Joan Griswold. certainly has, and after forty years of making a living using words in every medium, print or electronic, except greeting cards, he still can’t get over his ABCs. The franchise he claims is  over the counter. Three and a half centuries ago, Thomas Blount produced Blount’s Glossographia, the first dictionary to explore derivations of English words.

Alphabet Juice The Energies, Gists, and Spirits of Letters, Words, and .

Alphabet Juice The Energies, Gists, and Spirits of Letters, Words, and Combinations Thereof; Their Roots, Bones, Innards, Piths, Pips, and Secret Parts, Tinctures, Tonics, and Essences; With Examples of Their Usage Foul and Savory. By Roy Blount Jr. 364 pages. has returned from the fields where the American lingo grows wild to write "Alphabet Juice," his personal lexicon, usage manual, writers' guidebook, etymological investigation and literary junk drawer. This alphabetically arranged book reads like a big bag of salty snacks: nibble five or six of its 500-plus entries and you'll have to wolf the whole thing.

Narrated by: Roy Blount Jr. Release date. Alphabet Juice: The Energies, Gists, and Spirits of Letters, Words, and Combinations Thereof.

Ali G: How many words does you know?

Noam Chomsky: Normally, humans, by maturity, have tens of thousands of them.

Ali G: What is some of 'em?

—Da Ali G ShowDid you know that both mammal and matter derive from baby talk? Have you noticed how wince makes you wince? Ever wonder why so many h-words have to do with breath?Roy Blount Jr. certainly has, and after forty years of making a living using words in every medium, print or electronic, except greeting cards, he still can’t get over his ABCs. In Alphabet Juice, he celebrates the electricity, the juju, the sonic and kinetic energies, of letters and their combinations. Blount does not prescribe proper English. The franchise he claims is “over the counter.” Three and a half centuries ago, Thomas Blount produced Blount’s Glossographia, the first dictionary to explore derivations of English words. This Blount’s Glossographia takes that pursuit to other levels, from Proto-Indo-European roots to your epiglottis.It rejects the standard linguistic notion that the connection between words and their meanings is “arbitrary.” Even the word arbitrary is shown to be no more arbitrary, at its root, than go-to guy or crackerjack. From sources as venerable as the OED (in which Blount finds an inconsistency, at whisk) and as fresh as Urbandictionary.com (to which Blount has contributed the number-one definition of alligator arm), and especially from the author’s own wide-ranging experience, Alphabet Juice derives an organic take on language that is unlike, and more fun than, any other.
Comments: (7)
Pryl
Normally, when I encounter a book whose subtitle consists of 32 words, I am reluctant to read it but that was not true of Alphabet Juice because I have read most of Roy Blount Jr.'s 20 previously published books and many of his articles. Accompanying Blount on any of his literary escapades always suggests to me what it would be like to be part of an exploration group co-led by Huckleberry Finn, Lewis Carroll, and Bill Bryson. That was especially true as I began to read Alphabet Juice in which Blount delivers everything promised in the book's 32-word subtitle. The material is organized within the framework of the alphabet as he wanders through hundreds of words and phrases, sharing his thoughts about them and anything he associates with them. True to form, in what presumably is his introduction, he immediately discusses the relationship between a word and its meaning, cites Steven Pinker's observation that pigs go "oink oink" in English and "chrjo chrjo" in Russian, adds his own observation that baby chicks go "peep peep" in English and "piyo piyo" in Japanese, and shifts his attention to various mispronunciations of other words.

With regard to the book's title, Blount explains that "Alphabet Juice is my glossographia. Juice as in au jus, juju, power, electricity. (Loose words and clauses left lying around are like loose live wires - they'll short-circuit, burn out, disempower your lights.)" Then he shifts his attention to "a woman walking down the street wearing some highly low-cut shorts," adds a "Note" about the use of boldface and explains abbreviations of reference books frequently used before entering A, the first of 26 stops during his journey of exploration throughout a world inhabited by "the energies, gists, and spirits of letters, words, and combinations thereof; their roots, bones, innards, piths, pips, and secret parts, tinctures, tonics, and essences; with examples, of their usage foul and savory."

Here is Dallas, we have a Farmer's Market near downtown at which some of the merchants offer slices of fresh fruit as samples. In the same spirit, I now offer a few brief excerpts from Blount's book to suggest the thrust of his thinking and the "flavor" of his writing style.

Examples of figures of speech "which so far as I know have not yet been used in literature" (Page 100):

"I feel like a hog starin' at a wristwatch."
"She ran home so fast you could play dice on the tail of her coat."
"Tea so strong you could trot a mouse on it."
"Quiet as a mosquito doing push-ups on a lemon meringue pie."
"He looked like he'd been sortin' wildcats."
"Quick as a hiccup."

"If you had never seen the word [onomatopoeia] before, you wouldn't suspect, from the sound of it, that it means what it means. Nor would you from its etymology: it comes from the Greek for `coining names,' not from the Greek for `sounding like it means.' And if I were the commissioner of spelling I would drop the o after the p: this word looks plenty Greek enough without clinging to a poe pronounced pee." (Page 221)

"Here's a word [qualm], like terrific, from which much of the force has been leached, by usage influenced by sound. According to Chambers [i.e. the Chambers Dictionary of Etymology], qualm comes from the Old High German for `death and destruction,' then the Middle English for `pestilence, plague.' It has come to mean no more than a sudden uneasiness, perhaps a bit of nausea, or just, by extension into abstract, a misgiving. That's what it sounds like it ought to mean." (Page 244)

With regard to the split infinitive, "There was a time, in the nineteenth century, when persnickety grammarians categorically deplored putting anything between the to and the verb. These days, no one condemns `to boldly go where none have gone before,' whose rhythm is catchy, or "The bishop has resolved to painstakingly separate the men from the boys.' But it is wise to rigorously keep an eye on the infinitive as a unit." (Page 281)

The word zafti means "plump in a good way; with a well-rounded figure; full-bodiedly curvy. But it comes from the Yiddish zaftik, juicy, succulent. Same root, way back, as in sap, the juice in a tree." (Page 361)

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book and highly recommend it and Blount's previously published Long Time Leaving: Dispatches from Up South and About Three Bricks Shy: And The Load Filled Up as well as Pinker's The Stuff of Thought: Language as a Window into Human Nature and The Language Instinct: How the Mind Creates Language, John McWhorter's Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue: The Untold Story of English, and Henry Hitchings' The Secret Life of Words: How English Became English. A careful reading of these books will provide an excellent preparation for Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel, Through the Looking-Glass.
Painwind
This is a masterwork of analysis, and a love story to the English language. He keeps it light, informative, and gets you thinking. I REALLY recommend this book to anyone who loves English. If you already love Roy Blount's work, you'll DEFINITELY love Alphabet Juice and Alphabetter Juice.
Modred
This was such a FUN book! It's also unlike any other book out there--part dictionary, part etymological treatise, and part grammar & usage guide woven through with fun anecdotes and ridiculous cross references, it's a gift to word and language geeks!

It's also nearly impossible *not* to start mouthing words aloud as you read it, playing with pronunciations and letting lips lips linger over logia--I nearly got kicked off the quiet car on the train a few times, because I couldn't NOT (double negative) remain quiet.
Opilar
I must have at least a half dozen books on language, with titles like The Word Museum, Words and Phrases Origins, Word Play and Words at Play. But somehow I've never quite had the urge to dig into them. Then I saw a thumbnail review of Alphabet Juice in the NY Times book review. Something in the review (or perhaps the name of the book) grabbed me. Jotting down examples I could share with my book group I came up with 14 separate right-on comments. The first one, in the Introduction, before tackling each letter of the alphabet, was this:"I do hope you realize that every time you use disinterested to mean uninterested an angel dies..." and then there was the Kinky Friedman quote:"Never try to climb a fence leaning toward you or kiss a woman leaning away from you."

As others have pointed out this is not a book to be read over a weekend. However, I found it perfect for my several weekly rides on Metro, Washington's subway. If you love words and take this in small doses I'm sure you'll find at least as many favorite quotes and references as I did.
Kamuro
An interesting compilation, with Blount's own take and opinions (sometimes) on his selected words and phrases, and an expansion on each letter of the alphabet. It's certainly not a novel, but is OK as a bathroom reader or casual pick-up. For word freaks it's another book for their library, and the takes and origins and etomology Blount pursues are interesting and sometimes intrigueing. Certainly not an instructional or style book, but fun and informative if you like words, phrases, applications, exceptions, and down-to-earth commentary on usage.

Blount hopes the reader will page through the self-contained cross-references he uses to help know the yesses and no's (yeas and nays?) of sentence parts, like commas, dashes, colons, stuff like that. His intention is to take some of the unnecessary fluff out of word-use and sense, and he does that pretty well. Remove the pompous.

Pretty cool.
Twentyfirstfinger
Arrived as described. Excellent book and hope to read all of Roy Blunt Jr. books.
Questanthr
Alphabet Juice by Roy Blount, jr. is a romp. Blount has brought together etymology, humor and erudition in his investigation into words and they wayward journeys in the English language. This book is a real joy to read, a treasure of usages, and a reminder of the wonders of language.
Roy Blount is clever and chatty, and has surely done his homework. If you're looking for narrative about word origins and their connections to other words and ideas, this is definitely your book. It wasn't quite as easy to find individual words as I had hoped, but that said, it's a pretty good read.
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