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eBook Christopher Hitchens and His Critics: Terror, Iraq, and the Left epub

by Thomas Cushman,Simon Cottee,Christopher Hitchens

eBook Christopher Hitchens and His Critics: Terror, Iraq, and the Left epub
  • ISBN: 0814716865
  • Author: Thomas Cushman,Simon Cottee,Christopher Hitchens
  • Genre: Reference
  • Subcategory: Writing Research & Publishing Guides
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: NYU Press (June 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 392 pages
  • ePUB size: 1977 kb
  • FB2 size 1874 kb
  • Formats lrf txt azw lit


Christopher Hitchens-political journalist, cultural critic, public intellectual and self-described contrarian-is . This volume brings together Hitchens's most incisive reflections on the war on terror, the war in Iraq, and the state of the contemporary Left.

Christopher Hitchens-political journalist, cultural critic, public intellectual and self-described contrarian-is one of the most controversial and prolific writers of his generation. His most recent book, God Is Not Great, was on the New York Times bestseller list in 2007 for months. Like his hero, George Orwell, Hitchens is a tireless opponent of all forms of cruelty, ideological dogma, religious superstition and intellectual obfuscation. Once a socialist, he now refers to himself as an unaffiliated radical.

Christopher Hitchens-political journalist, cultural critic, public . Terror, Iraq, and the Left. by Thomas Cushman, Simon Cottee, Christopher Hitchens. Books related to Christopher Hitchens and His Critics. Christopher Hitchens.

Christopher Hitchens-political journalist, cultural critic, public intellectual and self-described contrarian-is one o. .

by Thomas Cushman & Simon Cottee & Christopher Hitchens. Ask yourself: What do you fear about leaving a bad job or a bad relationship?

by Thomas Cushman & Simon Cottee & Christopher Hitchens. Dietary Reference Intakes. 306 Pages·2001·886 KB·13,681 Downloads·New! Since 1994, the Institute of Medicine's Food and Nutrition Board has been involved in developing. Frontiers in Massive Data Analysis. Ask yourself: What do you fear about leaving a bad job or a bad relationship?

The true value of Christopher Hitchens and His Critics lies in the clarity that comes from its convenience. Rather than just writing about him, Cottee and Cushman chose to bring together many of his pieces and let the inimitable firebrand speak for himself

The true value of Christopher Hitchens and His Critics lies in the clarity that comes from its convenience. Rather than just writing about him, Cottee and Cushman chose to bring together many of his pieces and let the inimitable firebrand speak for himself. Thus one is able to read from his widely published works, all neatly divided by subject, and gather a firm sense of how this reformed ex-Marxist came to be, among various heretical designations, perhaps the most steadfast proponent of regime change in Iraq

Cottee, Simon; Cushman, Thomas, 1959-; Hitchens, Christopher.

Cottee, Simon; Cushman, Thomas, 1959-; Hitchens, Christopher. Hitchens, Christopher, War and society, Terrorism, Liberalism. New York : New York University Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on May 1, 2012.

Christopher Eric Hitchens (13 April 1949 – 15 December 2011) was an English-American author, columnist, essayist, orator, journalist, and social critic. A staple of public discourse, his confrontational style of debate made him both a lauded public intellectual and a controversial public figure.

Christopher Hitchens - political journalist, cultural critic . SIMON COTTEE and THOMAS CUSHMAN. Any attempt at a forward look is still compromised by the dreadful, fascinated glance over the shoulder.

Christopher Hitchens - political journalist, cultural critic, public intellectual and self-described contrarian - is one of the most controversial and prolific. A week when the United States itself was a no-fly zone from coast to coast.

Christopher Hitchens has become, over the past decade an unusually well known journalist, widely published author and prominent public intellectual as well as regular presence on television talks shows. He is also a lively polemicist, muckraker and public debater, author of debunking books about former president Clinton, Henry Kissinger and Mother Theresa. An Englishman by birth he made this country his home a quarter century ago. A self-confessed contrarian his interests and preoccupations are political and literary.

He is known for his ardent admiration of George Orwell, Thomas Paine, and Thomas Jefferson, and for his excoriating critiques of Mother.

Jun 02, 2008 Krishan rated it it was amazing. An excellent study of Hitchens' views on terror, Iraq and the left as well a decent compendium of hapless critics that are nevertheless interesting. This leaves us with just a short summery of his views. He is known for his ardent admiration of George Orwell, Thomas Paine, and Thomas Jefferson, and for his excoriating critiques of Mother Teresa, Henry Kissinger and Bill Clinton.

Christopher Hitchens—political journalist, cultural critic, public intellectual and self-described contrarian—is one of the most controversial and prolific writers of his generation. His most recent book, God Is Not Great, was on the New York Times bestseller list in 2007 for months. Like his hero, George Orwell, Hitchens is a tireless opponent of all forms of cruelty, ideological dogma, religious superstition and intellectual obfuscation. Once a socialist, he now refers to himself as an unaffiliated radical. As a thinker, Hitchens is perhaps best viewed as post-ideological, in that his intellectual sources and solidarities are strikingly various (he is an admirer of both Leon Trotsky and Kingsley Amis) and cannot be located easily at any one point on the ideological spectrum. Since leaving Britain for the United States in 1981, Hitchens's thinking has moved in what some see as contradictory directions, but he remains an unapologetic and passionate defender of the Enlightenment values of secularism, democracy, free expression, and scientific inquiry.

The global turmoil of the recent past has provoked intense dispute and division among intellectuals, academics, and other commentators. Hitchens's writing during this time, particularly after 9/11, is an essential reference point for understanding the genesis and meaning of that turmoil—and the challenges that accompany it. This volume brings together Hitchens's most incisive reflections on the war on terror, the war in Iraq, and the state of the contemporary Left. It also includes a selection of critical commentaries on his work from his former leftist comrades, a set of exchanges between Hitchens and various left-leaning interlocutors (such as Studs Terkel, Norman Finkelstein, and Michael Kazin), and an introductory essay by the editors on the nature and significance of Hitchens's contribution to the world of ideas and public debate. In response, Hitchens provides an original afterword, written for this collection.

Whatever readers might think about Hitchens, he remains an intellectual force to be reckoned with. And there is no better place to encounter his current thinking than in this provocative volume.

Comments: (7)
Modar
While I would not agree with Hutchins on many things, his wisdom, even on points of dispute, cause me to reevaluate my own thinking. On issues like terrorism and radical totalitarianisms he devastates his former leftist comrades and they vilify him for it. It’s hard to read the garbage the likes of Noam Chomsky write in reply.
Felolune
After reading "Christopher Hitchens and His Critics: Terror, Iraq, and the Left", edited by his obvious admirers, Thomas Cushman and Simon Cottee, I was very disappointed. After 40 or so pages, by his self-commiseration and his constant references to his critics as stupid or foolish, with constant remarks along the lines of "only a fool would trust the Bush Administration to see all of this," concerning a failure to advise the Iraqis of the objectives of the UN invasion. But it is not only conservatives he abuses for their shortsightedness or lack of insight.

While he is happy to drop that British Labour MP, George Galloway admired him for his "commitment to universal justice", he condemns Galloway for his own vanity and double standards. He remarks, no doubt truthfully, that Galloway was "Prolier than thou, and ostentatiously radical, but a bit too fond of radicals and limos." It seems that for but the first of these criticisms apply to Hitchens himself. He seems a very slippery character who says he felt paradoxically proud to be British. But all in all, it seems that the enigma in which Hitchens clothes himself is just a guise to make him seem different, and to gain distinction for being contrary rather than genuinely insightful.

Hitchens demonstrates ridiculous expectations of the limited resources of the West, but at least he is willing to condemn Democrats as much as Republicans for their sins, including "Clinton's bombing of Sudan to Madeleine Albright's veto of an international rescue of Rwanda." By condemning both decisions it seems it would have been impossible to intervene in any hostilities without drawing criticism. Hitchens appears to grasp the difficulty of identifying enemies in conflicts in Muslim countries, though he demands action be taken to protect moderate Muslims. But he doesn't seem able to identify who they are. He wants action and he wants to blame one and all. He seems unaware that in all wars, the harmless have suffered with the harmful, including up to three million forgotten Germans who died in 1946.

Christopher Hitchens and His Critics: Terror, Iraq, and the Left
Phobism
Excellent book which I highly recommend.
Xtani
Excellent book, well organized and very well written. Highly recommended for any fan of Hitchens.
Dikus
He is missed
Bloodfire
I used to like Christopher Hitchens' essays. But now the grapes have turned sour. It's not just that he has changed his mind; it's his tone that has darkened dramatically. In the agitated piece 'Ha Ha Ha to the Pacifists', he eloquently exclaims: 'Well, ha ha ha, and yah, boo'. Hitchens is angry and anyone who disagrees with him is a fool, or worse. Blame it all on 9/11, sure, but it doesn't always make for great reading. 'Christopher Hitchens and His Critics' is an enlightening book, even if some of his critics - notably Noam Chomsky - declined to take part in it. Most of his adversaries (aka 'enemies') that do contribute, happily join the mudslinging. One of them even offers an 'Obituary for a Former Contrarian'. Distasteful? Maybe not but it really isn't very uplifting either. The book gives us an insight into this whole sorry state of affairs. For this - and an impressive array of invectives - I give it credit. But if you're not familiar with Christopher Hitchens, you'd probably do better by picking up the essays in `For the Sake of Argument' or `Love, Poverty, and War'.
Tori Texer
The late Christopher Hitchens was always a controversial writer, never more so than after 9/11 when he backed George W. Bush's `war on terror' and the attack on Iraq. This collection of reprinted articles includes 41 by Hitchens, 11 critical essays on him, with four responses and an afterword by him.

The editors' introduction is full of praise: "Hitchens' work represents a template for polemical excellence"; "Hitchens deserves to be taken seriously as a unique kind (sic) of intellectual and ... his thinking is indispensable for strengthening the project of secular, democratic cosmopolitan humanism." The editors accuse Hitchens' critics of having no `moral compassion or sorrow for the dead and bereaved' of 9/11.

The editors claim that his writing is `elegant', that he `never lets a cliché or a euphemism pass uncontested'. But are his accusations of `moral cretinism', `spouting sinister piffle' and `spouting fascistic nonsense' really much above the level of a Rush Limbaugh or a Richard Littlejohn? All too many of the pieces in this collection are marred by personal abuse, but as Hitchens acknowledged, "I was the one who issued the first barrage of insults."

Hitchens claimed that the attack on Afghanistan resulted in no `serious loss of civilian life' when US bombs had killed 3,500 civilians by 2002.

The editors reprint Scott Lucas' brilliant piece in the New Statesman, to which Hitchens made no reply. Lucas observed, "Like Orwell, Hitchens has made himself the poster boy of `principled opposition', even as he sides with the dominant powers in the US ..."

They reprint Norman Finkelstein's devastating essay which noted that Hitchens opposed the right to abortion. Finkelstein pointed out that Hitchens claimed falsely in his 2003 book that `empirical proofs have been unearthed' that Iraq did not disarm, a claim that Hitchens did not mention in his eight-page response. But Hitchens then claims in his afterword, "I did not in fact believe that Saddam Hussein had an arsenal of WMD." Though he at once states, "I did believe that he was concealing some of what he had earlier unarguably amassed." Very clear!

Dennis Perrin, George Scialabba, Michael Kazin, Gary Malone and Juan Cole all have fine pieces criticising Hitchens' politics. Malone noted that Hitchens persuaded himself "that the reason for invading a country was wrong but that we could only know this for certain by carrying out the invasion anyway." Hitchens had claimed, without presenting any evidence, that the UN weapons inspection teams were `infiltrated, or suborned, or both'. Malone quotes UN weapons inspector Scott Ritter, "We have the United Nations record of Iraqi disarmament from 1991 to 1998. That record is without dispute. It's documented. We eliminated the nuclear programme ..." But Hitchens wrote, "I had been believably told of stuff hidden in a mosque", so who needed real weapons inspectors?

Hitchens claimed that NATO's `safe havens' in northern Iraq protected the Kurds. But when in 2000-01 Turkish forces invaded and bombed these `safe havens', there was no word of criticism from the USA or Britain (or Hitchens).
Hitchens' support for George W. Bush spread across the board. He backed Bush for re-election. Hitchens said how he admired Thatcher, that he had wanted her to win in 1979 and that he regretted not voting for her. He said in 2001, "There is no longer a general socialist critique of capitalism - certainly not the sort of critique that proposes an alternative or a replacement. There just is not and one has to face the fact."

Hitchens was a frequent warmonger: he backed Thatcher's war over the Falklands and NATO's attack on Yugoslavia. If you make opposition to one-party states (rather than peace) your top priority, as Hitchens did, you accept NATO's rationale for endless wars of aggressive intervention.

The editors write that six authors, including Noam Chomsky and Edward Herman, refused to allow them to reprint their work in this volume, though the editors don't tell us the authors' reasons. The editors end by accusing the six authors of hypocrisy, which may hint why they refused their permission.
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