» » 13: The Story of the World's Most Popular Superstition

eBook 13: The Story of the World's Most Popular Superstition epub

by Nathaniel Lachenmeyer

eBook 13: The Story of the World's Most Popular Superstition epub
  • ISBN: 1568583060
  • Author: Nathaniel Lachenmeyer
  • Genre: Religion
  • Subcategory: Occult & Paranormal
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Running Press (October 5, 2004)
  • Pages: 240 pages
  • ePUB size: 1861 kb
  • FB2 size 1559 kb
  • Formats lrf docx rtf lrf


13 brings together forgotten history and unknown facts about unlucky 13 to create the compelling story of the rise of a single belief.

13 brings together forgotten history and unknown facts about unlucky 13 to create the compelling story of the rise of a single belief. Lachenmeyer's book is an enjoyable tour looking at the different 13 superstitions (there are many of them), trying to make historic sense of why people have adopted this number as some sort of portentous sign. Lachenmeyer came to the subject by chance, reading an article in an old scrapbook about the Thirteen Club, but has never had any particular feeling toward the number: "To me, 13 has always been just a number.

In 13, a fascinating cultural e story, Nathaniel Lachenmeyer gets to the root of how one superstition-the fear of the number. Triskaidekaphobia: fear of the number 13. If thirteen people sit down at a table, will one die within a year? Why did five . presidents join the Thirteen Club? What is the only major New York hotel that has a thirteenth floor?

Lachenmeyer's book is an enjoyable tour looking at the different 13 superstitions . As Lachenmeyer writes, "Reason governs a much smaller domain in the world of ideas than we are accustomed to acknowledging.

Lachenmeyer's book is an enjoyable tour looking at the different 13 superstitions (there are many of them), trying to make historic sense of why people have adopted this number as some sort of portentous sign.

In the novel, a stock broker takes advantage of the superstition to create a Wall Street panic on Friday the 13th. Wall Street has fostered a fear of Friday the 13th for decades

13 answers the following questions, among others: When did the 13 superstition begin, and why? Why is Spain divided over whether Tuesday the 13th or Friday the 13th is the traditional unlucky 13th day? What other number superstitions exist in other cultures? Which is the only major hotel in New York City that has a 13th floor? What are the top three conspiracy theories about unlucky 13?

Nathaniel sees the power of thirteen diminishing over time – or even reversing again back to being beneficent as it had been for most of the last couple of thousand years – but mostly due to a misunderstanding of the new pagans. I found all this amusing and very interesting. I enjoyed this little book very much.

In 13, a fascinating cultural e story, Nathaniel Lachenmeyer gets to the root of how one superstition-the fear of the .

In 13, a fascinating cultural e story, Nathaniel Lachenmeyer gets to the root of how one superstition-the fear of the number 13-developed among wildly divergent societies. A book about mythmaking, 13 explores why people believe what they believe, and the real reason Friday the 13th is the most unlucky day in the world.

Nathaniel Lachenmeyer. There were points where the author got a little too detailed into some of the minutiae of the superstitions, and I found the psychology section particularly dull

Nathaniel Lachenmeyer. There were points where the author got a little too detailed into some of the minutiae of the superstitions, and I found the psychology section particularly dull. pbadeer, July 12, 2011.

Varying Form of Title: Story of the world's most popular superstition. Varying Form of Title: Thirteen : the story of the world's most popular superstition. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book 13 : the story of the world's most popular superstition, Nathaniel Lachenmeyer.

With every turn of the page the reader is presented with another odd relic that Lachenmeyer has dug up for our perusal: the existence of popular 13 clubs at the beginning of the 20th century, for example. And onward the book moves through Friday the 13th, the missing 13th floor, and all the rest.

13 brings together forgotten history and unknown facts about unlucky 13 to create the compelling story of the rise of a single belief. It is also a book about superstition in general — why people believe what they believe and why they stop believing when they do. 13 draws on history and the range of contemporary superstitions; in so doing, it touches on the fate of mythmaking in general. 13 answers the following questions, among others: When did the 13 superstition begin, and why? Why is Spain divided over whether Tuesday the 13th or Friday the 13th is the traditional unlucky 13th day? What other number superstitions exist in other cultures? Which is the only major hotel in New York City that has a 13th floor? What are the top three conspiracy theories about unlucky 13? What is the Thirteen Club, and why did it count three U.S. presidents among its members?
Comments: (7)
Mr.Death
This book includes some fascinating material on the number 13 and associated superstitions (13 at a table, Friday the 13th, etc.) and puts it in context as a relatively recent phenomenon. For the most part the writing is very engaging and the author has included lists and illustrations. Unfortunately the book also strays from the central subject at points, making these parts seem like something to get through rather than part of the whole. On the other hand, I do enjoy the fact that he placed the wiccan movement and its associated superstitions (and paranoid delusions) in context as a recent fabrication as well.

Overall, well worth reading just for the research.
Lightseeker
The book gives all the possible information regarding Friday 13th, however bit too much, almost as if needed to fill space.
Aedem
There are probably scads and scads of books like 13. I've seen them in libraries and used book stores. They are books that take on one topic and mine it for endless anecdotes and historical curios, but they don't claim that by looking through the prism of the topic at hand, a reader can discern the entire arc of human history. The books are about what they are about, and all you need to do as a reader is sit back and be entertained and informed. John McPhee, who is very good at this sort of thing, once wrote a book entirely about Oranges, for example. Nathaniel Lachenmeyer does this sort of thing well, too. His book is an impeccably researched look at an old superstition. With every turn of the page the reader is presented with another odd relic that Lachenmeyer has dug up for our perusal: the existence of popular superstition-defying "13 clubs" at the beginning of the 20th century, for example. And onward the book moves through Friday the 13th, the missing 13th floor, and all the rest. Taken as a whole, the book is a nifty piece of well-researched reportage bringing to light the many murky progenitors of this now commonplace superstition.
Kea
Unlucky 13 is a superstition that has been with us for a long, long time. So why has it taken a long, long time for our writers to finally ask the question: where did Unlucky 13 come from? Fortunately Nathaniel Lachenmeyer not only dares to ask the question but also shrewdly proceeds to answer it and explain the myth's development from a variety of alternate perspectives: religious, psychologial, educational, social, etc. You can tell this is a guy who doesn't mind getting his hands dirty--he willingly digs through old newspaper clippings and obscure books that are centuries old, in search of historical clues that pinpoint the legend of unlucky 13. One of the most redeeming qualities of this book is the amount of work the writer has obviously put into the delivery of a quality product. I had no idea (before reading 13) that one origin of the superstition was The Last Supper (Jesus and his 12 disciples) or that a popular social club in the early 20th century was created for the sole purpose of debunking the myth of Unlucky 13 at a dinner table (the details of which I shall leave to your reading.) Mr. Lachenmeyer also reveals a gift for recognizing nuance. "Friday, the 13th" as listed in an early 20th century edition of the New York Times eventually becomes a few years later "Friday the 13th" (without a comma!) revealing a subtle but very real hint of how popular perception of that day changed in a short time. You can do worse with your time than put yourself in Mr. Lachenmeyer's talented hands. His attention to detail, his perceptive intelligence and reverberating eagerness to reseach the heck out of "13" and get to the bottom of this popular superstition help create a reading experience that will leave you satisified, entertained and in possession of a great topic for your next dinner-time conversation. Well done!
Mayno
I can understand some of the obsession around a particular number, since the college I attended has a longtime fascination with "47", and alumni use the number as a way to secretly identify each other. Nathaniel Lachenmeyer's "13", even at a manageable 200 pages, is a very thorough encyclopedia on the number 13. It's filled with facts, history, anecdotes, and period illustrations. I enjoyed reading it. Sometimes I just opened it to different pages and learned new things. It turns out there's an actual word to describe a morbid fear of the number 13: "Triskaidekaphobia". And I always wondered why none of the hotels in New York have a 13th floor (well, except for the Waldorf-Astoria, apparently). You'll have to read the book to find out for yourself why that is. "13" is a pleasant, interesting read, and a great gift.
Visonima
I had to look at the table of contents to make sure that the book the other reviewers rated so highly was the same one that I'm reading now. I'm only finishing it because I compulsively have to complete what I start. I picked up the book while browsing in a bookstore. After recently reading "Zero: The Biography of a Dangerous Idea" by Charles Seife, I was really in the mood for the history of meaningful numbers. Whereas "Zero" was a comprehensively researched piece that discussed the importance of 0 through history and science, this book reads like a high school research paper. The level of research is very shallow, including book sources that are relatively recent, newspaper articles, the internet, anecdotal telephone conversations, and even A&E programs -- nothing that couldn't be found in your local public library. It is essentially a (light) discussion of 13 in modern American culture. For a book subtitled "The Story of the World's Most Popular Superstition," it rarely discusses the number's significance in other cultures, countries or eras.

I find it hard to believe that anyone actually published this book. The first chapter was completely unnecessary, and after the second chapter, everything else is redundant or fluff. I'm very disappointed. While the book is interesting, it in no way compares to the level of research and analysis that I so enjoyed in Zero.
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