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eBook Stewart Farrar: Writer On A Broomstick, The Biography of Stewart Farrar epub

by R J Stewart,Janet Farrar,Elizabeth Guerra

eBook Stewart Farrar: Writer On A Broomstick, The Biography of Stewart Farrar epub
  • ISBN: 0979140277
  • Author: R J Stewart,Janet Farrar,Elizabeth Guerra
  • Genre: Religion
  • Subcategory: New Age & Spirituality
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: R J Stewart Books (February 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 232 pages
  • ePUB size: 1767 kb
  • FB2 size 1103 kb
  • Formats docx mbr lrf lit


2008, R J Stewart Books. Libraries near you: WorldCat.

Stewart Farrar Writer On A Broomstick The Biography Of Stewart Farrar. Stewart Farrar Writer On A Broomstick The Biography Of Stewart Farrar Close. 2008, R J Stewart Books.

Elizabeth Guerra and Janet Farrar have collaborated to record and explore Stewart Farrar's life and career in detail. This book tracks Farrar's development from an eager and talented adolescent to a gifted journalist and television, radio and film script writer and finally to his later life as a practitioner of Wicca and author of many nonfiction books and science fiction novels. In 1969, at the age of 53, Stewart met Alex Sanders - the infamous "King of the Witches" - and his wife Maxine while interviewing the couple for Reveille

Start by marking Stewart Farrar: Writer on a Broomstick, the Biography of Stewart Farrar as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This biography tracks Stewart Farrar's life as a journalist and script writer and as a practitioner of Wicca. In 1969, at the age of 53, Stewart met Alex Sanders - the infamous 'King of the Witches' - which introduced him to a world of Witchcraft and magic.

Biography of Stewart Farrar Written by Elizabeth Guerra with Janet Farrar

Biography of Stewart Farrar Written by Elizabeth Guerra with Janet Farrar. Most people know Stewart Farrar as a journalist and author of books on Wicca, as well as many novels, but this book really gives an insight into the progressive views he had about the world, as well as Wicca and Paganism.

Items related to Stewart Farrar: Writer on a Broomstick. Stewart Farrar was a World War II veteran, an accomplished script writer and a journalist who worked for many prominent and respected media companies such as Reuters and the newspaper Reveille. Guerra, Elizabeth; Farrar, Janet Stewart Farrar: Writer on a Broomstick. ISBN 13: 9781908011848. Stewart Farrar: Writer on a Broomstick. Guerra, Elizabeth; Farrar, Janet. As a world traveller, Stewart had the opportunity to meet and work with many fascinating people and noted celebrities during his career. He was also a gifted photographer.

Frank Stewart Farrar (28 June 1916 – 7 February 2000), who always went by the name of Stewart Farrar, was an English screenwriter, novelist and prominent figure in the Neopagan religion of Wicca.

Frank Stewart Farrar (28 June 1916 – 7 February 2000), who always went by the name of Stewart Farrar, was an English screenwriter, novelist and prominent figure in the Neopagan religion of Wicca, which he devoted much of his later life to propagating with the aid of his seventh wife, Janet Farrar, and then his friend Gavin Bone as well

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In 1980, Omega was "recent future" science fiction, and, although the setting is now, the premise still holds

In 1980, Omega was "recent future" science fiction, and, although the setting is now, the premise still holds. Scientists have learned to tap the power of the earth's electro-magnetic field-put 150 kilowatts of power into two electrodes on opposite sides of the globe and get 4015 megawatts. They think the world's energy problems are over! Well, not quit. he conflict is between the forces of technology and greed and the gentle men and women who have respect for the land, are in touch with nature, and practice the "craft of the wise"-witchcraft

Elizabeth Guerra and Janet Farrar have collaborated to record and explore Stewart Farrar's life and career in detail. This book tracks Farrar's development from an eager and talented adolescent to a gifted journalist and television, radio and film script writer and finally to his later life as a practitioner of Wicca and author of many nonfiction books and science fiction novels. In 1969, at the age of 53, Stewart met Alex Sanders - the infamous "King of the Witches" - and his wife Maxine while interviewing the couple for Reveille. The encounter introduced him to a world of Witchcraft and magic and changed the course of his life. Stewart Farrar found Witchcraft by accident but devoted the rest of his life to the subject by educating others. He became one of the most prolific and much loved writers on the subject, and in doing so, helped to make Wicca a viable and accessible spiritual path for many.
Comments: (4)
Fordregelv
From my first eclectic days on, Stewart seemed like some relative one grows up hearing about though one has not met them, but who is clearly loved and respected and so often and so fondly talked about that you look forward to when you will inevitably meet them. That sense has only increased since.

Sometimes when people pass there is not only the obvious grief by those close to them, but it has an impact on a wider community - other people who didn't know them well or at all won't so much grieve but will feel a sense of loss. Sometimes the reason for this impact will be the nature of the death - tragedies that kill whole families or fatal accidents in a local industry - and sometimes it relates more to the impact, the life, the presence of the people in question. They'd made their presence felt widely and that presence is missed when it's gone, sometimes by people only then recognising what a force that person had had.

In my short time in the Irish Pagan community I can think of three passings that had such an impact. This is subjective of course, we're too diverse a group with too many shining lights amongst us that I can only speak of those times that I saw this sense of loss and can't presume that others didn't have the same impact albeit not witnessed by me.

And when it happens there is a difficulty. How do we express this sense of loss? Can we even have the audacity to do so when those closer to the deceased are beside us grieving so much more deeply, so much more terribly?

My first glance at this book brought two memories. Stewart's passing was the first of those I mentioned above, and Rhiannon Lee-Doyle's the third. The dedication to Rhiannon immediately brought to mind her mother turning towards the funeral guests and thanking us for coming and overlaid with that was the memory of her standing, having performed Stewart's funeral rites, while Janet stood beside her and thanked us for coming to that funeral.

I was attending Stewart's funeral not in a personal capacity, but representing the eclectic group I belonged to at the time. The "inevitable" meeting with him never did take place and I'd met Janet and Gavin only briefly once before. I was there out of politeness and respect, not grief. I never knew him and yet I felt a loss of him.

And so I started reading this book with a mixture of that sense of loss and a shame at daring to feel loss for someone I never knew and someone I barely knew when their survivors were hit by grief.

Partly for this reason, therefore, I especially appreciated the remembrances section. It is nicely handled in its mixing of personal remembrances of those who would have grieved Stewart's passing with remembrances from people who did not, but who feel such a loss as I write of here, and gives each an appropriate space.

The writing is first-book writing - and the author is at a unfair disadvantage; to bring to mind such a lucid and fluid writer in a reader while they read your own writing is not an enviable prospect - but it's good first-book writing. While a few laboured moments do jar, as a whole if flows very well and I had read it from cover to cover before I'd even discarded the packaging (though the poems I left to return to as my brain was in "non-fiction" mode when I got to them and I couldn't give them the reading they deserve until later).

The technique of using quotes from Kipling poems to head each chapter was fantastic. What other poet would be so perfectly appropriate to the story of a child, an eager bright young man, a soldier, a writer, an initiate, an elder of the Craft, and finally to one who has passed from us? He was a favourite of Stewart's (it's clear from his writing that he liked Kipling, and we learn more on this in the book) and the choice seems obvious, but is the sort of obvious that all the best ideas are once somebody else has already had them. Rarely are chapter heading quotes such an enjoyable part of a book.

There is more to say on Stewart. More to be gleaned from his writings. His Craft writing alone deserves, and will hopefully some day receive, a thorough analysis of the sort that he himself conducted on the writings of Wiccans who came before him. This though is the story of who and what we in the Farrar lines, in the Craft as a whole and in the wider Pagan community lost when he died.

A difficulty the author had was with the amount of background detail needed for younger readers and those outside of Britain and Ireland at various points in the telling. It's a difficult, probably impossible, balance to get right and at first I was rather annoyed at some of it, until I reminded myself that much was from periods that I've actively sought stories about, from those who lived through them, since I was very young. Not everyone will have heard as much about the war through to Swinging London from their parents' and grandparents' generations, and increasingly it is the great- and soon even great-great-grandchildren of Stewart's generation that are taking their first steps in seeking various forms of witchcraft and pagan worship, with many of them benefiting not just from Stewart's work, but from work which in turn built on his. It is wholly appropriate that the balance lean towards serving that audience for here is a book with which the author can beat the bounds - take youngsters around and show them "this is where you come from".
Rocksmith
Finally, the other side of the story. From the amazing foreward by the publisher himself, R.J. Stewart, to the unpublished poetry of Janet and Stewart Farrar, this book is a delight to read. Many of us knew Stewart Farrar through his many writings on Wicca. Most practicing pagans use material written by Stewart, whether they realize it, or not. Now, we get to meet the man behind that in this biography. Liz Guerra, chosen by Stewart's widow Janet, pens the story of her late husband, weaving his life's journey that's simply a joy to read. With access to his archives, Ms. Guerra weaves a lovely tale of the man, who helped put Wicca on the map. And, most importantly, in the hands of anyone who read his books. We get a sense of this man, as Ms. Guerra deftly spins his story with-in a charming historical framework. Her easy-to-read work will be a joy to most readers seeking out an important piece of Craft history. While Ray Buckland physically brought the Craft to our shores, Stewart did so literally.
Inertedub
I found this to be a well written biography. I felt as if I knew Stewart personally from the background information and character observations that were written about him by Miss Guerra. Guerra's sources and researched information were carefully written for the world to see. I even felt like I knew Janet and her experience through working with Stewart and eventually falling in love with him. The whole book was not only a history lesson of that time, but a love story. A story of the human condition of finding spirituality and forgiveness as well as the ever continuous chore of growing as a spiritual being in a human body.

I was so moved by the book that I have started telling all of my friends about it, and I am ordering it for the main library at Yale University. It is a book well worth having as a research tool for scholars and a piece of literature that is sure to be a classic in due time.

It makes me hopeful for a follow up on Janet and Gavin's progress with Stewart's legacy they have inherited. I must say...the book has enlightened me on so much in the area of work that Stewart progressed and evolved into. I hope Miss Guerra will keep up her research and have a follow up on this legacy.
Sharpbringer
This is a must read biography of the man who who along with his wife(Janet Farrar) wrote some of the first and best books on witchcraft and what it is. After reading his biography, I really felt like I knew the man that Stewart Farrar was. Elizabeth Guerra obviously did a lot of research on this book and her efforts paid off. I can't believe this is her first book published. I look forward to her future works.
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