» » The Discovery of the Source of the Nile

eBook The Discovery of the Source of the Nile epub

by John Hanning Speke

eBook The Discovery of the Source of the Nile epub
  • ISBN: 1406830089
  • Author: John Hanning Speke
  • Genre: Reference
  • Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Echo Library (October 2, 2006)
  • Pages: 360 pages
  • ePUB size: 1159 kb
  • FB2 size 1316 kb
  • Formats lrf mobi rtf lit


Book digitized by Google from the library of the New York Public Library and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tp. You keep us going and growing – with your support we will do even more in 2020. Happy New Year! –The Internet Archive Team.

Book digitized by Google from the library of the New York Public Library and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tp. We’ve reached our goal! Dear Internet Archive Supporters, Thank you for helping us reach our fundraising goal.

The achievements of Speke and his team was incredible, but the writing was dull. The characters all ran together, and they seemed to encounter the same I read this book as part of an effort to read all 100 "Top Adventure Books" as named by National Geographic

The achievements of Speke and his team was incredible, but the writing was dull. The characters all ran together, and they seemed to encounter the same I read this book as part of an effort to read all 100 "Top Adventure Books" as named by National Geographic. This read was like eating my broccoli at dinner. It was good for me (I learned a lot), but the slog through the book reminded me of the slog through the pile of cold, limp broccoli. It wasn't fun, and there was still a lot more to go. The achievements of Speke and his team was incredible, but the writing was dull.

Journal Of The Discovery. has been added to your Cart. Speke writes well, in the style of the mid 1800s but vividly. Reader Alerts: If you like first-hand stories of travel from the 1860s, this may be your cup of tea with crumpets added.

Report an error in the book. One fee. Stacks of books. Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once).

But in the centre of the continent, within 5° of the equator, we find the rains much more lasting. Another source of revenue is in the effects of all people condemned for sorcery, who are either burnt, or speared and cast into the jungles, and their property seized by the grey-beards for their chief.

You can read What Led to the Discovery.

You can read What Led to the Discovery of the Source of the Nile by Speke John Hanning in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

The journals of John Hanning Speke, the British Indian Army officer who was the first European to discover Lake .

The journals of John Hanning Speke, the British Indian Army officer who was the first European to discover Lake Victoria, the source of the River Nile.

With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible . More by John Hanning Speke. Include any personal information. Mention spoilers or the book's price. 0) 50 characters minimum.

With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items. Your Shopping Cart is empty. There are currently no items in your Shopping Cart. The Discovery of the Source of the Nile. Works of John Hanning Speke. Discovery of the Source of the Nile. What Led to the Discovery of the Source of the Nile.

He controversially gave lectures about the lakes in London in 1859, without awaiting Burton's return

An account of an historic but controversial exploration
Comments: (7)
Anarus
Great book on African adventure. If you like this book you will want to read the following 99 cent classics of African travels:
1. Alone Among the Zulus: The Narrative of a Journey Through the Zulu Country, South Africa (1866)
2. First Footsteps in East Africa or, An Exploration of Harar [Illustrated] (1856)
3. Tropical Africa (1889)
4. A Camera Actress in the Wilds of Togoland (1915)
5. The Life and Exploits of Hugh Clapperton the Distinguished Voyager, Adventurer, and Discoverer (1840)
6. Scouting for Stanley in East Africa (1890)
7. Through the Kalahari Desert (1886)
8. Lassoing Wild Animals in Africa (Illustrated) (1911)
9. Stories of the Gorilla Country (1870)
10. The Unknown Horn of Africa (1888) (With active table of contents)
riki
John Hanning Speke's story of finding the Source of the Nile as Lake Victoria. It seems to be his attempt for him to get away from Richard Francis Burton's attempt to control the story and to make the source as something else other than Victoria. He tried to put his controubuion into the light and dispell himself as doing nothing for their travels together.
FireWater
Speke is a poor observer and writer but his journey was extraordinary. It is a pity he was more concerned with the details of organising his porters than writing about the peoples he passed through.
Mustard Forgotten
An interesting travel back in time. Interesting how little Africa seems to have changed in 150 years. Would loved to have had a map readable on the Kindle to follow Speke's progress.
Sat
3.5 stars. The book is really in two parts, the first half consisting of the author's attempts to explore the hinterlands of Somalia as part of an expedition headed by Richard Burton that ended disastrously and the second half the author's explorations again with Burton from Zanzibar on the coast inland to Lake Tanganyika and from there to Lake Victoria (of which the author laid to claim to being the first European to discover). The narrative is mainly a recounting of the various geographical points of interest (there were some hills, then more hills and then ooh, some grassy plains) and endless naming the various tribes they encountered. Well known story, very dry recounting and short on adventure or episodes of real interest. First half I found much more enjoyable.
Wizer
This edition, the White Star one, is really a beautiful edition. It's a nice small size for holding in your hand. It's got some great illustrations, both old style and some modern photos. The page number listed above is way off, though. It's a little over 700 pages. There are a number of typos, too.

This was written in a pretty hurried style and it can be pretty hard to follow pretty often. It would be nice to have an edition with a glossary and a lot of annotations to try and clear up what is actually going on and why.

This book has very little geographical or exploration material in it, unless you count going to a heavily populated area that hasn't been visited before by Europeans exploration. Most of the material is devoted to wrangling with the Africans, either the porters or the various chiefs and kings. The true value of this book at the time it was written was, I am sure, as a report on trading prospects with these people, what they have to offer and how to deal with them.

I've read over a half dozen 1st-person narratives about African exploration at this point and I'm heartily sick of them. The whole continent (apart from the desert, obviously) has been heavily populated for millennia, the population comprising a deeply entrenched, low-tech civilization. The narratives are consistently concerned with endless, repetitive wrangling with the native inhabitants who are in the habit of to taxing caravans traveling through their territories and in taking max advantage of any travelers traveling through. I don't think I'll be reading very many more of these.

Speke seems like a good guy and you can't help admiring his dedication and determination. But I grew sick of this book about half-way through and couldn't wait to get out of it. The middle section on his protracted stay as a guest of Mtesa in Uganda was especially dreary and it takes up about a quarter of the book.
Sti
I read this in PDF format.

I read this after completing his main work, "Journal of the Discovery". This book is actually more interesting, there's more variety and definitely more drama. The two main dramatic incidents are the attack by Somali raiders at the end of the first, Somali, part, and the very famous beetle-in-the-ear episode towards the beginning of the Lake Tanganyika part. In fact, I recommend just reading those two parts as the rest of the book is pretty dull and humdrum. I guess the Kindle version is searchable and there's a Project Gutenberg version available online that's searchable.

If you do read the whole thing then be prepared for a lot of daily travel and wrangling stuff. Most of the wrangling is with the porters whereas in the "Journal" book most of the wrangling was with the chiefs whose territories he passed through.
eBooks Related to The Discovery of the Source of the Nile
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020