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eBook Wall to Wall: From Beijing to Berlin by Rail epub

by Mary Morris

eBook Wall to Wall: From Beijing to Berlin by Rail epub
  • ISBN: 0241131774
  • Author: Mary Morris
  • Genre: Reference
  • Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Hamish Hamilton Ltd (1992)
  • Pages: 288 pages
  • ePUB size: 1720 kb
  • FB2 size 1890 kb
  • Formats lit docx doc rtf


Wall to Wall" is not your standard travelogue where a relatively anonymous narrator embarks on a journey and amuses and entertains you with stories about the places, sites and people along the way. Mary Morris begins her journey weighed down by a myriad of worries of her ow. .

by. Morris, Mary, 1947-.

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Morris gives personal insight into what it was like to travel by train from Beijing to Berlin during the 1986 Chernobyl disaster. She also also gives political, historical, and cultural context to the places she visited. The book is a quick read and I would recommend it to anyone interested in travel memoirs or the Soviet Union in the mid-1980s.

Wall to Wall: From Beijing to Berlin by Rail, 1991. Nothing to Declare: memoirs of a woman travelling alone, 1988.

This book hints at that, albeit by contrast with the state of ruin and lost opportunity that prevailed in 1986 three years before the Wall came down and six years before east-west travel was once again truly free.

Author: Mary McGarry Morris ISBN 10: 038541465X. May Rail Rail Transportation Magazines. Title: Wall to Wall: From Beijing to Berlin by Rail Item Condition: used item in a good condition. Will be clean, not soiled or stained. May Model Rail Transportation Magazines. May Rail Magazines in English.

The year is 1986, and Mary Morris is at the American Embassy in Beijing .

The year is 1986, and Mary Morris is at the American Embassy in Beijing, desperate for information about the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. She is days away from departing on a train to Nezhin, her beloved grandmother’s hometown, not far from Chernobyl. 2. Maiden Voyage by Tania Aebi with Bernadette Brennan.

Wall to Wall: From Beijing to Berlin by Rail. Nothing to Declare: Memoirs of a Woman Traveling Alone. This book is a work of fiction. Names, characters, businesses, organizations, places, events, and incidents either are the product of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, events, or locales is entirely coincidental.

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Comments: (6)
X-MEN
I read this book for the first time years ago before departing on my own journey abroad. I just gave a copy to my young sister-in-law before she departed for a semester in London. I highly recommend this for anyone who likes travel writing. It's a bit more of a memoir that someone like Theroux but I enjoyed that.
Togar
This is a very interesting book, about a series of north-Eurasian-corridor lands (China, Mongolia, Russia/Belarus/Ukraine, Poland, and Germany) as they were in 1986, at the dawn of the Gorbachev era but before the breakup of the USSR or the East Bloc could have been seriously envisioned as a realistic possibility.
The book also drives home the fact that geographically Asia and Europe are one and the same continent, with all the movement and give-and-take of peoples (and ideas) that basic fact would allow for and imply. The Eurasian continent's southern half is dominated by a series of high mountain chains, but its northern half (through which the author traveled) is for the most part lowland plain, which makes it a natural conveyor-belt of ralatively easy travel between East and West, for invaders as well as for migrants and tourists. Berlin (the author's endpoint) is just east of the point where the southern mountain-chains compress the northern plain to its narrowest width, thus forcing invaders from the east (like the Mongols, whose empire stretched from Korea to the eastern part of pre-war Germany) to slow down, stop and consolidate their advance. Berlin is thus a natural stopping-point, crossroads and focal point for Eurasia, and it should be one of the world's great cosmopolitan cities, with large communities of prople from every country on that Eurasian continuum from Japan/Korea/China to the Netherlands/Belgium/France/Britain. This book hints at that, albeit by contrast with the state of ruin and lost opportunity that prevailed in 1986 three years before the Wall came down and six years before east-west travel was once again truly free.
Skiletus
Excellent service and enjoying the book!
Sat
Mary Morris is one of my favorite authors. This book recounts her travels on from Beijing to Moscow via the trans-Siberia railway ALONE. Amazing.
Zodama
"Wall to Wall" is not your standard travelogue where a relatively anonymous narrator embarks on a journey and amuses and entertains you with stories about the places, sites and people along the way. Mary Morris begins her journey weighed down by a myriad of worries of her own, some of them deeply personal which she is quite happy to share with the reader as well as many of the other strangers she meets along the way. A large motive behind her trip from Beijing to Berlin is a family odyssey, travelling to the Ukranian village her great grandmother's family fled from nearly a century previously. We get to learn a fair bit about her family then and now as she struggles with uncomprehending and unhelpful bureaucracy to secure the necessary travel permits.

The real challenge though is working out just what the breaking news of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster means for her, physically and logistically, as the village she is so determined to visit is at the epi-centre of the tragedy. The long days on the trains provide her a great platform for observations on her travelling companions and the staff for whom the trains are home and work. This is more conventional ground for a travel writer and Morris does a great job presenting the human face of the nations hidden behind the walls. The glimpses we are given of life in the uncertain times of the mid 1980s as well as the confusion and ignorance around the world's greatest nuclear tragedy are memorable.
Kazijora
The writer is very negative throughout her book - the places she visited and the people she encountered, the countries these places and people represented at that particular time she was traveling. As matter of fact, the writer seems to hold a negative view on her life experience as a whole - her memories of the past, and the hearsays she obtained second hand, and the relationships she was in during that particular period of her life of the travel. As a travel book, it has very limited factual information to offer. The writer tends to generalise some very biased personal conclusions based on her observations limited by the time and space. Not recommended - I aborted the reading halfway.
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