» » This Book Contains Graphic Language: Comics as Literature

eBook This Book Contains Graphic Language: Comics as Literature epub

by Rocco Versaci

eBook This Book Contains Graphic Language: Comics as Literature epub
  • ISBN: 0826428789
  • Author: Rocco Versaci
  • Genre: Reference
  • Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic (December 15, 2007)
  • Pages: 248 pages
  • ePUB size: 1346 kb
  • FB2 size 1302 kb
  • Formats mbr doc rtf lrf


These literatures include prose memoir, Holocaust memoir, journalism, film, and-for lack of a better term-the &"classics. amp;" Each richly-illustrated chapter outlines the key issues of one of these forms and then explores how comic books have been able to reflect and expand upon those issues in unique ways.

This is a decent if unspectacular apologia for comics.

These literatures include prose memoir, Holocaust memoir, journalism, film, and-for lack of a better term-the "classics. This is a decent if unspectacular apologia for comics. The title makes Versaci's thesis clear, but for anyone who missed it, he's careful to repeat rather more than necessary that "comics can do x and medium y can't, therefore comics have literary merit.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 217-231) and index.

The book has been read but remains in clean condition. All pages are intact and the cover is intact.

Chapter One: Why Comics? Chapter Two: Creating a 'Special Reality Chapter Three: ReMaustering the Past Chapter Four: The 'New Journalism' Revisited Chapter Five: Guerilla Warfare and Sneak Attack. More).

Part of Versaci’s endeavor in this book is to defend comics from their critics and detractors by introducing readers to a selection of powerful, narrative- and character-driven, self-reflective works, including Art Spiegelman’s Maus, Harvey Pekar’s American Splendor, Joe Sacco’s Palestine, and Daniel Clowes’s Eightball, all of which, Versaci demonstrates, have earned the right to be taken.

7. See McChesney and Nichols for a lengthy discussion on why investigative journalism is an endangered species. Please don’t look away. URGENT: Time is running out to make your end-of-year donation to support independent journalism. Truthout is a nonprofit and we depend on readers just like you to survive.

However, the visual dimension of comics allows comic book memoirists to overcome this potential paradox.

<span style="font-style: italic;">This Book Contains Graphic Language</span> looks at different literary forms and genres—including journalism, fiction, memoirs, and film—in relation to their comic book counterparts. By demonstrating the ways in which comic books (and graphic novels) both reflect upon, and expand the boundaries of literature, Rocco Versaci demonstrates that comics have earned the right to be taken just as seriously as any other literary form.<br />As comics and graphic novels become more popular than ever, literary critics are finding that they now have a new subject to examine. But while many advocates of the medium maintain that comics are a true art form, there have been no detailed comparisons among comics and "legitimate" types of literature. Filling this void, This Book Contains Graphic Language examines different literary forms in relation to their comic book counterparts. These literatures include prose memoir, Holocaust memoir, journalism, film, and-for lack of a better term-the "classics." Each richly-illustrated chapter outlines the key issues of one of these forms and then explores how comic books have been able to reflect and expand upon those issues in unique ways. <br /><br />The comics discussed include Eightball by Daniel Clowes, Love and Rockets by Jaime and Gilbert Hernandez, American Splendor by Harvey Pekar, Maus by Art Spiegelman, Palestine by Joe Sacco, Frontline Combat and Two-Fisted Tales from EC Comics, Sandman by Neil Gaiman and League of Extraordinary Gentlemen by Alan Moore.  By examining the ways in which these and other comic books and graphic novels expand the boundaries of literature, English professor Rocco Versaci demonstrates that the medium of comics has earned the right to be regarded as an important artistic and literary form.<br />>
Comments: (5)
Mr.Death
I purchased this book intrigued by the title. I wondered how a Literature professor justified his love for comics and his conviction that the medium qualifies as literature. Not that I doubted the medium since I am in the process of writing a graphic novel.
Roscco Versaci makes a thorough analysis of this hybrid and versatile medium. He explores the effective way in which memoires of the Holocaust, war stories, reportage (creative non fiction), and literature have been presented in the comic adding depth of meaning, layers of content, and a distictive narrators voice due to its graphic nature. For anyone in the process of writing a graphic novel the examples presented in each chapter help to visualize the potential of the medium and how others have taken advantage of it. I found of special interest chapter 3 in which the author compares the sustained and deep emotional impact that a graphic novel such as Maus exerts over the reader in contrast to the response a viewer of photographs depicting the horrors of the Holocaust may have.
The book is easy to read, interesting and enlightening. In some chapters I would have appreciated more illustrations and not just descriptions.
Finally a warning,in my copy there is text missing from the end of page 148 and the first line of page 149. I believe there has been an omission of material.
Oparae
Versaci's plea for the cultural value of comics begins well. His writing is clear with a welcoming tone and the first two chapters are the best in the book. After those chapters, though, the book falls into familiar territory: retreads of why comics are considered "low" culture in the United States, and a tour through the standard texts that challenge that assumption. This material has already been covered by better writers and researchers (most notably by Joseph Witek back in 1989). Versaci fails to bring something new. A chapter on Spiegelman's Maus? A chapter on EC war comics? A short discussion of Neil Gaiman's use of Shakespeare? There are no surprises here, just the usual suspects and pleas for respect. (Comics criticism must stop apologizing for its subject matter.) This is too bad because Versaci has some great insights here and he makes some productive parallels across genres and mediums. But there is too little in the way of sustained analysis -- Versaci makes promising points but seldom develops them in any detail. And the serious typos in the book (including several pages which are printed out of order) don't help either. The book is generally disappointing, a predictable retread, but those first chapters are worth reading.
Bynelad
Rocco Versaci's analysis and evaluation of the comic book as a form of visual language on its own merit is a wonderful, informative, intelligent and well-tought out argument. His examples in all the chapters are not always the most popular or the most accessible, but they do truly illustrate the point he is trying to make. This was purchased as research for my own Master's Thesis on the development of the Graphic Novel, and I have found it not only informative, but it has opened me up to even more authors and given me a chance to truly think about and analyze the comic books I have read. If anyone is doing research on comic books or "graphic novels," I would put this in the top ten books needed for such a purpose.
Gavirim
Versacci explains the generational appeal of comics and graphic novels and the resurgence of the genre for 21st century readers. The book reveals why a graphic novel can reach readers, when other forms of literature cannot. It is rich in historical detail and insight and could be a text for teaching the art of the Graphic Novel or certainly a reference for anyone exploring the art on his own.
Mbon
My experience with comic books has been very limited (most of my experience involves listening to my brother and his friends discuss their favorites). However, I really enjoyed this book. It was a good primer for those of us who have only a passing knowledge of the genre, but would also be interesting for comic book expert. I highly recommend it.
eBooks Related to This Book Contains Graphic Language: Comics as Literature
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020